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100 Best Skills to Include on a Resume (With Examples)

by
Hotel Tech Report
1 week ago

Revising your resume or crafting a cover letter? Our list of 100+ best skills to include on a resume will help your application stand out to recruiters and hiring managers. The economy is moving quickly, so we compiled this list to highlight the most in-demand skills for today’s job market. We’ve organized the list by skill category so you can easily find the section most relevant to you: Communication and listening skills Customer service skills Interpersonal skills Technical and computer skills Leadership and management skills Communication and listening skills Hospitality industry employees can take advantage of constant opportunities to practice their communication and listening skills with guests, colleagues, and managers. And communication skills are some of the most in-demand skills for all industries, even outside of hospitality. Verbal communication: What did you say? Verbal communication isn’t just about talking, but clearly articulating the point you want to convey. Best practices when communicating verbally include avoiding filler words and jargon and using a strong, clear voice. In a hotel environment, front desk agents use verbal communication when checking guests in. Good verbal communication skills are especially important because these verbal interactions can make or break the guest experience. Written communication: Like verbal communication, the goal of written communication is to clearly communicate to an audience - but this time, the audience is reading your words instead of hearing them. You can practice written communication through writing emails, signage, memos, menus, reports, and more.  Phone skills: “Thank you for calling the Four Seasons New York, how can I assist you today?” If you’ve ever worked in a guest-facing role at a hotel or restaurant (or even a retail store), chances are you’ve answered a few phone calls! Good phone skills include speaking at an appropriate volume, being conscious of pauses, multi-tasking (pulling up the guest’s profile while holding a conversion, for example), and adjusting your tone to match that of the caller. When including “phone skills” on your resume, remember to quantify the number of calls you fielded. Remote communication: In the post-COVID business world, remote communication has become increasingly popular with many people working from home or in a socially distanced environment. If you’re a good remote communicator, you can keep your audience engaged over a video call, convey your message in a variety of formats (like sending your key points in an email and explaining them over a video call), and maintain rapport with clients or colleagues even if you aren’t sitting together in the same physical office. Public speaking: Mic check, 1, 2, 3… Public speaking is an essential skill for many roles that interface with guests, clients, or colleagues. Perhaps you’ve hosted an event, led a training session, or presented a business case to executives - these are all good examples of public speaking experience.  Constructive criticism: If you can provide constructive criticism in a strategic, polite way, your colleagues or clients will be more receptive to it. For instance, if you are training new front desk agents and your trainee isn’t speaking clearly enough, your constructive advice will help him deliver a better guest experience. Active listening: Communication isn’t only about sharing information with others, it’s also about listening. Active listening includes using body language and eye contact to show your focus on the speaker, like when you hold eye contact with a restaurant patron and orient your body to face them while they’re speaking. Asking questions: Another component of active listening is asking good questions - both to show your engagement and to probe for information you need. For instance, if you’re taking a reservation from a guest over the phone, asking targeted questions about the purpose of the guest’s trip or the type of room she wants can help you better meet the guest’s needs. Note-taking: It might seem simple, but note-taking is an extremely helpful and important skill, especially for roles that involve teamwork or interaction with clients or customers. You can hone your note-taking skills by taking notes during meetings or phone conversions. Nonverbal communication: The words that you speak are just part of your communication skills; nonverbal communication, or body language, can tell your audience just as much (or more!) about your message. Nonverbal communication involves your facial expression (like whether you’re smiling or not), body position, posture, hand gestures, and eye contact.  Bilingual or other language skills: Do you speak another language? Language skills are more and more in-demand as the world becomes more globalized. When including language skills on your resume, remember to include your level of fluency, certifications, or professional context (for example, if you spoke Spanish with your housekeeping employees as a housekeeping manager). Communication software: In today’s high-tech world, you need to have a solid grasp of communication software in addition to speaking, writing, and listening skills. If you’ve used communication software like Slack, Zoom, Skype, or others, you can highlight your expertise by noting it on your resume.  Customer service skills As the saying goes, you want to “know your customer,” but to be a good customer service professional, you need to master customer service skills first.  Emotional intelligence: Perhaps the customer service-related skill that is most transferable to other types of jobs is emotional intelligence. If you have high emotional intelligence, you can manage and control your own emotions and handle relationships with colleagues or clients with ease. For example, if you are in a stressful situation like a busy day of check-ins, emotional intelligence helps you stay calm and recognize if and when guests are getting upset so you can act accordingly. Problem solving: Like emotional intelligence, problem solving is another skill that is very in-demand no matter which industry you want to work in. If you’ve worked in a hospitality context, you probably have a slew of examples you can mention in interviews, like how you managed to deliver a good experience for a guest who booked the wrong room type or how you figured out a solution for restaurant patrons who showed up on a night that was fully booked. Conflict resolution: Similar to problem solving, resolving conflicts is another essential customer service skill. Conflicts are stressful, so your expertise in resolving them shows you can stay calm under pressure, remain objective, and avoid placing blame.  De-escalating skills: Have you ever needed to calm down a guest who was screaming, yelling, and making a scene in the lobby? If so, you can speak to your de-escalating skills, which would make you an asset to any organization that interfaces with the occasional difficult customer. Crisis management: In hotel and restaurant jobs, crises are bound to happen every once in a while. Any example from your own work experience can help you illustrate how you stayed calm and responsible during unexpected, serious events like medical emergencies. Sales skills: As a customer service professional, even if “sales” isn’t technically part of your role, you’re always selling your product or brand to your customers. As a front desk agent, for example, the experience you provide to your guests will influence them to choose your hotel again - or not.  Product knowledge: Customer service professionals are often the face of the business, since they’re usually the first ones to interact with customers. If you have strong product knowledge skills, you’re a fast learner and can become well acquainted with the product to answer customer questions or else direct customers to the correct department. Upselling: In some customer service roles, upselling is an opportunity to further flex your sales skills, make an impact on the business’s bottom line, and build stronger relationships with customers. As a hotel reservations agent, for example, you might include on your resume that you secured $50,000 in upsell revenue or increased the average reservation revenue by 8%. Negotiation: A component of any role that involves working with multiple parties is negotiation, which involves a combination of communication, listening, and sales skills. Negotiation examples are common in a sales context, like negotiating contracts for group room blocks, but also in situations like finding a solution for a guest who isn’t happy with their room or a diner who doesn’t like their meal. Persuasion: A key to influencing your guests or clients to accept your desired outcome is persuasion - but not in a manipulating way! If you’ve mastered persuasion, you can guide your client toward giving the OK by illustrating how your solution meets their needs so that when they agree, they feel totally satisfied with the outcome. Attention to detail: Customer service interactions are packed with little details from the correct spelling of the customer’s name to specific needs like allergies or birthday surprises. Attention to detail helps you ensure that no aspect of experience gets overlooked. Multitasking: In a customer service role, you’ll likely need to multitask, whether by taking notes during calls or operating multiple software apps at once. Demonstrating your multitasking skills shows that you’ll be ready to jump in from day one. Relationship building: Building rapport with guests or customers is a powerful way to deliver great customer service experiences. Engaging in small talk with customers or remembering a repeat guest’s name are simple but effective ways to build relationships and develop brand loyalty. Enthusiasm: Companies want their customer professionals to be excited about the product of service - if the employees aren’t jazzed up about what they’re selling, why would customers want to buy? Showing your enthusiastic personality is a great way to stand out. Confidence: Like enthusiasm, your confidence helps customers feel good about their customer service interaction. Confidence also helps you take risks, try new things, and flex your leadership skills. Business etiquette: Though at times manners might seem like a lost art in the 21st century, they’re still very important in customer service. Using simple words like “please” and “thank you” set you apart as a customer service professional who cares about conveying a good company image. Service orientation: You can learn many components of a customer service role, like information about the product, but it’s a lot harder to teach people to have a service-oriented attitude. If you have a service orientation, you aim to please and exceed customers’ expectations. Interpersonal skills In just about every job, you’ll need to work with other people on a regular basis, so interpersonal skills are essential to a successful career.  Teamwork: Working successfully with colleagues is a must for most roles in and out of the hospitality industry, so hiring managers are always looking for examples of how you’ve been a good team player.  Cross-functional collaboration: Besides working with your direct colleagues, you may need to work closely with people in other departments. Showing experience of cross-functional collaboration, like if you’ve been a housekeeping manager working closely with the maintenance department, is always a plus. Decision making: Your resume is not the place to mention analysis paralysis! Every role will require decision making, so hiring managers want to see that you can carefully weigh your options and come to the right conclusion. Organization: In order to work with colleagues or customers, you need to have your own responsibilities organized first. Organizational skills include time management, note-taking, punctuality, and more. Responsibility: As you progress in your career, you’ll be trusted with increasing levels of responsibility. You’ll stand out among applicants if you can demonstrate that you’re responsible, like if you’ve owned up to a mistake or stayed late to complete a task you promised to finish. Punctuality: Nobody wants to work with someone who’s chronically late; punctuality is a fantastic way to show you value your colleagues’ or clients’ time. When you’re interviewing for a new role, make sure to show up on time for the interview! Dependability: In any team-oriented role, your team needs to know they can rely on you to show up and work hard. Dependability is crucial to being a good team player; for example, if you’ve never forgotten to show up to a shift, you can include “dependable” on your resume.  Flexibility: Even the best laid plans can fall through, and being flexible is an important quality for any role. For instance, you might need to cover a team member’s tasks if they get sick unexpectedly. Creativity: Do you like to think outside of the box? Creativity doesn’t just mean being artistic; creative thinking helps you come up with new solutions to problems or try initiatives to bring the business to the next level.  Adaptability: Like flexibility, adaptability means you’re comfortable with change, but if you’re adaptable, you can easily shift to a new way of doing things. For instance, a shift to a remote work environment requires significant adaptability! Patience: If you’ve worked in any guest- or customer-facing role, then you know patience is crucial to your success. You can practice being patient by remaining calm and positive when things don’t move as quickly as you’d like - like traffic, slow WiFi, or even those last couple restaurant patrons who linger for hours. Confidentiality: In a hospitality context, you’re often trusted with sensitive information. Confidentiality means you can not only keep a secret, but also determine which information must be treated with extra care. Communication: Among the most important interpersonal skills is communication; without good communication skills, it’s nearly impossible to work well with others! Communication skills include written, verbal, and nonverbal elements, plus skills like active listening and public speaking. Teaching or training skills: Roles with more responsibility often include a training or teaching component, such as training new front desk agents. If you’ve had any sort of teaching experience, be sure to include on your resume the context and the number of people you trained. Collaboration: In many jobs, you’ll need to collaborate with others on a project, an event, or something similar. Collaboration involves dividing responsibility, holding each other accountable, and completing one integrated product. Networking: It might be painful at first, but networking is an extremely useful skill - it might even help you land your next job! A good networker knows what they want to gain from each interaction, has an elevator pitch prepared, sends follow-ups, and stays in touch with connections. Technical and computer skills Many jobs require not only soft skills like communication and customer service skills, but also specific technical skills. Showing your technical or computer expertise on your resume will help you be a more competitive applicant. Microsoft Office: As one of the most popular software suites in the business world, Microsoft Office experience is often requested on job descriptions. Microsoft Office expertise usually includes Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. You may have used Microsoft PowerPoint to put training presentations together or Excel to analyze financial data. G-Suite: Like Microsoft Office, the Google suite of apps is a popular one in many industries. Since G-Suite apps are designed for cloud-based collaboration, remote companies or jobs that involve a lot of teamwork might prefer G-Suite experience over Microsoft Office. G-Suite includes Google Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, and more.  Email management: How many unread emails are in your inbox? Email management skills can involve not only just reading and sorting emails, but also managing a shared inbox and composing emails for optimum readability. Spreadsheets: If you see life in columns and rows, then your spreadsheet skills are worthy of inclusion on your resume. You may want to mention specific and relevant details about your spreadsheet expertise, like in which context you used them and the types of formulas you mastered. Data analysis: Analytical experience can vary by industry and type of role, so if you’ve had any relevant experience, it’s important to clearly describe what you did with as much quantification as possible. For example, maybe you used Excel to analyze the cost and revenue projections to decide whether or not to purchase a new airport shuttle bus for your hotel. Database management: As more business work to wrangle big data, database management can be an attractive skill. If you’ve had experience with data validation or writing reports or queries, don’t forget to include that experience on your resume. Programming languages: If you’re applying for programming roles, then mentioning your handle of programming languages, like Python or Java, is crucial. If you’re currently learning a programming language, you can mention that too, though be honest about your level of expertise. Web design: Simply including “web design” on your resume isn’t enough; hiring managers want to see concrete examples of websites, apps, or software that you’ve built. Include key details like the number of app downloads or monthly website visits. Website building: Even if you don’t know how to code, you might have built websites before! Experience using content management systems or website builders is still worthy of a mention, and be sure to quantify your experience in terms of number of websites built or number of website visitors. Adobe Photoshop/InDesign: Similar to listing your expertise in G-Suite or programming languages, mentioning your experience with Adobe’s suite of software can also show your preparedness for a role in design-related fields. Systems administration: Another valuable IT-related skill is systems administration, which involves being the manager and subject matter expert for a software application or system within an organization. For instance, if you were the administrator for your hotel’s property management system. Troubleshooting: In any tech-oriented role, you’ll need to know how to troubleshoot effectively. You can demonstrate your troubleshooting skills by approaching a problem systematically and identifying issues and solutions. Expertise in specific software applications: As a hotel or restaurant employee, you may have had experience with specific systems, like HotSOS or SynXis, for example. Noting your expertise on applications for relevant roles will help you stand out among applicants who have never used those systems. Marketing skills Looking for a new marketing role? You may want to include these skills on your resume or develop them to become a more competitive candidate. Search engine optimization: Do you know how to do keyword research or write a good meta description? SEO is a great skill to include on your resume when applying to marketing roles. Remember to mention any relevant statistics from SEO responsibilities you’ve had in the past.  Search engine marketing: In addition to optimizing your performance in search results, you may also have had experience with paid SEM, like Google Ads. Be sure to include your budget, return on ad spend, or any other relevant stats. Pay-per-click marketing: Like SEM and SEO, experience with PPC marketing can help you stand out among candidates for digital marketing roles. For example, if you’ve used Expedia TravelAds or Tripadvisor Sponsored Campaigns in a hotel context, your experience can make you an attractive applicant for other digital marketing jobs. Email marketing: As more and more business shifts online, email marketing is a powerful way to keep in touch with customers. Showing your expertise with email marketing tools like Mailchimp and Constant Contact is especially relevant today. Content management systems: Some marketing roles look for candidates with experience using content management systems such as Wordpress or Contentful. Remember to note your level of expertise and the specific system you’ve used. A/B testing: A savvy marketer will test two strategies to see which one performs better. Examples of A/B testing to include on your resume could include experimenting with subject lines in an email newsletter or uploading different featured photos on your restaurant website. Customer relationship management: Every business wants to generate more repeat business, so CRM is an attractive skill for marketing roles. If you have CRM experience, also include the system you’ve used, like Salesforce. Social media: Do you know how to leverage tweets, pins, and posts in a business context? Show off your social media skills by including engagement statistics and follower growth on your resume.  Branding: If you’ve started a business from scratch or worked in a start-up, you might have experience creating a brand, like selecting a name, logo, color scheme, and voice. Hiring managers looking for branding experience might want to see a portfolio of examples of your work. Sales and financial skills Skills in the sales and finance sectors are often transferable to other industries. For example, if you’ve worked as a sales manager at a hotel, you could be a competitive applicant to a sales position at a software or retail company. Lead generation: How can you sell something if you have no leads? Lead generation is one of the first steps in the sales process, and it involves scraping databases or the internet for potential customers, like gathering a list of contact info for all nearby restaurants for outreach about your new restaurant POS app. Lead qualification: After generating leads, you need to sort out the leads that have high potential. Lead qualification is another skill hiring managers will look for to show that you use strategy in the sales process. Prospecting: Once you have your leads list, the prospecting process involves regularly communicating with your leads to ensure your product is always top of mind, even if they aren’t ready to commit. Contracting: Ready to seal the deal? Contracting typically involves negotiation and attention to detail, though today’s contracts are most likely signed via digital apps like DocuSign instead of an old school pen and paper. Event planning: Whether you’ve planned small company gatherings or red-carpet galas, event planning is an attractive skill to include on your resume. Make sure to mention how many events you’ve planned and the number of attendees - and you get bonus points if you’ve planned virtual events on digital platforms! Revenue management: Selling the right room at the right price to the right customer is the goal of hotel revenue managers, so demonstrating your success through RevPAR increases or direct share growth is a good best practice when applying for revenue management roles. If you’ve had any experience using revenue management systems such as IDeAS, be sure to note that as well. Central reservations systems: Hotels, tour operators, event venues, and more often use central reservation systems to organize their bookings and client information. When experience using a CRS is relevant, don’t forget to mention the specific system you’ve used. Online travel agencies: Do you know the ins and outs of OTA extranets? When applying for marketing or revenue management roles at hotels or short-term rental companies, mentioning your OTA experience can give you a leg up compared to someone brand new to the industry. Point of sale systems: If you have experience in a retail or hospitality context, you may have had experience using POS software, which can be relevant to include on your resume when applying to similar positions. Cash handling: Although many businesses are becoming cashless, showing your cash handling experience can show that you’re a responsible, trustworthy employee. Accounting: Depending on your accounting experience, you may want to include accounting skills on your resume, which could involve accounting software (such as QuickBooks), familiarity with local regulations, attention to detail, and analytical skills. Profit and loss statements: Perhaps your accounting experience includes creating or analyzing P&L statements, like if you’ve prepared P&Ls for hotel owners and executives.  Financial modelling: Along with analyzing actualized financial numbers, if you’ve done any financial modelling or forecasting, these experiences are also relevant when applying to finance roles. Be sure to note your level of proficiency in Excel or other database software. Cost management: Your application to any finance role can also include your experience with cost management, whether that includes familiarity with direct or indirect costs, math skills, or financial software. PCI compliance: Any handling of sensitive data like credit card numbers must comply with industry standards, and your resume should reflect your knowledge of those guidelines. As a front desk agent, for example, you may have completed PCI compliance training or a course about similar standards, which can be an asset to your resume.  Leadership and management skills As you continue along your career path, you might work up to leadership positions. But holding a “manager” role doesn’t automatically mean you’re an effective leader; these leadership and management skills will help you earn respect from your direct reports and deliver the results you want. Mentorship: Even if you haven’t held a formal management role yet, you can still demonstrate your leadership skills through informal mentorship programs, volunteer activities, or professional relationships that have a mentorship component. Team building: As a leader in an organization, you’ll be expected to build and maintain a cohesive team. Your resume should mention your team building skills, such as examples like increasing employee satisfaction scores or leading team events. Team communication: Besides standard verbal and written communication skills, a great leader should have experience communicating with a large team audience. Perhaps you’ve led weekly meetings for your department or sent memos to all employees at your company. Presentation skills: Communicating with a large internal or external audience might include presentations, and if you have notable presentation experience, it’s worth a mention on your resume. Note the setting and audience of your presentations, such as quarterly business review presentations with the executive team and hotel owners. Meeting facilitation: Besides leading presentations, managers often lead meetings with employees, colleagues, and other internal or external stakeholders. Demonstrating your ability to keep meetings organized, on track, and productive is a great way to prove your management skills. Time management: As a manager, you’ll have constant demands on your time. Time management is crucial to success, and even if it’s not the most buzz-worthy skill, it’s one that can mean the difference between a good and a great manager. Set limits on the number of meetings per day, schedule deep work blocks, and make sure to take time away from work to recharge. Project management: When leading initiatives, managers are often responsible for keeping the project on track. Project management skills include planning each step of the project, assigning responsibilities to each team member, scheduling regular follow-ups, and securing resources. Organizational planning: Especially in small companies or start-ups, managers are responsible for building teams and hiring new employees. A much-needed skill is organizational planning, which includes identifying skills or competencies that a new role can fill on your team. Interviewing: A key step in the hiring process is interviewing, and solid interview skills are essential to success as a hiring manager. On your resume, you can mention how many employees you’ve hired and what their retention rate is. Performance tracking: Employees need regular feedback to continue delivering excellent work, and managers must manage performance through regular check-ins and performance reviews. For example, sales managers might have bi-weekly meetings with the Director of Sales, who helps each sales manager stay on track toward their quarterly goals. Task delegation: Although it can be difficult to relinquish control of projects at first, delegation is a crucial skill for managers to use their time most effectively. As a Director of Rooms, for instance, you might set a goal to increase guest review scores but leave your Front Office Manager in charge of launching an initiative to achieve it. Prioritization: Along with delegating tasks, a good manager can prioritize between the most important tasks and the ones that are less urgent. For example, a restaurant manager might prioritize hiring additional staff leading up to the busy summer season over a fun but less urgent menu redesign project. Scheduling: In industries like hospitality and retail, managers are often responsible for setting their employees’ schedules. A great manager will treat employees fairly and equally when handling time-off requests and shift preferences. Managing cross-functional teams: Managers may also have the opportunity to oversee employees with different work functions and expertise. These cross-functional relationships require the manager to flex her skills to work best with each employee. Risk-taking: Any business endeavor includes at least some degree of risk, like when deciding to try a new idea or even hire a new employee. Managers aren’t afraid to take calculated risks and they know how to evaluate situations to minimize possible consequences. Budgeting: Many leadership roles oversee not only employees, but also budgets. On your resume, you can highlight your budgeting experience by mentioning the size of your annual budget or by how much you decreased operating costs, for example. Forecasting: If you’ve studied historical data to predict what may happen in the future, then you’ve started to build forecasting skills. If you have forecasting experience, you should include the context and the impact of your predictions on the business. Industry certifications: Have you earned any hospitality (or other) industry certifications, such as CRME or CHIA? These certifications add credibility to your resume and set you apart as an expert in your field. Did we miss any key skills to include on a resume? Let us know!

