Let us find your solution

News & Analysis

Insights and advice from the HTR team to find the best technology to grow your hotel business

Hotel Property Management Systems Software Articles

Which Hotelogix Marketplace partners work best for your hotel?

by
Hotel Tech Report

Hotelogix is the latest in a line of hospitality technology vendors that have recently launched a marketplace. The thinking behind these initiatives is that existing customers should have a clear place to find integrations that work well together. By providing a source of vetted partners, hospitality technology vendors hope to improve implementations and encourage better long-term outcomes. The new marketplace features third-party solutions that integrate fully with the Hotelogix hotel management system. To navigate the latest marketplace, we’ve identified a few useful integrations for hotels of different sizes.   Top Marketplace Apps for Smaller Hotels Smaller properties prioritize reasonably-priced solutions that help staff provide better service more consistently, as well as provide functionality that makes independents more competitive with chains. These properties usually have less complicated operations without on-site F&B or spas. For properties that do have those on-site amenities, many available solutions have unneeded functionality -- which can make those solutions cost-prohibitive. Training and on-boarding also take center stage, as the smaller staff can’t afford to take too much time learning a new thing. Benefits must be observed quickly and without a long ramp-up period. Here are a few solutions that integrate with Hotelogix to help smaller properties compete more effectively. #1 Tripadvisor Review Express Tripadvisor Review Express allows hotels to automate the review process -- saving time for hotels with limited staff. Rather than spending time manually asking guests for reviews, this automation means less time spent requesting reviews and increases the frequency, recency, and velocity of reviews by encouraging every guest to leave a review. When used regularly, TripAdvisor claims that “the average Popularity Ranking for highly engaged hotels was 63% higher than their non-engaged counterparts.” As this guide to Review Express emphasizes, regular reviews keep engagement high and automated templates reduce manual work. Benefits of the integration: Review Express collects all TripAdvisor Reviews of the hotel added by recent visitors and Hotelogix makes sure that these are directly displayed on the Hotelogix front desk so staff can respond rapidly.     #2 Bookingsuite RateIntelligence Bookingsuite RateIntelligence is the Booking.com family’s rate manager, ideally suited for smaller properties that may not need a full-featured rate/revenue management solution. It's a cloud-based rate shopping tool that gives smaller properties an edge with access to the kind of rate intelligence used by larger brands. Smarter pricing decisions can be made based on market demand data and competitor intelligence, the Rate Manager. Benefits of the integration: Single login to access, instant access within Hotelogix to top five competitors’ rates on RateIntelligence, compare prices with competitors’ and update rates in your PMS, and single click to update rates on all your channels.     #3 Intuit Quickbooks Intuit Quickbooks has evolved into a comprehensive accounting solution, which is well-positioned in price and functionality for smaller properties. Quickbooks reduces headaches around manual management of invoices, and payables. It’s simple and efficient, with a handy “at a glance” dashboard to track performance. There’s a companion expense app so you can take pictures of receipts, and pull them into Quickbooks. Also, integrates cleanly with TurboTax if you decide to tackle your taxes solo. Benefits of the integration: Individual tracking and handling of credits and commissions given to TAs & corporate clients, as well as advanced payments & payments against settlements can be managed through separate account head.   #4 Mailchimp Email Marketing MailChimp’s email marketing software is simple to use and easy to access across devices. With its template and visual editor, the company has eliminated design barriers to creating classy email campaigns, as well as pre-arrival and post-stay communications. For small properties without a marketing function, the do-it-all GM can design templates, run campaigns and use analytics to get better with time. It’s generally recommended that hotel marketers work with email marketing and CRM platforms such as Revinate and Guestfolio but very small properties may not have enough guest data or return visitors to warrant specialized products.  Make sure to benchmark a generalist solution like Mailchimp with specialized solutions before adopting because bad email marketing can actually cost your hotel money through unsubscribes and sendability issues. Benefits of the integration: MailChimp lists update automatically with new bookings, cancellations, check-ins, and check-outs. Data imported into the relevant list includes room type, number of rooms, rate/package type, reservation booking deposit, tax amount, country, date of birth and gender of the guest. This information can then be used to segment lists and write copy for each specific segment.   #5 STAAH Channel Manager The STAAH Channel Manager handles online distribution so you can manage them easily from one place. When a customer books a room from one website, availability is automatically updated across all other channels including your property’s booking engine. STAAH also has an integrated suite of software, including a reputation manager, booking engine, website, and gift voucher manager, which can be a convenient one-stop-shop for marketing a small property. Benefits of the integration: Single log-in to make instant updates and manage multiple OTAs, as well as analytics to determine rates, stop-sell limits and evaluate the success of sales channels. Direct connection to PMS minimizes manual errors that lead to overbooking and double-booking.   Top Marketplace Apps for Mid-Sized Hotels Medium-sized properties may sometimes feel stuck in the middle: too large for solutions geared towards independents and yet too small for enterprise-level systems built to manage major operations. Many medium-size properties have F&B operations, sizable staff, and established revenue management procedures -- all of which require solutions with adequate functionality. Except without the enterprise-grade price tag!  Medium sized properties generally have larger teams, a marketing department and dedicated resources for functions like revenue management. Here are a few solutions that help medium-sized properties increase productivity and grow their business through better revenue management.         #6 SiteMinder Channel Manager SiteMinder’s channel manager provides the benefits of channel management to hotels with more complex online distribution needs. With granular controls over inventory allocations to individual channels, SiteMinder supports a sophisticated revenue management strategy. For medium-sized hotels that welcome guests from all over, the hotel’s base currency automatically gets converted to the currency of a particular transaction -- helpful for providing a consistent experience for guests. Benefits of the integration: The direct integration into Hotelogix eliminates any chance of overbooking or double booking, and also prevents errors arising from manual consolidation of booking data.   #7 Beonprice Revenue Management The Beonprice revenue manager maximizes profitability by optimizing rates for every room sold through an intuitive and easy-to-use interface. The tool starts with a hotel’s historical booking data and then recommends pricing based on using local and national events, e-reputation, transportation price, weather forecasts and exchange rates. By automating rate setting using artificial intelligence and all the available data, medium-sized hotels can devote more time to optimizing other areas of the business. Benefits of the integration: Rates are published in real-time, using the latest data from the property management system. With this real-time, scalable, automated and flexible execution of rate publishing, hotels can more fully manage revenues and unlock the value of existing data within a PMS.   #8 Repup Review Management Repup reputation management helps hoteliers make sense of online reviews by aggregating all reviews into a single dashboard. Using a combination of natural language processing, data mining, and business logic, the tool evaluates performance so hotels can win more business, increase revenues and build customer loyalty. For mid-sized hotels with lots of moving parts, management won’t have a direct line of sight into everything; Repup can surface issues and identify problems before they magnify. Benefits of the integration: Hoteliers can access complete review data within Hotelogix front desk. The centralized dashboard showcases 60 days of reviews and social media mentions from over 15 online channels, such as Expedia, Booking.com, and Facebook. There’s also an option to configure Guest Feedback Form which can be shared with guests right from the dashboard.     #9 Xero Accounting Xero’s accounting software has become a popular choice for hotels with more complex accounting needs, such as multi-currency accounting, payroll, inventory management, and customized recurring online invoices for regular suppliers. For managers on-the-go, there’s a mobile app that mirrors many of the core management features of the web version. The platform is flexible: a robust set of integrations that medium-sized hotels plenty of control to customize workflows and sync Xero with POS, hotel CRM and other tools. Benefits of the integration: Room revenue, as well as corresponding taxes, commissions, and other charges are first recorded in Hotelogix and then automatically synced with Xero -- no more manual imports from the PMS to accounting software! Also, only fully settled folios get synced with Xero, which avoids a lot of headache around cancellations and unsettled folios.   