The 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech 2021

by
Hotel Tech Report
1 month ago

Each year Hotel Tech Report surveys thousands of industry insiders to find the best hotel tech jobs and employers globally. In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic wreaked havoc on the hotel industry.  The World Travel and Tourism Council predicts that 121 million of the 330 million jobs tied to tourism around the world will be lost in 2020.  Despite existential challenges, hotels and their vendors have proven resilient in the face of the biggest challenge ever posed to the hospitality industry by working together. But there’s always opportunity in crisis.  The pandemic has advanced digitization in the global economy by at least 5 years according to most experts.  Hotels that already had adopted technology like contactless check-in and guest messaging software have had a massive advantage since the pandemic broke out and the importance of technology for running a successful hotel business will continue to rise over the coming years meaning that demand for hotel technology talent will grow with it. Here at Hotel Tech Report, we’ve interviewed countless hoteliers about their journeys from being hoteliers into lucrative technology careers like Del Ross, Marco Benvenuti, Sameer Umar, and Kevin Brown. For hoteliers furloughed on the sidelines, there is an unprecedented opportunity to pivot into a technology career leveraging skills and knowledge from hospitality experience.   But which hotel tech companies should you apply to? Every year we do the hard work for you and survey thousands of hotel tech professionals to find the best companies to work for in the hospitality industry. We ask respondents to rate their employers from 1-10 on these key variables:  Work-life balance Personal development opportunities Gender equality Confidence in company direction Values alignment 2021 Bonus Question: Rate your firm’s COVD-19 crisis response Hotel Tech Report creates this list each year for two reasons: (1) to help industry professionals find the best hospitality tech jobs and (2) to help hotel tech buyers understand that it’s just as important to partner with great organizations as it is to find great software tools and products. Vendor culture is important to every aspect of a vendor relationship: Product: Great workplaces attract the best talent who make the best products Customer Support: Happy client reps give better service and stay around longer developing deeper relationships. Sales: When a sales team has high turnover, innovation gets strangled because there isn’t enough cash coming in the door to invest in innovation. Our 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech list features companies who foster wonderful work environments for employees.  In return, those employees deliver incredible products and services to clients. Without further adieu here are 2021’s 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech…     10. Siteminder (TIE) Right before the coronavirus pandemic broke out, industry leader Siteminder reached an incredible milestone earning itself unicorn status.  Under the stewardship of CEO Sankar Narayan the firm quickly composed itself when the pandemic broke out and began rolling out initiatives to support both employees and customers like its World Hotel Index sharing real-time data with the industry when historical data just wouldn’t cut it.  Siteminder has an internal slack channel called #stayingsocial dedicated strictly to team members having a social communal space in the age of remote work.  This is pretty typical for a small startup but much rarer in the world of 700 employee behemoths.  The great part about working at a large startup-like Siteminder is that there’s almost limitless upward mobility according to one employee working in operations at the firm, “They allow me opportunities to take on more responsibilities that are even beyond my scope to develop my skills and prep me up for bigger roles. They also give leadership training to enhance to continue developing my capabilities.”  If you’re looking for a fast-paced global startup on a world domination path - then you should absolutely be dropping a resume at Siteminder.  The best part is that they’ve got offices all around the world so even if you prefer the WFH life your colleagues shouldn’t be too far away no matter where you call home.     10. Atomize (TIE) This is Atomize’s first time making Hotel Tech Report’s annual Best Places to Work list but we doubt it will be their last.  In true Swedish fashion Atomize rates amongst the highest on the list for gender equality with a 50% ratio of men to women on its leadership team.  Atomize also rates very highly for culture alignment with a score of 97.8%.  Perhaps the biggest standout for Atomize was how highly employees rated the firm’s COVID-19 response and support for clients during a crisis.  “Everyone from finance to product development has chipped in to try to support clients. We have for instance developed a relief-program for those that are hurting really bad, we have updated the product to amend for the large drop in occupancy for hotels, etc,” one Atomize executive told Hotel Tech Report.  Atomize made it through COVID-19 without a single layoff which is a testament to the longevity of the business and its and commitment to team members.  During the crisis Atomize stayed calm, launched the 2.0 version of their core RMS product, and even found time to bring the team together for a BBQ this summer during a slow down in transmission rates.     9. Hotel Effectiveness Georgia (the U.S. state not the country) based Hotel Effectiveness is in the business of helping hotel owners more efficiently manage labor but the question is: how well do they manage their own labor? It turns out they do a pretty darned good job at fostering internal culture.  Prior to the pandemic labor costs were the biggest focus area for most hotel ownership and management groups - despite the shift in focus Hotel Effectiveness managed to grow through the pandemic all while placing a heavy emphasis on quality of life for employees.  Team members cite a high percentage of employees being groomed from junior roles into leadership positions, flexible PTO programs, and strong opportunities for women.  PTO is great but Hotel Effectiveness management goes one step further where they encourage team members to completely unplug and not even check email during their vacation.  Adding icing to the cake, employees raved about the firm’s response to COVID-19 where it was able to grow without any layoffs needed.  One engineer raved about the Company’s COVID-19 response, “Hotel Effectiveness immediately shifted priorities specifically to address the changing needs of our clients. Hotel Effectiveness provided new guidance materials, payment options, and built new features (such as Daily Wellness Check-In) under tight deadlines to meet the new needs of our customers.”     8. EasyWay Big congrats to the first-ever Israeli startup to make this list!  If you’ve ever been to Tel Aviv or the Start-up Nation (Israel), perhaps a job interview with EasyWay is the excuse you needed to visit one of the most amazing cities in the world packed with beautiful beaches, vibrant nightlife, and a foodie scene that’s truly in a league of its own.  EasyWay is the quintessential startup with a mentality that so long as you hit your KPIs - the rest of your life is totally flexible.  An EasyWay executive’s quote to Hotel Tech Report about the last 12-months at the company says it all, “The work around the clock in the COVID-19 time was crazy.  We have developed so much stuff, that I almost miss this period. We've learned a lot from that, and staid on our feet! The rest of the team was great and it really gave me confidence in my own abilities.  If you're the kind of person who likes to work hard and play hard - you’d be wise to check out EasyWay’s open positions.      7. Asksuite This is Asksuite’s second year making the list and true to their commercial team’s motto “rockets don’t have reverse”, even a pandemic couldn’t slow down this high flying Brazilian startup.  Florianopolis may not be a hotel tech hub (yet) but the Asksuite team has access to lessons in language, hospitality and other training to upskill their way into global domination.  During the pandemic, leaders have made themselves available for 1:1 meetings to support all colleagues and perhaps it’s this close communication that leads Asksuite employees to rate 98% confidence in the future success of the firm.  Asksuite employees frequently cite an onboarding process that makes all team members feel like a part of the family in short order.     6. RoomRaccoon Despite the pandemic RoomRaccoon doubled the firm’s headcount in 2020 and achieved a major milestone in reaching 1,000 clients.  Employees frequently cite similar aspects of the culture as differentiators like their annual international week at the Netherlands headquarters and an inclusive onboarding program.  One employee within the marketing department told Hotel Tech Report, “This year RoomRaccoon decided to start hiring more new colleagues against the market trend of furlough and letting people go. To smoothen the onboarding process of our new hires we've created an E-learning program and two intensive onboarding weeks. So far we've onboarded 15 new hires since July 2020 that immediately are getting results. Something I'm really proud of!”  If you’re looking for an ambitious organization with a strong remote culture and complementary annual trips to the Netherlands - don’t hesitate and check out open listings at RoomRaccoon.     5. Alliants The Alliants story is the cure to the common venture funded business gone wrong story.  Alliants built the business developing custom software for ultra luxury hotel brands like Four Season and Jumeirah before ever dipping their toes into the SaaS world.  That means they’ve got killer products, an eye for design and engineering to back it up.  Starting in a consultative role for luxury brands has afforded Alliants a luxury not many early stage SaaS products have - cash flow.  How would this impact you when you apply for a role there?  Alliants employees are given a $5,000 stipend to invest in their own education and training.  Whether it’s a paid marketing course or intro to Ruby on Rails - at Alliants you will be able to create your own journey and take control of your destiny.  Have you ever had a boss block your calendar so people can’t book meetings with you? Well, Alliants employees have.  During winter months with less daylight, CEO Tristan Gadsby blocked the entire team’s calendars from 11:30am - 1:30pm to encourage team members to get outside, walk or simply catch some rays.  If that doesn’t sell you I don’t know what will.     4. ALICE This ain’t ALICE’s first rodeo, well it’s their fourth if we want to be precise about it.  ALICE has made Hotel Tech Report’s Best Places to Work list 4 years in a row (2018, 2019, 2020, 2021).  ALICE is an incredible place to work for former hoteliers because employees truly act as a strategic extension of their partner properties.  During the pandemic, ALICE quickly pivoted to rollout closure checklists and other free assets to help partners quickly reconfigure their operations for the new normal.  “The most memorable achievement while working at ALICE this past year was being able to provide support for our employees during the pandemic. The pandemic-related fatigue and anxiety impacted everyone and in different ways. We were able to provide support to our employees through group therapy sessions, health and wellness initiatives, increased one-on-one check-ins regarding fatigue, increased opportunities for learning and connection with one another virtually. I am so proud of how the leadership at ALICE has led us through the most difficult time in our industry's history, and with such care for both our customers, our industry as a whole, and our employees,” says one ALICE team member in an HR role.  Just as important as supporting clients through COVID-19 is supporting colleagues.  ALICE team members were constantly comforted that management understood the stress and challenges they were facing during this historic yet tragic year, encouraging an environment of transparency and honesty about how to cope with natural distractions from work in times of stress.     3. hotelkit Austria-based hotelkit is another repeat visitor on this list moving up from 4th to 3rd place.  Founded in 2012 by hotelier Marius Donhauser, hotelkit is a majority female-run business that’s growing rapidly but responsibly throughout Europe.  hotelkit’s team motto is “one team one dream” and while the team had to work remotely for a good portion of the year, colleagues are hopeful that 2021 will bring back the annual hotelkit Christmas party famous for great eats and poker.  Under Marius’ leadership, hotelkit has fostered a culture that feels like family so it’s no wonder that employees rate the culture so highly across every single vector.     2. Cloudbeds Cloudbeds may be the fastest-growing hotel tech company right now so while their headquarters are in sunny San Diego the Company has got Silicon Valley energy pumping through its veins.  Not to mention, Cloudbeds is extremely global with local managers in 40 countries. On March 11th (yes that’s right when COVID-19 took the world by storm) Cloudbeds announced the closing of an $80M funding round.  Cloudbeds employees tend to share two main things in common: (1) they are extremely performance-driven and (2) they LOVE to travel. One Cloudbeds employee within the operations department told Hotel Tech Report, “I managed to get promoted on my 1 anniversary day at Cloudbeds, I was so happy and everyone was so attentive to me during this process. Cloudbeds is an amazing company, full of amazing individuals, it's so nice to see the owners in our calls and engaged with us all at all times. I used to think I had worked at good companies, till I met Cloudbeds. This is where I want to stay and grow. It will be hard for any other company to take me from here.”  Cloudbeds has TONS of openings so make sure to browse their career page if you’re in the market.     1. Mews This is Mews’ 3rd year making the list ranking #2 in 2019 and #3 in 2020 - but this is their first year topping the list which is a testament to the strong culture at the firm.  Like most fast-growing companies, the pandemic wreaked havoc on projections and business plans for Mews leading to some difficult decisions needing to be made.  Mews not only came through what was maybe the darkest moment in the history of the hotel industry but came out stronger than ever before.  Mews leadership set a strong course for the business cutting expenses, reorganizing the team, rebranding, focusing on remote deployments, and even making an acquisition.  Quite a busy year - even if things had been normal.  Mews management has created one of those infectious startup cultures that can almost feel cult-like at times often intoxicating entire trade show floors (pre-COVID).  It’s not often that employees at an aggressive high-performance tier 1 venture-backed business get to see their founder dancing through a town hall (affectionately named Mews Con) in a silly costume.  Mews pivoted from hyper-growth mode into a sharp focus on profitability right-sizing the business and is poised to come out of the pandemic far stronger than it went in.  Lots of open roles to check out and we’re sure that list will continue to grow over the coming months.  

Cloudbeds, SiteMinder & Room Raccoon Top People’s Choice Awards in the 2021 HotelTechAwards

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Hotel Tech Report
1 month ago

Each year along with individual awards for the top-rated hotel software in each category, Hotel Tech Report recognizes the Top 10 most customer-centric global companies in the annual People's Choice Awards. The People's Choice Awards serve to honor and recognize companies who have balanced strong growth with a relentless focus on customer-centricity. The HotelTechAwards platform (by Hotel Tech Report) leverages real customer data to determine best of breed products and companies that help hoteliers grow their bottom lines. “The People’s Choice Award goes to a single company across all categories who demonstrates the strongest customer relationships during the HotelTechAwards.  Cloudbeds had more than 550 hotelier customers come out to share overwhelmingly positive feedback about Cloudbeds products in the midst of a global pandemic.  To have that kind of support from clients during the most challenging market in hotel history says all you need to know about Cloudbeds’ commitment to their partner properties,” says Hotel Tech Report CEO Jordan Hollander. Here’s the Official 2021 People’s Choice List: Cloudbeds SiteMinder RoomRaccoon Bookassist OTA Insight ALICE IDeaS Avvio Hoteltime hotelkit The key factors used to determine the annual People’s Choice Award include total verified customer reviews, geographic reach of reviews, and overall review sentiment and ratings. The best companies know that the most effective way to communicate their value proposition is to empower and amplify the voices of their happy customers.  The People’s Choice Award recognizes companies whose customers really value the relationship and partnership. “Twenty years ago we lived in a world where hoteliers just used one of the three or four technology systems out there and typically just ended up using whatever system they had heard of before.  Today there are thousands of SaaS choices in the market and dozens of great options available for most use cases but the market is moving so quickly that it’s hard for hoteliers to identify and keep track of the best products and companies.  This award honors the companies whose hotel customers are the most vocal advocates of their products to make that process easy,” says Hollander.   About the 2021 People's Choice Award The People's Choice Awards serve to honor and recognize companies who have balanced strong growth with a relentless focus on customer-centricity.  Early on as a startup, it’s easier for companies to maintain strong customer relationships with a limited customer base. But as a company grows its install base and scales globally, maintaining high customer satisfaction becomes increasingly more challenging.  Each year along with individual awards for the top-rated product in each category, Hotel Tech Report recognizes the top 10 most customer-centric global companies in the annual People's Choice Awards acknowledging the achievements of top innovators across all categories who embody the values, transparency, and customer-centricity that lie at the core of truly great companies. View Ranking Methodology>>

Winners of the 2021 HotelTechAwards Announced

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Hotel Tech Report
1 month ago

Hotel Tech Report has announced winners in the 2021 HotelTechAwards, based on more than 10,000 hotel software product reviews contributed by verified hoteliers during the competition.  Winners are selected based on key performance metrics including product popularity, customer satisfaction, integration compatibility, customer support quality, and more.  Winning a HotelTechAward is the highest achievement in the hotel technology industry. “In the midst of a global pandemic, 318,466 hoteliers visited Hotel Tech Report from every corner of the globe contributing 10,227 verified new product reviews during the 3-month awards period to share insights about their favorite tech products to run and grow their businesses.  It has been inspiring to see this massive wave of hoteliers sharing technology insights and product recommendations,” says Jordan Hollander, CEO of Hotel Tech Report. “This is the most comprehensive dataset around hotelier preferences ever developed and it gives unprecedented insights into tech trends for hotels during a pivotal moment in history.  Winning a HotelTechAward is a huge feat with the 2021 competition being the most competitive year ever.  Every company on this list should be extremely proud of what they've contributed to the growth of the hotel industry.” During the HotelTechAwards, hoteliers from the world's leading hotel companies review the top tech products used at their hotels to increase operating efficiency, drive revenue, and improve the guest experience. This data is used to identify the best hotel tech products and organizations. "The HotelTechAwards  are the only prize in the industry that is completely and transparently customer-driven — it's the hoteliers that decide who is best, and it's their opinion that matters most." Gautam Lulla, CEO at Pegasus. "We at SiteMinder believe strongly in the essence of openness; it is what underpins the very core of what we stand for, and the HotelTechAwards, through the program's data-driven and transparent process, aligns firmly with this value.” - Sankar Narayan, CEO at SiteMinder “This honor has deep, personal meaning as it is decided upon by our clients and represents our passion and focus for providing the most sophisticated revenue technology and comprehensive support.” Dr. Ravi Mehrotra Founder at IDeaS “The HotelTechAwards are a powerful stamp of approval for any company to possess and for hoteliers to trust. We value the HotelTechAwards process, which collects thousands of verified reviews from around the world each year.” Alex Shashou, Co-Founder at ALICE “HotelTechReport is the leading platform for technology in the hotel industry, and its meticulous and impartial verification process makes this one of the most prestigious awards.” Moritz von Petersdorff-Campen, Co-Founder at SuitePad The competition spans core areas of hotel software & technology: marketing, revenue, operations, and guest experience. 2021 Voting included participation from major hotel groups including Four Seasons, Hilton, Marriott, Accor Hotels, Hyatt, Intercontinental, Rosewood, and thousands of independents. "We originally created the HotelTechAwards as a democratized way to help our fellow hoteliers quickly determine best of breed vendors based on data they can trust and the scope of the competition this year is a testament to how far the industry has come in the last decade.  The HotelTechAwards rating process is simple, transparent, and unbiased--judging is based on time tested ranking factors, publicly available data, and crowdsourced insights from verified hoteliers who have hands-on experience with each product.” The HotelTechAwards are often referred to as "the Grammys of Hotel Tech" and winners were selected from the top technology products around the world. The HotelTechAwards are the industry's only data-driven awards platform with winners determined not by a handful of judges or popularity votes but by a global community comprised of thousands of verified hotel technology users across more than 127 countries.   Best Hotel Software Companies List >>

2021 HotelTechAwards Finalists Announced

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Hotel Tech Report
1 month ago

Hotel Tech Report has announced finalists in the 2021 HotelTechAwards, based on more than 10,000 hotel software product reviews from verified hoteliers during the competition.  Finalists are selected based on key performance metrics like product popularity, customer satisfaction, integration compatibility, customer support quality, and more.  Winning a HotelTechAward is the highest achievement in the hotel technology industry. “In the midst of a global pandemic, 318,466 hoteliers visited Hotel Tech Report from every corner of the globe contributing over 10,000 verified new product reviews during the 3-month awards period to share insights about their favorite software products.  It has been inspiring to see this massive wave of hoteliers sharing technology insights and product recommendations,” says Jordan Hollander, CEO of Hotel Tech Report. “This is the most comprehensive dataset around hotelier preferences ever developed and it gives unprecedented insights into tech trends for hotels during a pivotal moment in history.  Finaling in the HotelTechAwards is a reflection of quality every company on this list should be extremely proud of what they've contributed to the growth of the hotel industry.” Hotel Tech Report authenticates reviews through a strict verification process.  Further, companies are ranked based on pre-defined objective data variables to avoid the biases present in other human judged competitions. "Based on real and honest customer feedback, the HotelTechAwards really do provide the most transparent view on how technology is perceived and used across the industry,” says Sean Fitzpatrick, CEO at OTA Insight. The HotelTechAwards are often referred to as "the Grammys of Hotel Tech" and finalists are selected from more than 1,000 of the top technology products around the world. The HotelTechAwards are the industry's only data-driven awards platform with winners determined not by a handful of judges or popularity votes but by a global community comprised of thousands of verified hotel technology users across more than 120 countries.   -- Competition winners will be publicly announced on January 12th --   Best Guest Experience Technology Finalists Guest Messaging Software: Whistle, EasyWay, Monscierge Guest Room Tablets: SuitePad, INTELITY Guest Survey Software: TrustYou, Guestrevu, Revinate Hospitality TV Providers: Monscierge (Apple TV) Mobile Key: ASSA ABLOY Global Solutions, FLEXIPASS Mobile Ordering: Bbot, RoomOrders Hotel Guest Apps: ALICE, INTELITY, Wishbox   Best Operations Software Finalists Property Management Systems: Cloudbeds, Mews, Clock PMS+, HotelTime Staff Collaboration: hotelkit, Monscierge, ALICE Hotel Management Systems: RoomRaccoon, Cloudbeds Concierge Software: ALICE Cyber Security & Fraud Prevention: Canary Technologies, Sertifi Digital Signage: Monscierge Housekeeping Software: hotelkit, ALICE, Optii Marketplaces & Integrators: Hapi, Dailypoint Preventive Maintenance: hotelkit, ALICE, Transcendent Restaurant Management: HotelTime, Oracle MICROS POS Employee Engagement Software: hotelkit, Hotel Effectiveness, Beekeeper Contactless Check-in: EasyWay, Canary Technologies, Wishbox Spa Management: HotelTime   Best Revenue Management & Finance Software Finalists Revenue Management Systems: IDeaS, Duetto, Atomize Business Intelligence: OTA Insight, Duetto, ProfitSword Central Reservations Systems: Pegasus Channel Managers: SiteMinder, Cloudbeds, D-EDGE Parity Management: OTA Insight, RateGain Rate Shopping & Market Intelligence: OTA Insight, SiteMinder, RateGain Reporting & Accounting: M3, MyDigitalOffice Upselling Software: Oaky, GuestJoy, EasyWay   Best Marketing Tech Finalists Booking Engines: Cloudbeds, Bookassist, SiteMinder Hotel CRM & Email Marketing: Revinate, Profitroom, Dailypoint Digital Marketing Agencies: Bookassist, Avvio, Net Affinity Direct Booking Tools: Triptease, Hotelchamp Website Live Chat and Chatbot: Asksuite, Whistle Independent Loyalty Programs: The GuestBook Metasearch & Ad Tech: Bookassist, Avvio, Koddi Reputation Management: TrustYou, Guestrevu, Revinate Hotel Website Design: Bookassist, Avvio, Profitroom   Best Meetings & Events Tech Finalists Event Management Software: Event Temple Group Sourcing & RFP Software: MeetingPackage, Venuesuite Meetings Intelligence Software: Duetto, IDeaS Sales CRM: Event Temple, MeetingPackage  

Consider this Before Getting a Hotel and Restaurant Management Degree

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Hotel Tech Report
2 days ago