Top Marketplace Apps for Hotel Groups & Large Hotels Larger properties and hotel groups employ more people and serve more guests across more complex operations. They need enterprise-level systems that can adequately manage all of these moving parts. The sheer number of options leads to a complex evaluation process. Any new tech tool must integrate seamlessly and work well with everything else in a hotel’s tech stack. There are many interdependencies that make a challenging road for implementation. Not to mention the fact that a larger operation has more stakeholders, such as security and IT, that must approve any new vendor. Depending on the group, and the tech being implemented, on-boarding new tools can take months -- or more than a year for more mission-critical systems that require careful testing. So ease of integration is paramount for larger properties and hotel groups. Here are a few solutions that help larger properties and hotel groups manage complexity at scale and leverage all available data to build a healthy business over the long-term.     #10 OneLoyalty OneLoyalty is a Loyalty Management Software that allows hotels without access to a larger loyalty offering to provide best-in-class loyalty programs to their guests. The independent hotel loyalty program also extends to employees and vendors, as OneLoyalty offers tools to engage across stakeholders to foster more loyalty. With OneLoyalty, hotels can offer rewards, coupons or other perks to their guests. A companion mobile app can ping guests with unique offers and alert guests to upcoming promotions. Benefits of the integration: With direct integration, hotels can more easily use the sales tool to attract more customers and increase the share of wallet. Customer profiles benefit from the direct integration, which makes for simpler segregation of customers to personalize offers and thus deepen re;relationships with past guests.     #11 Snapshot Business Intelligence Snapshot business intelligence tool positions itself as “hospitality’s data platform.” The comprehensive data analysis platform is the backbone of a hotel group’s data practice. Since Snapshot thrives with larger pools of data, the solution is ideally suited for larger properties and multi-property groups. The Snapshot sweet spot is facilitating access across disparate systems and data sources. Hotels benefit from enterprise-grade custom visualizations that surface insights derived from this comprehensive view into a hotel’s business. Benefits of the integration: Hotelogix sends all past and future bookings and transactions to SnapShot for accurate hotel data analytics. Your dashboard is updated after every night audit, as Hotelogix sends an incremental report to SnapShot automatically. In addition, Hotelogix helps track reviews and social follower trends from SnapShot thanks to connectivity to social media and TripAdvisor.   #12 Comtrol In-Room Devices Comtrol in-room devices have been providing networking and data communications for over 30 years. The stability of the company makes it a preferable partner for many larger operations that prize longevity -- after all, it’s important to know that a mission-critical vendor for communications, IT, and networking will be in business when you need them most. Comtrol gear ensures that the PMS maintains consistent contact and data transmission to accurately manage guest accounts. Benefits of the integration: With a direct connection into the PMS, Comtrol can ensure adequate functionality across in-room devices. For such an important part of the guest experience, such as room locks and keycards, this functionality must work without fail. In addition, there are potential benefits for enhanced customizations, such as personalizing the in-room entertainment with guest greetings and other guest-specific information.     #13 Vertical Booking CRS The Vertical Booking CRS integrates with over 200 channels, which gives larger hotels more granular control over inventory distribution and allocation. The company also provides on-going training, which is especially beneficial to large operations that will naturally experience higher turnover.  The CRS can be set-up to suit hotel groups and chains by defining which functions are managed centrally and which are managed independently for each property. In addition, chains can view performance at the chain level and property level, with staff assigned roles that offer access to the system according to individual roles. The graphic below maps the workflow for chains and groups. Benefits of the integration: A tight integration between the property management system and the central reservation system reduces errors and keeps the team focused on maximizing guest satisfaction. All reservations, whether made through the hotel's website or other channels, are instantly updated in the PMS. An added benefit for larger chains is that Vertical Booking’s CRS can integrate with multiple PMS, so if a new property has Hotelogix, it can be quickly integrated into the workflow.  