Choosing a career path is a big deal. And deciding whether or not to pursue a bachelor's degree is a major part of that career plan. So what to do during a pandemic --  especially when you’ve been considering getting a bachelor's degree in Hospitality Management (hotel and restaurant management)?  You’d be right to take a minute to consider whether or not pursuing a degree in hospitality is really worth it, given that hospitality has been hit especially hard by the pandemic and there are tons of low-cost online accreditations available today. There are a few key areas to explore, such as the outlook for the industry, what you’ll learn, and what marketable skills you’ll get from your investment in the degree. From there, you can make an educated decision about whether or not a hospitality degree is right for you.   Key Considerations When Deciding to Pursue a Hotel and Restaurant Management Degree Like anything in business (or life) there is a cost and a benefit calculation you'll need to make to decide which path to pursue.  The cost side of the equation includes both the direct expenses of higher education like tuition as well as the opportunity cost (i.e. how much money would you be making during those years if you went straight to work?).  Hospitality and tourism management school tuition varies widely based on pedigree (reputation of the school) and location.  A Bachelor of Science in International Hospitality Management from EHL costs around $206k (188 CHF) over 4 years including food and accommodation.  According to NerdWallet's student loan calculator a $200,000 loan with 5% interest and a 10-year term requires $2,121.31 in monthly payments.  That doesn't necessarily mean that you need to make $25,000 per year more from year 1 but you should expect that over the long run the difference in salary helps to more than offset the cost of a degree.  Let's use a stylized example to illustrate this point: you are considering whether to leave high school and go straight to becoming a hotel concierge to refine your skills and ultimately become a hotel manager.  The average full-time hotel concierge or guest services manager makes from $23,000-$38,000 per year.  Let's say, for simplicity, it will take you 10 years working your way up as a concierge before you can become a hotel manager without a degree.  During those 10-years you would make $300,000 using an average of $30,000 per year salary. Hotel managers typically make from $61,000-$200,000 per year. Now let's say that with a degree from EHL it would only take you 3-years as a concierge to become a hotel manager.  That means in years 1-4 you spend (-) $200,000 on education.  Then in years 5-7 you make $90,000.  Finally in years 8-10, you make $210,000.  In this scenario, you would have netted $100,000 in salary so all else equal you would be better off without the degree. This example is designed to stylize the decision-making process, not to tell you whether or not you should get a degree.  What if EHL grads make more as hotel managers than non-grads? Are there other long term benefits of a degree like the potential to move into higher-paying corporate management roles? Are there networking and alumni opportunities that must be factored in?  Will you get paid real-world experience with your degree or exposure to differentiated entrepreneurship coursework that are otherwise inaccessible to those without one?  Do you need the degree program to be eligible in the future for a Masters in Business Administration (MBA) and unlock even higher salaries in the future?  Are there financial aid packages or scholarships available to lower your expense levels? The first step to answering this question is plotting out what you think the future looks like and then going out to validate your hypotheses by talking to real people who work in the hospitality business.  Ultimately this exercise will show you that there is no black and white answer, these calculations vary dramatically based on which segment of hospitality you aim to work in.  It probably doesn't make sense to attend EHL at full tuition in order to get into foodservice or entry-level guest service roles but it may be the only way to grow into a business management role VP level or higher at brands like Marriott and Hilton.   What’s The Outlook for Travel and Hospitality? The pandemic has put industry forecasts into disarray. What had been shaping up to be another strong year in a decade-long boom of travel and tourism turned into quite the opposite. Travel has flatlined and things are changing so fast that it’s hard to get a grasp on the industry’s future prospects.  One of the most reliable forecast sources is STR, which tracks the health of the hospitality industry. STR’s Data Insights Blog has been tracking the regional and global impact of COVID. The bad news is that STR predicts a long road ahead, with recovery back to 2019 levels not happening until 2023. That’s a long way away; but as we’ll see below, this long road to recovery can be an advantage to those just starting out in their careers.   The good news is that industry fundamentals remain strong. People love to travel. And, even though it’s likely that business travel will be slower to return (and may forever be changed), the industry’s gradual recovery provides ample opportunity for career advancement.   What Marketable Skills Will I Learn?  The value of a hospitality management degree lies not just in the future career opportunities but also and be marketable skills that you will learn. There are four core areas that a hospitality management program will cover:  Operations. First and foremost, you will learn the ins-and-outs of the business of hospitality. This includes all day-to-day aspects of hotel operations: checking guests in at the front desk, managing guest requests in the back of the house, scheduling staff,  Revenue. The business of running a hotel involves three key departments: sales, marketing, and revenue management. You’ll learn how each department contributes to a property’s topline revenue and bottom-line profitability. Increasingly, these departments are overlapping and so it’s helpful to have a grasp across all aspects of a hotel’s revenue-generating roles. People management. One of the most important skills for any hospitality professional on the management track is people and human resources. It’s a critical piece of any job in hotels because there are so many people to manage. You’ll learn about what it takes to manage a workforce, including performance management, hiring and training staff to meet service standards. Customer service. The essence of hospitality is customer service. This is the most practical skill that you will learn, as people skills will always come into handy. With the practical hands-on training of a Hospitality Management degree, you'll get  Leadership. Many college degrees struggle to include a hands-on component that teaches you real-world leadership. You can go through college for four years and end up without any practical experience. All of the best hospitality management programs include an internship component of part of the graduation requirements. This means that you will have hands-on experience in an actual business upon graduation. So even if you decide not to go into hospitality, you'll be able to translate your real work experience into conversation points for your job interviews.   What Can I Do with a Bachelors in Hotel and Restaurant Management?  The most obvious career path involves a role in hospitality. Your potential path with a hospitality management degree may include roles in a few different departments, such as: Operations: The operations of a hotel include the front desk, housekeeping, maintenance, and day-to-day management. Roles here include managing a department, such as the front-of-house or housekeeping, and culminate in a job as a general manager.  Revenue: Sales, marketing, and revenue management are responsible for generating business for the hotel. There are many roles here to consider:  Revenue manager,  HR: One of the core back-office functions at a hotel is HR. This could be both at the property level and corporate level. HR managers are responsible for people operations:  overseeing the hiring, firing, and performance management process so that everything is legal and according to company standards; handling employee complaints and generally being an advisor and resource to employees across the operation. Accounting: Another core back-office function is accounting. These employees are the ones that manage the financial inflows and outflows from property (or group of properties).  Most roles in this specialization require a further degree in accounting, so keep that in mind if you want to pursue a dual degree alongside hospitality management. Business Development/Finance: Business development involves finding locations for new hotels, evaluating the financial feasibility of acquiring existing hotels, and working on the financial side of the industry. Someone with a hospitality management degree working in business development has a very unique skill-set but maybe in high demand. Gaming: Casinos have a very unique footprint and require their own set of skills. Specializing in gaming can give you a competitive advantage in certain circumstances,  especially if you're interested in working in a hotel market with a heavy gaming component, such as Las Vegas. Also, if you are interested in gaming, it makes sense to strongly consider UNLV’s hospitality program! Food and beverage: Many properties have expensive food and beverage operations. There are many aspects to manage here, from room service and catering to individual outlets, which means that F&B offers many opportunities (both in and outside of hotel-affiliated outlets). The skills you learn from your degree in hospitality management are transferable to other areas as well. A graduate with a strong grasp of management, leadership, and operations will be well-positioned for other roles too. Some related roles to consider: Hospitality tech: Expertise in hospitality is in especially high demand with technology companies serving the industry.  You could translate your hospitality management degree into an entry-level role at one of these companies, which will put you on a career path in the technology industry. Account manager/sales manager. Sales and account management requires a lot of soft skills that you'll learn when you get a degree in hospitality. There are also many entry-level jobs in these two fields -- especially for those with strong sales and people skills.  HR. People management is an essential part of any company. Put your organizational and operations knowledge to work, alongside your interpersonal soft skills, in HR. Management training: Your degree is a signal that you are organized and capable of. You could also look for a role in a different industry that come on a management training track. Hospitality consultants: There are many firms that serve hotels and Hospitality brands as contractors and independent hospitality consultants. If you wanted to tackle a broader array of challenges for multiple clients, this could be a great choice for you. Event planning: Event planners don't necessarily have to be on staff at a conference center attached to a hotel. From independent wedding planners to corporate event specialists, you could put your hospitality knowledge to use as an event planner. See more in our in-depth guide to hospitality careers, including job descriptions, salaries, and more.   How Do I Choose a Hospitality Management Program? There's a lot at stake when you choose a hospitality management program. It’s a major investment. A few things to consider as you evaluate programs: Quality: First and foremost, make sure that you are going to a reputable school. A few of the most well-regarded are the Ecole Hôtelière de Lausanne, Cornell University’s School of Hotel Administration, Hotelschool The Hague, and the University of Nevada’s William F. Harrah College of Hotel Administration. For a full list, check out the top hotel schools in our hospitality industry guide. Each school should be evaluated for the quality of instruction and access to industry leaders. You also want teachers that are practicing experts in their field, rather than relics of an industry long gone. Specialization: Next, look carefully at the program’s class offerings. Does the program offer the courses that you need for your career path? Do you see specializations that interest you? Remember that it is not just a general education that matters; you also want to get deep dives into the most marketable skills for today's economy. Make sure that you can get the type of education you need to position yourself for success. Network:  Major part of the investment is getting access to a quality Alumni network that can help you find jobs once you graduate. It might seem far away, but you’ll want to leverage the power of the university’s network when you're looking for a job. And also: a career office that can connect you to the best job opportunities. Some notable alumni from the top schools: Cornell: Andrew Tisch, head of Loews Hotels; Will Guidara, restaurateur of Eleven Madison Park and NoMad and TV personality Aida Mollenkamp.  UNLV: Marco Benvenuti, co-founder of hospitality tech company Duetto; hotel-casino mogul George Maloof; Bill Hornbuckle, president of MGM Resorts International; Celebrity Chef and Restauranteur Guy Fieri. EHL: Daisy Soros, philanthropist; Craig Claiborne, New York Times restaurant critic; Georges Plassat, businessman. Hotelschool: Joris Bijdendijk, Dutch celebrity chef; Marc Bolland, businessman and CEO of Marks and Spencer; Erik Tengen, founder and CEO of Oaky.   Cost: Finally, you want to make sure that the cost is worth it! Sticker shock is understandable, especially in the United States where college costs have skyrocketed. Look at the overall cost of the program tuition, as well as related cost-of-living, and measure against the income potential for your career. See next section, as this is usually a top criteria under consideration when deciding on a Hospitality Management program.   How much does a hospitality management degree cost? Out of the criteria listed above, cost is often one of the most important ones.  With the cost of fees and other non-tuition expenses, the total cost of a degree can get quite expensive. As a prospective student, you want to know that your degree will be a good investment. Here's a breakdown of the cost of the best hospitality management programs, followed by a quick calculation you can make to see your return on the investment. Cornell School of Hospitality. Undergraduates can expect to spend $58,586 (out of state) or $58,586 (in state) per year on tuition and around $16,000 on housing and dining. For a Cornell Master in Hospitality degree, expect to spend $87,879 for tuition and around $2,500 per month for books, fees and other living expenses. There are also several scholarships and financing options for those looking to fund the program with federal and private student loans. More on Cornell Hotel School tuition, financing and scholarships here (undergrad) and here (graduate). There’s also a useful financial aid calculator. EHL. The total cost of an undergraduate degree is 197,789 Swiss francs, including housing and health insurance. That cost is less if you are a Swiss citizen or are eligible for a subsidy: “only” 112,010 Swiss francs, also including housing. There are also scholarships for international students and Swiss citizens. More on EHL’s tuition and scholarships here. Hotelschool. One of the more affordable hospitality business schools, tuition for a bachelor's is 24,300 Euros per year for non-Europeans and just 10,360 Euros for Europeans. Other expenses are variable, depending on where you decide to live while on campus. International students can also apply for the Holland Scholarship for students outside of Europe who want to do a Bachelors or Masters in the Netherlands. More on the bachelor program’s costs for non-Europeans here and Europeans here.  University of Nevada. Annual undergraduate tuition costs at UNLV run $8,604 for residents and $24,258 for non-residents. Graduate tuition is $6,517 for residents and $22,171 for non-residents. Depending on whether students live with parents, on-campus or off-campus, non-tuition expenses range from $20,000 to $40,000 per year. For financing the degree, there are both federal and private loans available, as well as scholarships. More on tuition here, with this calculator to estimate total tuition and fees. Of course, the sticker price doesn't necessarily mean that you need to pay out-of-pocket. Each program offers financial aid and scholarships,  so you can take out a combination of loans and perhaps some “free” money to make the program tuition accessible to you, regardless of your personal financial situation. To calculate the return on your investment in a hospitality management degree, you need to first determine what your career path looks like. Review the average salary of hospitality jobs in our hotel industry guide and then calculate a 10% payback rate, a reasonable expectation on repayment. And then divide it by the cost of your degree to calculate how quickly your investment will be repaid. Since the goal of getting a degree is to earn a higher salary (and thus increase your lifetime earnings over your entire career), this helps you compare one program to another. This is just a rough estimate but it is a helpful calculation! ROI= (target role salary*.10)/cost of degree   For instance, let's say that you go to the University of Nevada as a non-resident undergrad and your target role is GM at a boutique hotel. Per our guide, the average salary of a hotel general manager is between $75,000 and $140,000. Take the midpoint of that as $100k, multiply by .10 (assuming that you use 10% of your salary to pay down loans) and divide by an estimated total cost 220,000 for a 4-year program. You get a payback period of 22 years. Of course, that doesn't include any amounts paid out of pocket, scholarships or interest costs. So you should adjust this comparative calculator accordingly, adjusting for your own interest and non-tuition costs.   So...Should I Get A Bachelor’s In Hospitality Management?  Ultimately, the decision is yours. While it may seem like a tough time to go into hospitality, we are bullish on the future of travel and hospitality, especially when the time frame is three to five years out.  So now could be the perfect time to get a degree in hospitality management, as you have two major advantages being early on in your hospitality career: your salary needs are lower and you have plenty of time for the industry to recover. You could take the time to earn your degree and really dive into a specialization that will remain competitive as the industry recovery unfolds. Then, right when you're ready to enter the workforce, you’ll be well-positioned. For instance, you may want to consider focusing on revenue management and marketing, which are marketable skills regardless of industry.  and then you will have more options upon graduation, so you could enter the management track and operations, revenue, or marketing.  Hotels will be doing more with less for the foreseeable future. So you just want to make yourself as competitive as possible if you choose to get a bachelor's in hospitality management. If you use your time earning a degree wisely, develop a broad base of soft skills around collaboration, communication, team building, and leadership, you'll be well-positioned to thrive!   Further Resources Want to learn more about the hospitality industry as you decide if a bachelor’s in hospitality management is right for you? Check out these resources: Our complete guide to the hospitality industry Our complete guide to the hotel management industry A deep dive into the various hospitality careers to consider Everything you need to know about hotel operations Exploring the revenue management career path  

What is a Human Resources Information System (HRIS)?

by
Hotel Tech Report
3 months ago

Whether you're a boutique hotel manager or the owner of an expansive resort, your most important resource is your team members. How do you juggle payroll, paperwork, and performance reviews? Just as a PMS organizes everything related to your property operations, HRIS systems streamline your human resources operations, from benefits administration to HR systems reporting.  Modern HRIS systems are not just used by HR professionals but are so user friendly today that most have employee self-service software solutions that improve the employee experience. In this article, we’ll introduce you to this important software, explain the features it can offer, and explore the benefits your hotel can realize by implementing it. In just a few minutes, you’ll be able to make more informed decisions about your HR organization’s technology needs. With the proper technology partner, you can empower your employees to thrive at work and focus on what matters: providing a great guest experience.   HRIS Software or HRMS: What’s the Difference? A human resources information system, or HRIS, goes by many different names. You may also see it referred to as a human resource management system (HRMS), a talent management system (TMS), or a human capital management system (HCM). All of these acronyms stand for the same thing: a system that centralizes your human resources operations. These systems house your employee database, handle payroll, compile performance reviews, run reports and analytics, and more. Human resources staff use the system on a daily basis, while all employees and managers can access a portal as needed to view payroll information, clock in and out, and track their goals.   What Features Does an HRIS Offer? At a high level, an HRIS helps your human resources team do their jobs better, and it helps employees manage their payroll and performance. But what specific features will you find in an HRIS? Employee database: An HRIS holds your employee database; you can securely store employee information like birthdays, contact details, start date, compensation, contracts, and more for easy access within the system. Time tracking: Hourly employees, like housekeeping staff or restaurant servers, can clock in and out via a module in your HRIS. Integrated, digital timesheets decrease the potential for human error and allow you to analyze human resource data to optimize scheduling. Payroll: Your HRIS can automate the entire payroll process from managing compensation information to disbursing payments. Benefits: The HRIS makes benefits enrollment easy; employees can sign up or change policies in a self-service portal. Employee portal: Employees have access to a self-service dashboard in the HRIS where they can view and manage not only benefits, but also payroll or banking information, goals and performance, an employee database, time off requests, internal job openings, and more. Applicant tracking: Hotels hire frequently, and managing applicants is no easy task. An HRIS can streamline the application process both for the applicant and for your HR team. Some software vendors offer separate applicant tracking systems (ATS), but a comprehensive HRIS will include one. Onboarding and training: You can centralize the onboarding process for new employees in the HRIS to ensure consistency in every new team member’s first few days at your property. Your HRIS can also organize and monitor ongoing training for employees and managers. Performance management: An HRIS often includes functionality for setting goals, tracking performance, providing feedback, and recording notes from performance reviews.  Reporting: With so much data in one central system, the HRIS provides robust reporting features to help you better understand your employee demographics, scheduling needs, benefits use, and more. Some leading HRISs, like Workday and Oracle, include all of these features and more. If your hotel has specific HR software needs, you can also find vendors that provide just one or two of these services. For example, Greenhouse and Lever are applicant tracking systems, so they don’t provide payroll or benefits to hired employees.   Why Use an HRIS? It’s certainly possible to handle benefits and payroll without an HRIS, but that’s not the ideal way to run a human resources organization. Especially in the hospitality industry, where turnover is high and teams are large, an HRIS can deliver efficiency, transparency, and even cost savings. What benefits can you expect when you implement an HRIS? Automation of recurring tasks and data entry, such as payroll, employee records and contracts, so your HR team can spend time on more important and impactful projects. More efficient HR operations by offering self-service access to employees. Instead of contacting HR for assistance enrolling in benefits, checking payroll information, or requesting time off, employees can use the self-service portal. Employees will also appreciate having immediate access to these services. Accuracy across timesheets and payroll by eliminating the chance of human error. Secure storage for employee and financial information - much more secure than a filing cabinet! Digital storage is also less expensive and more eco-friendly than traditional paper employee files. Access to employee, tax, and legal documents to ensure compliance. The HRIS can store various forms of employee documentation, certifications, and contact information should you need it at any time. Clarity into human resource allocation. By analyzing timesheet data, you can optimize scheduling for hourly departments like housekeeping, front desk, and F&B. Happier employees and higher employee engagement. Through the performance management functionalities, managers can better coach and guide their direct reports toward their career goals, which can reduce turnover.   How Do You Choose the Right HRIS? Want to bring the benefits of an HRIS into your hotel's HR management process so that you can streamline employee data (and employee benefits) while improving decision making? Deciding to implement an HRIS is a relatively easy decision; deciding which HRIS can be difficult. When deliberating between the various systems available, it’s important to keep these criteria in mind: Cost - how much do you want to spend? Functionality - which features do you really need? Customer support - do you want hands-on, 24/7 support from the vendor? Industry expertise - while you don't necessarily need your HRIS to be fully customizable you'll want to make sure that it's built for the needs of your HR department.  Hospitality businesses typically have lots of shift labor and part time workers so you'll want to make sure that any system you choose has worked with hotel businesses before. With such a broad range of systems on the market, you’ll find there is also a wide variety in terms of cost and functionality. If you run a small independent hotel, you probably don’t need a system that offers a suite of features for global talent management. On the other hand, if you are deciding which system to implement on a brand or corporate level, then robust reporting tools and support for employees in multiple locations will be crucial. The best way to determine whether an HRIS is right for you is by signing up for a demo or a free trial. Did we miss any key features or benefits that an HRIS can provide? What systems do you recommend? Let us know!  

Hcareers: How to Use the Platform to Find Your Next Hotel Job

by
Hotel Tech Report
7 months ago

Losing a hospitality job is awful. It's one of the most stressful things that can happen. This stress is being felt by so many of our colleagues in the hospitality industry during COVID-19. Many have either been temporarily furloughed or laid off permanently.  The sheer number of layoffs and furloughs, coupled with a recovery still in its early days, has made for a competitive job market.  This is an unprecedented human resources and talent challenge for the industry.  As you look for your next opportunity, one of the most helpful resources is Hcareers, an online job platform exclusively for hotel jobs. On Hcareers, you'll find jobs without having to come through irrelevant listings as you might on another job site. This saves time and reduces frustration, two resources that are often in short supply during a job search.  The platform is so strong that the AHLA (American Hotel & Lodging Association) trusts it to power their own member career center serving both AHLA hospitality employers and hospitality talent.  At the time of writing, Hcareers.com had 48,635 active jobs listed for hospitality professionals. We're living in challenging times, there's no doubt about it. We're all taking it day-by-day, step by step. To help you with your next step, here’s a guide to searching for your next  opportunity on Hcareers. Stay positive and keep at it!   Step 1: Pick your job The homepage gets straight to the point. You'll have to create an account later but for now you can search without one. All you have to do is enter your target keyword and/or your preferred location. As you start to explore new opportunities, try not to be too specific (unless you have to). You may want to learn about different segments, areas or roles that you hadn't considered before. It’s a perfect time to consider new ways to push your career forward!  You can search for jobs across departments, from revenue to F&B, housekeeping and front desk. Hcareers also includes adjacent opportunities outside of the traditional Hotel footprint, such as managing an airport concession, corporate catering and more.     As an example, we're going to search for a general manager role. Let’s say that I'm an assistant hotel manager of a limited-service hotel near the Miami airport but open to roles anywhere in the United States. Right now, I'm less worried about the location and more about furthering my career. Ideally, I'm looking for a promotion --  and I'm willing to take the leap of faith during this uncertain time to get ahead in my career. I'd also like to do something outside of the limited-service category to bolster that part of my resume.  To increase the odds of finding something that may work for me, I’ll get some ideas of similar roles from Hcareers. This helpful auto-complete functionality is a great way to learn about jobs you may not have considered before! I type in “ general manager” and review the suggestions.     As I mentioned, I've been working in management at a limited-service hotel near an airport. So I understand the needs of the business travelers that make up the bulk of our clientele. I'm going to start by looking at that Airport Lounge category.   Step 2: Pick your location Limiting your location will reduce your results. If you absolutely must be near a specific location, enter it here. Otherwise, leave it blank to have the best chance of finding a job that interests you and aligns with your experience and career objectives.     Another benefit of searching without a location at the start of a job search is to deepen your understanding of what’s out there. Are there markets oe industry segments with lots of jobs? By keeping the search wide, you’ll get a better idea of what types of roles are available in different geographies and areas of the industry.   Step 3: Find Jobs Next, I click on find jobs to review the relevant results.  As you can see in the screenshot below, there are a variety of opportunities here; they’re not all airport lounge positions. This is actually one of the great things about Hcareers: it will expose you to other relevant jobs so that you can compare in the same view.     Step 4: Filter for Fit Once you scroll through the results and have a better idea of what would fit with your current goals, use the filters on the left to further target your search. In my case, I'd like a full-time role with a mid-level of experience, and a job listing that’s been posted in the past week. Playing with these filters allows you to see the types of roles that are available at different experience levels,  as well as the recency of the job postings. Older listings may have gone stale I'm going to prioritize recent listings within the past week. Also, if you've been furloughed, there's a filter for temporary jobs. These listings may not be directly in hospitality but could be an option for those looking for employment until the end of a furlough.   Step 5: Register or Log in At this stage, you might as well register for a new account or login. You'll need an account to take advantage of the great features on the individual job listing pages.  For new users, the sign-up flow is only two screens: the first requires an email and the second asks for your first and last names, password, and accepting the Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy. New users will also need to verify identity by clicking on a link in the registration email.     Once your account is set up and you're logged in, you can take full advantage of the individual job listings, which we’ll cover below.   Step 6: Complete Your Profile Before you return to your search, now's a good time to get your profile refreshed and updated. That way you’ll have a  streamlined application process for future jobs. Click your name at the top right of the screen and select “My Profile.” Here you’ll find a measure of your profile completeness to track progress towards a complete profile. Take the time to get that completeness to 100%...it’s worth the investment. Here’s what makes a blank profile looks like:     Start with the Profile tab and add a photo, update your expectations on compensation and job perks, connect your LinkedIn profile and add your recent work experience. You should also consider writing a statement and recording a video; there are lots of people in the job market, so anything that you can do to set yourself apart is worthwhile!  And don’t overlook the section called “ values that define me,” as this is where you can personalize your job search. Hcareers will evaluate potential jobs based on these values and create a personalized score for each job. More on the Personal Score in a bit.      Step 7: Return to Search Once you're logged in and your profile is updated, select “Find Jobs” in the navigation bar to start browsing for jobs. Two things to note as you scroll through available jobs: first, you can save jobs for later by clicking the small “Save” button under each listing. Second, you can click on the hyperlink underneath where it says “a property of” to open  the Employer Profile (more on that later).     To learn more information about a job, you can click the name of the role (such as “General Manager” in the example above) to load the full job listing. This page will give you everything you need to know about the job's responsibilities, as well as its perks, such as 401k match, holidays, health insurance and so on.     Unique to Hcareers, each job listing features a “Personal Score.” This proprietary score rates how well a job aligns with the values you selected on your profile (“Culture Fit”), as well as the compensation (“Salary Fit”). It also rates your experience (“Skill Fit”) for a given role by asking you to share your skills via a job-specific quiz.  For example, a director of engineering will be asked about maintenance expertise while a general manager candidate gets questions related to financial expertise, management and other areas essential to that job.     The more quizzes you take, the better the system gets at knowing whether or not you have the skills for a specific job. To add your skills to a specific job type, click “Update Your Score” on the job listing page to take a quiz related to your experience in that role. Once you take the quiz, you won't have to do it again. You can find your related skills under the “Skills” tab of your profile, which will give you an aggregate view of your qualifications for a specific job. Or, if you don’t have the experience for a specific role, this section will list out the requirements for reference. Looks like I won't be a director of engineering anytime soon!     As you research each lifting, be sure to scroll down to the bottom right of the page for the “Similar Jobs” area. These suggestions can be quite helpful; for example, in my search for a GM role, I learned of a management role at a senior living facility. I hadn't considered that adjacent career path, so I’ll click through and save the job listing for later.     Step 8: Access Your Saved Jobs Once you've saved a few jobs that make sense for you, it's time to start applying to some jobs. Click “My Career in the top navigation bar and then choose “Saved Jobs” to find jobs that you’ve saved.     Once you’re ready to apply, click on the green apply button to get started. As is the case with most job boards, this will push you into the job application process for that specific company. That's just the reality of the job search process. Take a breath, and commit to finishing one application per session. One quirk to note: Hcareers keeps a list of which jobs you've applied for by tracking clients. so if you click on the “Apply” button,  the system will assume that you have completed the application. You'll see a badge Advantage pulao within the search results for any job that you've applied to before. It's going to be up to you to remember if you did not complete the application, as Hcareers will take that click as “Applied For.”     Final Step: The Job Seeker Dashboard Now that you’re a pro, you can take full advantage of Hcareers as a centralized job search dashboard. When you log in, start on your My Career dashboard. In addition to your saved jobs, you’ll also have jobs that you've applied to previously. This is handy for scheduling your follow-ups to hiring managers.  My Career is also where you'll find the jobs recommended by Hcareers. These recommendations improve the more that you use the platform. You may just find your dream job curated and presented to you! As you settle into your search, there are two other useful areas to explore: Career Advice and Employer Profiles. The Career Advice section aggregates hospitality-specific articles and guides to inform your job search. And the employer profile section is a handy resource for browsing individual hotel group and hospitality management company profiles.     In this view, you can see how many jobs a company currently has open, and then click through to learn more information about a particular employer. Each employer profile features a feed of current jobs, links to social media and the company's website, biographies of key executives, as well as more detail on the company's perks, culture and properties. These profiles are a great tool during the research process!     Final Step: Keep At It! Job hunting is rarely fun or exciting. It can often feel like a tedious time suck. By investing the time to create a complete profile on Hcareers, you'll signal to hiring managers that you’re organized and actively looking. Every little bit counts! Remember that employers are doing their homework on you so make sure to vet them for things like company culture and people by reading employee reviews on popular websites like Glassdoor.  There's nothing worse than getting the job and finding out 3-months later that it makes you miserable. It's not a one-way street and job matching based on fit is a huge part of the search process.  By using a platform like Hcareers you'll save time finding the jobs so you can invest more time into vetting companies and curating your applications.   You'll also benefit from the personalized recommendations and hospitality focus, which really sets Hcareers apart from other job search websites. Good luck!  