This is why hotel brands shouldn't build tech in house

by
Hotel Tech Report

When enterprise companies spend loads of money on technology they usually think about building tech in house so they can have more control over development and ultimately save money.  Sometimes this equation favors building tech in house and other times it does not. Several high profile failures in the hotel industry include a collaboration amongst all major hotel groups to create an online booking platform called Room Key which was eventually shuttered.  We’ll discuss this initiatives and more in detail below. Most sophisticated enterprise companies (think Nike and McDonalds) understand that they are not tech companies so they effectively outsource their tech R&D spend to 3rd parties that are focused on innovation.  Could McDonalds build software to help franchisees manage their listings? Yes, but they partner with Yext.  Nike could definitely build prototyping software in house for its digital products, but it chooses to partner with InVision.  Firms like Nike and McDonalds have become innovators by being experts at identifying trends and partnering with top tech companies to meet their core business goals. So the question is, if McDonalds and Nike outsource their respective technology needs - should hospitality companies really be building tech in house? We believe that when hotel brands try to build tech in house it ultimately brings them into precarious waters, here's why: 1. They lack the resources to compete with pure play technology companies 2. Hotel brands usually underestimate the ongoing effort required to maintain and scale a technology business (let alone multiple business lines and products)   Hospitality companies don't have the resources to compete with tech companies. Charles Schwab is a massive financial institution worth more than $60B.  The firm could easily build custom marketing automation solutions for the business but they choose to work with with Marketo because they know that Marketo will be able to innovate over the long run.  Even Citrix and Microsoft, technology companies themselves, use Marketo’s marketing technology so that they can focus on their core businesses. IDeaS, a popular revenue management software company and it’s parent company SAS just announced a 3-year plan to invest $1B in artificial intelligence.  SAS is a company that deeply understands the power of focus and investing in its core competencies. "If I want to host a SaaS application, I choose a cloud host. If I want to manufacture a consumer product, I partner with a company like Foxconn. If I need delivery for my restaurant I work with a delivery company. Yet, brands without a technology focus still believe it will be cheaper and more effective to build their own software internally when history has shown us, time after time, that these projects will be over budget, unsustainable, and competitively weaker than the professional tech products in the market." ~Adam Harris, CEO, Cloudbeds The median publicly traded software company spends 23% of revenue on R&D with many high growth firms spending 50% of revenue.  It’s hard to imagine that even Marriott could afford the spend levels to develop one competitive product let alone multiple product lines that compete with a myriad of different specialist software businesses.   Technology is not a static good. Sophisticated enterprise companies buy into the future of a tech product as much as the present. Technology requires immense amounts of capital to scale and increasing investments to remain competitive.  Technology requires even more upkeep than hotels. Where hotels build up their capital reserves and renovate roughly every 5-7 years, tech companies are constantly “renovating” their products daily through product sprints.  When enterprise companies “buy” tech they are partnering with tech companies for the future as much as selecting products for the present. The reason that the SaaS business model (recurring subscriptions) aligns value so well between buyers and sellers is because the product is constantly being reinvented so it forces tech companies to maintain their end of the bargain.  When you sign up for SaaS (software as a service) you are not only signing up for the product today but you’re buying into its roadmap for the future. Hotel companies that try to build tech in house are rarely prepared for the constant investment required to maintain let alone scale products and keep up with the ongoing massive investment, iteration and innovation of tech firms. So what does history tell us about hotel companies who have miscalibrated this decision? Starwood was bought by Marriott for $13B and itself has taken huge losses on technology investments when they were no longer able to invest enough to remain competitive. According to Starwood’s (now Marriott) 2015 10K filing, the firm took a $6M charge for “technology related costs and expenses that were no longer deemed recoverable.”  Go back further to Starwood’s 2013 annual filing for stockholders and you’ll find a $19M charge related to “technology related expenses” that the firm “decided to absorb” because they couldn’t collect from managed and franchise properties.     When we draw the analogy between maintaining software and maintaining a hotel, Starwood was effectively unable to properly renovate its technology and investors paid for it.  Every hotelier knows what happens when you let a property go too long without renovation and the same happens when software isn’t maintained properly. Similar to Starwood building tech in house and having trouble maintaining the infrastructure, Choice created Skytouch PMS internally with the vision of transforming the tech market and has similarly struggled. “In 2014, it [Skytouch] generated a net loss to the company of up to $20 million. Investors have pressured Choice to either make SkyTouch profitable, sell it, or close it down.” Choice stopped reporting the results of its Skytouch division and now includes those results within its “Corporate & Other” expense line (pg. 102 of Choice 2018 10K filing). So while Choice no longer gives updates on how Skytouch is doing - it is highly inprobable that a company like Choice would decide to include the a business unit as an expense line if that unit was doing well.  