Hospitality Careers: Job Descriptions, Salaries and Live Opportunities

by
Hotel Tech Report
3 months ago

Considering a role in hospitality? Looking to nurture your hospitality career by taking on new responsibilities or a new role? You've come to the right place. Below, we've broken down all of the various roles and responsibilities across different hospitality departments. You'll see which skills you need to move up the career ladder as well as common career progressions.  We also share hotlinks to live job postings and reviews on popular websites like Hcareers. Armed with this information -- and the hotel management tips and tricks on our blog -- you’ll be ready to nurture your career through this challenging time.  Hospitality professionals have a wide array of opportunities from food services to housekeeping jobs, event manager roles and even the ones you won't find in job postings like c-suite hotel management company positions.  Hotel jobs in particular can be incredibly diverse ranging from menial tasks to advanced data science, part-time to full time and everything in between.   Hospitality Jobs, Descriptions and Career Paths Hospitality management career opportunities are broken down into two buckets: the front office (front of house), which has direct contact with the public, and the back office (back of house), which includes support roles with less frequent frontline contact. For larger brands, and franchises, many back office roles are centralized off-property and have purview over multiple properties.  While we focus on the hotel segment many of these roles are similar across cruise ship, restaurants and all facets of the industry. Here we break down the various hospitality roles and responsibilities, along with key skills that you need to thrive in each of these roles, as well as the potential career path. Many corporate roles, such as marketing, finance and sales, earn more responsibility by moving from a single property to a cluster, where the role oversees that function across several properties.  In order to get into higher paying corporate roles you'll need at least a high school diploma and likely a bachelor's degree (ideally from a hospitality school).  Having said that, even some of the most advanced roles and management positions can be achieved without fancy degrees through proper job training and determination. Also, larger properties will see more atomization of these roles. A hotel in Times Square with 2,000 rooms will need more housekeeping shift supervisors whereas a smaller hotel with only 50 rooms may have just one housekeeping manager overseeing the department. As far as skills required, we've added some specific to each row. These are in addition to the essential traits of any hospitality employee: problem-solving, customer service, effective use of technology and time management, among others. There are dozens of wonderful career paths so skip to the category that's most relevant for you: Front of House Back of House Revenue Management Sales & Marketing Hospitality Management   FRONT OF HOUSE HOSPITALITY JOBS       Front Desk Agent/Clerk The front desk agent is responsible for checking guests in and out, keeping the front desk area tidy in the lobby clean and fielding guest requests on the phone and in-person. They also contribute around the hotel as needed.  This is often an entry-level role and doesn't require any specific skills, beyond authentic customer service, a desire to learn and a lack of tardiness. Career-minded front desk agents could eventually become shift supervisors and then assistant managers, front-of-house managers, and other management roles within the property. [Explore job data for Front Desk Agents on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Reservations Agent Reservations Agents handle everything related to guest reservations, so just handling phone calls for new reservations, updating existing reservations, and answering guest communications via email, phone and other channels.  This may be an entry-level role but still requires emotional intelligence, as well as patience, customer service, follow-through and the ability to focus and stay on task with limited oversight. A Reservations Agent could cross-train on the front desk and then move onto the management track. [Explore job data for Reservations Agents on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   F&B Director The Food and Beverage Director is responsible for managing the frontline staff and mid-level managers of the food and beverage outlets on-site. Depending on the size of the property, the F&B Director can manage anywhere from a few to dozens of employees. This person can do anything from running interviews with potential new employees, developing new menus with kitchen and bar staff, working with marketing on promotions, doing performance evaluations and handling customer service issues. The F&B Director is the primary liaison to upper management and attends regular management meetings. Often, the Food and Beverage Director has worked her way up from frontline roles at restaurants and bars. As a career, the Director can transition into a larger property with more responsibilities and staff, open a new hotel’s outlets or seek out a GM role.  [Explore job data for F&B Directors on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Assistant F&B Director As the assistant to the F&B Director, this person contributes to the day-to-day operations of food and beverage outlets. This can mean working supervisor shifts and generally supplementing the work of their boss. This role is often promoted up through frontline staff and has aspirations to become a director and move into managing larger food and beverage outlets either at a hotel or elsewhere. [Explore job data for Assistant F&B Directors on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Outlet Manager This role manages the daily operations of an on-property outlet. Do this could be a spa manager, bar manager or restaurant manager. These roles are most often found on larger properties with more amenities. Responsibilities vary depending on the outlet; this person will be responsible for hiring and firing, scheduling staff, handling customer service and monitoring overall performance. An outlet manager usually has three to five years of experience in a related service sector, with some management experience prior to arriving at the hotel.  And all that manager may aspire to become a Director of Operations, Director Of Food And Beverage, or another director-level role. [Browse open Outlet Managers roles on Hcareers]   Executive Chef The Executive Chef is responsible for all food that is served on site. This can include banquets, meetings, food and beverage outlets, room service and even external catering. Most often found in larger properties with bigger budgets (and greater operational need), the Executive Chef leads a team that may include multiple Sous Chefs, a Banquets/Events Chef, and a Pastry Chef, with each of those people responsible for different areas of food and beverage operations. As the head of the kitchen, the Executive Chef may also be asked to participate in pitches for large conferences and events, and have a much more public-facing role than other kitchen managers. The Executive Chef may move on from a single property to a hotel group as an Area Executive Chef, or even to a restaurant group or corporate entity.   [Explore job data for Executive Chefs on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   BACK OF HOUSE HOSPITALITY JOBS     Accountant The hotel accountant manages all aspects of a hotel’s finances, from processing payroll to reconciling income and expenses, paying taxes and creating reports for management. This person will also spend time presenting these reports and working with management to understand the drivers behind the numbers.  Accountants need a specialized college degree and will need different levels of experience, depending on the hotel’s size and revenue.  for an accountant just out of college, a smaller property would be the best place to start, while a more experienced accountant will look for a larger hotel group. Accounting principles generally translate well across industries, although specialized industry knowledge enhances competitiveness in the labor market. In addition to strong financial management and sound judgment, a great hotel accountant has forensic skills to track down discrepancies and investigate the story behind the numbers.  A successful accountant also needs the ability to communicate about numbers in an understandable way to others. An accountant could become a Director of Finance or an accountant role elsewhere, such as moving up to a larger property with more responsibilities or in another industry entirely as a VP of Accounting.  [Explore job data for Accountants on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Night Auditor A hotel's Night Auditor audits each day’s financial transactions, such as reconciling and settling credit card transactions and verifying cashiers’ work for any outlets that take cash. As you can guess from the name, this work generally takes place at night once the hotel has completed the majority of its business. This person is also often in charge of the front desks turn the overnight hours While some aptitude with finances is desirable, this is often an hourly position that is less experienced than an accountant. The Night Auditor must be comfortable working overnight hours and also managing the customer service element, in addition to supporting the property’s financial management. A night auditor could become a shift supervisor and move their way up the management ladder.  [Explore job data for Night Auditors on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Director of Finance The Director of Finance manages all accounting functions and financial controls of a hotel. This person ensures that all financial reports, budgets, forecasts and other financial data are compiled accurately and that all legal and tax documentation is maintained and secured according to accepted accounting practices. This person also makes recommendations based on financial data and helps hotel management achieve its financial goals. The Director of Finance is a senior role, which requires an accounting/finance degree and at least 8 to 10 years of experience in hospitality. A Director of Finance pursues progressively more senior roles, such as VP of Finance or potentially moving into new hotel development and launching larger properties. [Explore job data for Directors of Finance on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Human Resource Manager At a certain point, a hotel’s headcount merits full-time Human Resources support. This role advises management and helps everyone adhere to the strict legal guidelines around hiring, firing, and monitoring performance. This person will also be responsible for much of the paperwork around staff and supporting the on-boarding process for each employee.  A human resource manager could be fresh out of college, or with multiple years of experience. The essential skill here is balancing empathy and humanity with laws and business. On one hand, a human resource manager must protect business;  on the other, there must be some level of humanity involved and what is often an emotional area of hotel operations.   The Human Resource Manager eventually moves onto a Director of Human Resources role, moving from an individual property to a regional manager.  [Explore job data for Human Resource Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Executive Chef The Executive Chef is responsible for all food that is served on site. This can include banquets, meetings, food and beverage outlets, room service and even external catering. Most often found in larger properties with bigger budgets (and greater operational need), the Executive Chef leads a team that may include multiple Sous Chefs, a Banquets/Events Chef, and a Pastry Chef, with each of those people responsible for different areas of food and beverage operations. As the head of the kitchen, the Executive Chef may also be asked to participate in pitches for large conferences and events, and have a much more public-facing role than other kitchen managers. The Executive Chef may move on from a single property to a hotel group as an Area Executive Chef, or even to a restaurant group or corporate entity.   [Explore job data for Executive Chefs on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Director of Housekeeping The Director of Housekeeping is responsible for all things housekeeping: the daily cleaning of rooms, maintaining service standards, managing housekeeper schedules and room assignments, collaborating with maintenance to perform regular, hiring and training, managing performance reviews, and any other duties related to the housekeeping department. As the leader of the department, this person also attends management meetings and serves as a liaison between direct reports and upper management.  A Director of Housekeeping has at least five years of experience working in hospitality, with major preference given to those with direct housekeeping experience. it's helpful to have that hands-on experience, not only to see things on the ground but also to build credibility with housekeepers.  As a career, a Director of Housekeeping works at progressively larger properties and transitions into managing housekeeping departments at a cluster of hotels, hotel group or another institution such as a college or hospital.  [Review job data for Directors of Housekeeping on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Housekeeping Manager The housekeeping manager assists the Director of Housekeeping and manages daily operations of the hotel cleaning staff. This usually includes scheduling staff, maintaining cleanliness standards, and supervising individual shifts. Smaller properties may only have a Housekeeping Manager; larger properties likely have multiple managers reporting into the Director of Housekeeping. A Housekeeping Manager usually has several years of experience as a housekeeper and may be promoted internally. A logical next step for this role is as Director of Housekeeping and then seeking more responsibilities by working at larger properties and portfolios. [Explore job data for Housekeeping Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Head of Maintenance/Chief Engineer The Head of Maintenance/Engineering maintains a property’s Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment (FF&E) to extend their useful life. This is an extremely important role, as it ensures that ownership extracts the most value out of its investments in the hotel asset. To accomplish this, a Head of Maintenance must be both organized (for routine maintenance) and extremely capable at troubleshooting -- especially when it comes to things that impact the guest experience, such as fixing a broken guestroom AC unit. A friendly demeanor is also a helpful asset, as this role often interfaces with frustrated guests who want a problem resolved quickly. Flashlight certifications are almost always required for this role; if not, there needs to be a minimum of five years of experience in engineering elsewhere. [Explore job data for Engineers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   IT Manager/Systems Manager The IT Manager is responsible for everything related to the alphabet soup of hotel technology: WiFi, in-room technology, PMS, CRS...If the technology optimizes hotel operations, the IT/Systems Manager is responsible for sourcing, implementing and maintaining it. As more properties transition to cloud-based technology, this role is increasingly seen only in larger properties, hotel groups, and corporate offices. Independents and smaller properties rely more on vendors and contractors to provide this type of support. For example, if the Wi-Fi goes down, a vendor or contractor would help the front desk/management resolve the issue. The skills required to be an effective IT Manager are, well, geeky. This person needs to have a thorough understanding of how technology Works come on as well as the way that technology can improve operations. The IT manager should be able to translate “geekspeak” into plain language so as not to alienate others and to build trust and credibility.  The career trajectory involves taking on progressively more responsibilities at larger organizations and eventually moving into a corporate role, culminating in a Chief Technology Officer. [See open roles for System Managers on Hcareers]   Loss Prevention Manager/Security Officer At a certain size, security becomes non-negotiable. This role may sometimes be called Head of Security or in other instances, it may be a Loss Prevention Manager or Security Officer. The job is simple: keep guests and staff safe while preventing theft and other incidents that cause a loss to the hotel. This role is often hourly but may also be salaried. As far as skills, strong judgment, effective risk assessment, and a detective’s mindset are all important for a loss prevention/security officer. Like other roles, the career path involves taking on more responsibilities at larger properties and eventually managing multiple departments across properties as a regional or corporate manager. [Explore job data for Loss Prevention on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   HOTEL REVENUE MANAGEMENT JOBS       Revenue Manager/Revenue Analyst The Revenue Manager’s job is to define and execute a hotel revenue strategy that optimizes a hotel's revenue across channels. The revenue manager uses technology and analytical skills to translate historical data into demand forecasts and then setting pricing accordingly (usually in real-time). A revenue manager's work is done in collaboration with other departments, especially sales and marketing. So collaboration is a must, as is creativity, strategic thinking, scenario planning and robust analysis. A revenue manager could be just out of college or with a few years of experience working in other revenue roles or in other parts of the hospitality industry.  With enough experience, a Revenue Manager could take on revenue responsibilities of multiple properties as a Cluster Manager or lead revenue as a Director of Revenue. Eventually, the career path could include VP of Revenue and Chief Revenue Officer. A revenue manager could also move over to marketing or a revenue analyst role in another industry. [Explore job data for Revenue Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Cluster Manager/Area Revenue Manager Cluster Revenue Manager is responsible for revenue management at a “cluster” of several hotels and is often based at corporate headquarters. An Area Revenue Manager handles a specific geographic area and could be located on-site or remote. Given the greater responsibility, these roles generally have three to five years of experience working in revenue management or a comparable role in another industry. As far as skills, they're similar to a revenue manager, with an additional layer of interpersonal skills and time management. When managing revenue for several properties, there's more to juggle -- especially when it comes to managing relationships with each individual property.  A cluster manager also needs to spot trends across multiple datasets for broader insights. A Cluster Manager might become a Director of Revenue, a hotel GM, VP of Revenue, and eventually a Chief Revenue Officer.  [Explore job data for Area Revenue Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Director of Revenue The Director of Revenue could be a solo practitioner (for instance, at a smaller boutique property) or she could be responsible for a team of Revenue Managers. It really comes down to the property's size, revenue profile and individual needs.  A Director of Revenue needs a minimum of 3 years experience, with the majority of it in some revenue-related role. However, it's more common to see around five years of experience or more at this level, depending on the market and hotel category. Alongside the typical revenue management skills of collaboration, creativity, strategy and data analysis, a Director of Revenue has to be able to translate analysis into digestible language that motivates others. Success in this role requires the ability to communicate and collaborate in a way that aligns everyone -- especially sales and marketing, who are key stakeholders in achieving revenue goals. Next steps on the career ladder are lateral moves to a larger/more prestigious/more challenging property, moving from an individual property to corporate, as well as becoming a hotel GM, VP of Revenue and eventually a Chief Revenue Officer. [Explore job data for Directors of Revenue on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   VP of Revenue This leadership position is found at larger hotel groups and major chains, where the VP of Revenue will be responsible for multiple teams across properties, brands, and/or geographies. These teams will most definitely include revenue, and may also include sales and marketing. Basically, anyone that has to do with bringing in revenue may report to the VP of Revenue. A VP of Revenue requires strong management and leadership skills, next-level strategy and ability to align/motivate teams in different geographies towards shared objectives. There's also I have to go staff managing competing priorities, acting as the conduit between management and frontline revenue management teams.  This is a senior role, so you’ll need around 5-7 years of experience at the very minimum. It greatly varies depending on a brand’s location, with smaller markets requiring less experience than larger ones. For the largest, most prestigious brands, you'll need at least 10 years of relevant experience to be considered for a role at this level. The next steps from here are the hotel C-suite (Chief Revenue Officer, Chief Commercial Officer), or another leadership role in another industry or hotel group. [Look for job data on VP of Revenue roles on Glassdoor and open jobs on Hcareers]   Chief Revenue Officer This C-suite position is found only in the largest of hospitality brands and requires decades of experience. This person is responsible for driving revenue across all areas of the brand’s business, working closely with the Chief Marketing Officer on demand  generation efforts at the brand level, as well as being directly responsible for revenue management and group sales on a regional level.  The CRO has world-class management skills, with a clearly demonstrated ability to work across a global organization. With so many distributed teams, it's a massive challenge to motivate everyone around a common vision with shifting priorities. So communication and empathy are vital. A CRO may move to become CEO onwards to another commercial C-suite role in another industry.   SALES AND MARKETING HOSPITALITY JOBS       Sales Manager/Group Sales Manager  The sales manager is responsible for prospecting corporate and leisure groups, as well as conferences and other events that draw larger groups to the hotel. The role also works to sell property amenities to locals and other groups that may be interested in the property.   As far as experience, a sales manager could be just out of college or have one to three years in a related role. That role should showcase skills such as strong networking and relationship building as well as the ability to read people and close deals.  a sales manager will also need to excel in proposal writing, using marketing technology to automate prospecting and business development, and the ability to set achievable targets and deliver without folding under pressure. The next steps on the career ladder for a sales manager would be as Regional/Cluster Sales Manager, Director of Sales, VP of Sales and Chief Revenue Officer. This role also provides plenty of experience for someone looking to eventually become a hotel GM. [Explore job data for Sales Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Marketing Manager A Marketing Manager is responsible for creating targeted advertisements across digital channels, such as email, social media, display advertising and traditional channels. This could be an entry-level role for a recent college graduate or someone with one to three years in a marketing role elsewhere. Since this role is all about marketing a hotel, a marketing manager needs to have a balance of creativity, such as copywriting and storytelling, and analysis. A marketing manager needs to understand how to segment audiences, create targeted campaigns, measure performance and adjust strategy as needed. Also required is a thorough understanding of various marketing channels, effective networking, effective collaboration skills and the ability to both create and execute strategy.  A marketing manager can be promoted to Area/Cluster Marketing Manager, Director of Marketing, VP of Marketing and eventually CMO or CRO. A marketing manager could also translate these skills into a management role of an individual property as GM. [Explore job data for Sales Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Events Manager/Meeting Planner The Events Manager (or Meeting Planner) works with sales managers to craft proposals that convert into business for the hotel. Once a contract is signed, this person manages all elements of an event relationship, from planning to execution to post-event reporting. With experience ranging from one to five years, this role is very customer-facing and requires great customer service skills in addition to planning and time management. Since this person manages scheduled events, there's usually a less traditional work schedule as well. You’ll need strong organizational skills with attention to detail, an authentic desire to deliver a memorable experience, interpersonal skills, conflict resolution and effective use of technology to plan and execute events,  The career path could include Marketing Manager, Sales Manager, Director of Events, and GM. [Explore job data for Sales Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT CAREERS       Hotel Manager (GM) The General Manager is responsible for every detail about a hotel's operations, all in service of managing costs and increasing revenues to maintain a profitable operation. All director-level roles report to this person, who is ultimately responsible for maintaining service/brand standards and delivering on performance expectations from ownership/corporate. To hold everyone accountable and maintain a culture of service, the GM sets the tone for everything. The GM also prepares yearly budgets to submit to hotel ownership or the corporate office. More often than not, the GM  has a college degree with a specialization in hospitality. A general manager that may not come from hospitality, this person usually has invested in a hospitality certification to develop a deeper understanding of the industry. A successful GM has strong leadership and communication skills, which she uses to clearly articulate a vision and motivate staff. Organized and effective, a GM  can balance many competing priorities each day Barstow to Lorain on the Brand's promise of hospitality. Also useful are a commitment to training, knowledge of safety, hygiene and employment law.  Having already reached a significant milestone in her career, a GM could look to manage multiple properties or perhaps go into the corporate organization as she moves up the corporate ladder. [Explore job data for General Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Operations Manager/Assistant GM Reporting directly to the general manager, the Operations Manager (or Assistant GM) monitors performance across departments and supports all Heads of Departments as needed. This includes running weekly meetings with all relevant teams to address any guest feedback, discuss sales targets and any other operational issues.  The Operations Manager must be exceptionally organized, able to juggle priorities and tasks that change frequently. This person must also have a firm grasp on all aspects of a hotel operation, which is why the ideal Operations Manager candidate has experience in multiple departments. An Operations Manager has multiple paths for promotion, from stepping into the GM job to overseeing several Operations Managers as a regional Director of Operations and then onwards to VP of Operations at the corporate level. [See job data for Operations Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   FOH Manager/Guest Services Manager The Front of House/Front Office Manager oversees all things guest relations. This role hires, trains, and manages the team of front desk agents that handles guest relations. As the most visible frontline staff at a hotel, this team exerts a major influence on the guest experience.  As such, the FOH Manager must have an eye for talent and a heart of hospitality, building a guest-centric culture that's reflected in guest reviews. The FOH Manager has often learned the ropes from the ground up from a front desk position, which builds credibility and shapes approach.  One of the most important skills here is the nuance needed to motivate a team of hourly workers with high turnover while still maintaining service standards. This requires a significant amount of conflict resolution, patience, resilience and a “get it done” mentality The FOH Manager may move into operations as an Operations Manager or become an Assistant General Manager with an eye on the General Manager job. [Explore job data for FOH Managers on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Reservation Manager Reservations Manager supervises other Reservations Agents and makes sure that the team stays on task and meets its objectives. Smaller properties may just have a single Reservation Manager and no Agents.  an ideal reservation manager has some experience, anywhere from one to five years. The most relevant experience involves customer service, not necessarily and hospitality. This person needs the ability to communicate warmly and graciously across the phone and an email, an eye for hiring and training, as well as a mentality that motivates a team of hourly Reservations Agents. [Explore job data for Reservations on Glassdoor and open roles on Hcareers]   Night Manager/Duty Manager The Night Manager, Duty Manager or Shift Supervisor handles all front desk operations during a specific period. This could involve handling reservations, fulfilling guest requests, and managing other front desk agents. A few years of experience in a related role is required, often as a front desk agent at another property. The Night/Duty Manager is a great candidate for moving up to assistant manager, front of house manager or another management role in operations. [Explore job data and open roles on Hcareers]   --   Adapting for Covid-19     The pandemic is a standard feature of our foreseeable future. As such, job descriptions and roles must be updated to reflect the shifting nature of hospitality work.  In most cases, the pandemic necessitates amplifying existing roles. Housekeepers are no longer only cleaners, they’re sanitation experts. GMs and other department heads are no longer just managers but also therapists, cheerleaders and process optimizers. Everyone is doing more with less and that must be accounted for in job descriptions and staff expectations. Here are a few ways that hospitality roles and responsibilities must adapt to doing business during a pandemic.  Sanitation Superstars: Cleaning is no longer limited to certain staff. It'll be everybody's job to clean their stations and participate in facilities upkeep. Since constant and consistent cleaning is at the center of any reopening strategy, the increased work must be spread broadly. Everyone must be empowered, encouraged and rewarded for contributing to a culture of guest and staff safety. Hybrid Roles: As with cleaning, staff will need to adjust to an all-hands-on-deck mentality. Lower occupancy means fewer employees. As we embark on the road to recovery, with demand fluctuating in fits and spurts, staff will take on expanded duties to cover for vacant roles. For example, you'll see more front desk staff double as valets and bellhops -- especially at larger hotels built for higher guest throughput.  Motivational Managers: As staff returns to work, managers must expand their skill sets to be even more attuned to their staff and guests. Many have suffered trauma and the lingering effects of uncertainty can cause ongoing stress. Managers must be careful to balance the property’s needs with those of staff. Everyone is living in stressful times and managers must account for that by being more empathetic, patient and understanding. Digital Concierge: As hotels reduce touchpoints to increase safety, hotel concierge services will increasingly be performed via digital communications, such as text messaging and live chat. Voice calls will also make a comeback in certain property types.  

What HR Software Does a Hotel Need to Succeed?

by
Hotel Tech Report
1 month ago

Relentless turnover challenges the sanity of even the most composed hotel manager. I would know: after owning two restaurants that employed 70 people at peak times, the constant battle against turnover triggers plenty of stressful memories. We tried offering health insurance and a living wage for BOH employees, but the economic realities of the low-margin restaurant business made this nearly impossible. Add in the appeal of jobs in less low wage industries, and hiring and retaining quality candidates with a passion for hospitality was always the top challenge. While hotels enjoy slightly better margins than standalone restaurants, the labor crunch extends equally. As hospitality businesses struggle to stay staffed up, a “mercenary frenzy” leads to lower-than-usual loyalty among workers who shop around for the best offer -- and jump ship at the slightest opportunity for a greater wage. Even with generous benefits, it can be incredibly difficult to retain staff. Rising rents and low wage growth, coupled with low unemployment in the U.S., have sharpened employee focus on gross wages above all else. To combat these employment trends, HR managers for hotels must rely on tools to increase their own productivity around sourcing new hires, as well as retaining dedicated team members with flexible scheduling and professional development opportunities. While there are certain features of the hospitality business that make hiring difficult, such as wage competitiveness, the right technology helps HR managers excel in an challenging labor environment.   The role of an HR manager When it comes to technology, It's important to match the functionality with the desired outcomes. Let's briefly review the roles and responsibilities of the hospitality HR manager: Sourcing. The HR manager sources potential candidates through online platforms, employee referrals, and personal networks. Interviewing and hiring. The HR manager screen candidates and oversees the process alongside hiring managers. Onboarding. Once hired, the new employee’s onboarding must be swift and thorough, balancing quality with speed. Retention. Existing employees are assets that must be treated as such. An HR managers helps retain staff, which is vital to the consistency of the guest experience and the profitability of the hotel. Each of these roles as a specific subset of technology that, when implemented correctly, makes the hospitality HR manager more productive and successful in the role.   Candidate sourcing Turnover for most hotels reaches far into the double digits. This figure is even larger for those hospitality brands that also hire for extensive food and beverage operations. The churn puts hospitality HR managers on constant offense when it comes to sourcing quality candidates. HR managers should use a three-part strategy, sourcing potential candidates through staffing and recruiting networks, employee referrals, and personal networks. A blended approach brings a greater mix of candidates, and contributes to a healthy talent pipeline. An emerging category of online platform especially compelling for today’s hospitality HR managers is on-demand staffing. With an on-demand workforce, HR manages can fill unexpected labor gaps, both short and long-term. While the hiring process may be less rigorous and more suited for filling roles with specific responsibilities, these platforms are a useful addition to any hospitality HR managers toolkit.   Speed to hire Staff departures are common -- but can still catch management off guard. The HR manager must be equipped to quickly hire candidates by moving them through the hiring funnel in the shortest amount of time. The “speed to hire” metric, which Hired defines as “the total time the candidate spends in the funnel,” is an immensely useful metric for hospitality hiring. “We define speed to hire as the total time the candidate spends in the hiring funnel from initial sourcing to offer acceptance.” -Hired.com By tracking how long it takes to hire, HR managers improve business outcomes by helping department heads replace outgoing stuff and fill new roles quickly. Another benefit: quality candidates have less time to be snagged by others. In the competition for talent, a mere hours can make a huge difference in closing a new hire.    The Applicant Tracking Software is the hospitality HR manager’s greatest ally. It encompasses all aspects of the hiring funnel, from sourcing candidates down to the eventual hire. Effective management of this process leads to greater hiring success. Once the candidate is in the funnel, avoid scheduling hassles and use on-demand video interviews which are more candidate friendly. Potential employees can submit these videos on their own time, which also frees up HR managers with far fewer initial candidate screens. When evaluating Applicant Tracking Software, look for these types of automations that boost productivity and enhance the hiring experience. The best candidates see disorganized hiring processes as warning signs.   Onboarding Once the candidate has accepted, now it's all about how quickly she can be trained. Just like with speed-to-hire, an efficient training process prepares the employee to be an individual contributor. The faster this happens, the lower the turnover costs associated with filling an open role. The trick is to balance speed with quality -- what’s the minimum amount of time that this person, at this experience level, needs to become an integrated team member? In collaboration with the hiring manager, the HR manager should shape the training process to be as mutually beneficial to both the organization and the candidate. Most candidates want to be trained, but many will be turned off by overtraining or a disorganized onboarding process. Applicant Tracking Systems with on-boarding functionality make it easy for HR managers to check-in with new employees periodically in the first few weeks on the job.   Retain and reward Regardless of the business, turnover costs money. With each lost employee, the business faces additional costs related to finding replacement workers, training them, and often paying overtime to workers covering the schedule gaps in the meantime. [Turnover] has high management costs associated with it as you’ll need more exempt managers to ensure training, quality and to pick up the pieces when the quality is just not there. -Restaurateur Azhar Hashem on Why SF Restaurants are Suffocating. Mitigating these costs must be top-of-mind for an HR professional. Since it's far more affordable (and beneficial to both the guest experience and staff satisfaction), focus on retention through a positive employee experience and strong professional development support. The current state of the employee experience can be captured with employee engagement software that gather real-time feedback so HR managers can take the pulse of the organization often. These platforms also improve on-property staff communications, reducing mistakes, increasing productivity, and generally making everyone’s day that much better. Workers and hospitality often prioritize flexibility when it comes to scheduling. For those workers, it's important to offer mobile-optimized scheduling tools that facilitate shift trading and communications among colleagues. Some employees won't have access to computers at home, so these mobile-optimized solutions encourage engagement without alienating a core subset of staff. Many of these tools also integrate labor management, which provides a better on-property life for staff with digital logbooks, as well as performance benchmarks to reward high-performing teams. Payroll solutions should also be reliable and accurate, as a consistently paid staff is the bedrock of any hotel. Hotels must also reward the most promising employees with additional responsibilities and perks wherever possible. Beyond the obvious, such as promoting from within and seeking growth opportunities for the most promising staff, HR managers can more productively support staff with professional development features embedded in staff engagement software. By codifying the professional development process, HR managers boost retention by lighting the path for ambitious staff.   All in all, be communicative, adaptable, and action-oriented. The best hospitality HR managers stretch across the entire organization, collaborating and hustling to keep staff quality and retention high. And never underestimate the power of a simple “thank you.”