In addition to the Skytouch debacle, we've also heard that Choice is winding down its Choice Labs innovation division.  Accor, too, recently reported a $288M write-off on tech investments such as AirBnB competitor Onefinestay and concierge service John Paul. Accor even tried to sell it’s distribution to independents and shuttered the project after 2 years, here’s what happened in the words of Accor’s own spokesperson. “This initiative is no longer relevant in regards to the Group’s strategy and its new profile as per today.  Results are below expectations” Accor wanted to plug independents into its massive distribution which in theory could add a ton of value if executed well and even that didn’t work. Even when all the big hotel groups banded together to build the online booking platform Room Key they failed (Choice, Hilton, Hyatt, InterContinental, Marriott, Wyndham) - isn’t it time that hotel companies learned this lesson? Even Booking.com had to shut down it’s hotel software operations after some high profile acquisitions - a testament to how tough the business really is.   Conclusion: Hotel brands shouldn’t build tech - they should get better at buying it The lesson here is clear - hotel brands need to focus on what they do best.  They should leverage their scale and clout to secure great service and attention from tech partners. It’s up to franchisees and investors to ensure that operators stay focused. Hotel brands have insanely complex businesses managing many stakeholders who often have conflicting interests.  The business of running a hotel is a huge feat both operationally and from a revenue/distribution perspective. "Because the skepticism exists and because tech can take long, hoteliers reach the wrong conclusion. They decide to build instead of buy. I have witnessed a transformation in travel tech. Increasingly, hotels are embracing the rules of comparative advantage and are embracing tech where they can move fast, learn fast and benefit quickly." ~Alexandra Zubko (former IHG Lead Strategist) Because of these factors, hotel companies who want to succeed in the digital age should be experts at technology procurement and management.  Historically hotel brands have been very weak when it comes to technology procurement and management so many have tried to compensate for that weakness by building tech products in house. Unfortunately this strategy often leads to write-offs, burning piles of cash and consequently the executives who lead these disastrous projects being pushed out. "Great technology products enable a valuable job to be done to be easily performed with maximum success and consistent results. With the blistering pace at which the world is changing, our expectations change. That means jobs to be done change. And that means software needs to rapidly iterate and evolve. That is why the world is headed to simple, modular solutions that can nail jobs to be done as they evolve. The smartest brands know that to create compelling and lasting technology advantage, it’s now about identifying and bringing best-in-class interoperable solutions together into powerful system that gives lasting advantage.  From a cost, resource, time to market and life time value perspective, you’ll waste literally millions of dollars even before calculating the opportunity cost. Brands need to get amazing at hand-picking and investing in their strategic technology partners who are proven to design, build and iterate the purpose-built software hotels require, so they can then focus on delighting guests, growing locations and enhancing the value of their networks for franchisees." ~Marc Heyneker, CEO @ Revinate   Large enterprise brands have some clear motivations: (1) They want to expand to more and more hotels worldwide, and be able to do so quickly and efficiently. That means needing a consistent stack of solid technology that can be deployed, enabled and operationalized to run and add those hotels to the overall system. (2) They want to proudly position their Technology Stacks and enabled programs as unique value-adds that differentiate their Brand and their Brand value. So they can both convince Owners why they’re better, and monetize and justify their Brand fees in an age where consumer preference for brands is in decline. This sometimes gives large enterprises the false sense of belief that they need to build their own. In fact, building your own puts both goals in jeopardy, almost immediately. These multi-million dollar, multi-year, multi-faceted technology projects become sinkholes for capital investment, anchors to business progress and optimization, and turn into tough write-downs as we saw in the examples above. Hotel brands should instead be focused on rethinking their technology organizations to be better buyers and managers.  Corporate hotel purchasing units have historically focused on price negotiations and software customization (i.e. product roadmap hijacking) but in order for brands to thrive in today’s hyper competitive markets they are in need of a massive strategy shift. Red Lion Hotels Corporation is one such company that has taken a deep look at how it buys technology and optimizes its tech stack. Red Lion Hotels Corporation CIO John Edwards shared his firm's approach to technology vendor selection with Hotel Tech Report. "At RLHC, we have been able to establish ourselves as leaders in hospitality innovation by focusing on what we do best: finding the right technology partners to create solutions that meet our hotel’s needs. We believe that is the fastest way to change the technical landscape in our industry.  RLabs and Canvas Integrated Systems were created to house our already existing technology and innovation solutions, which provide customized best-in-class solutions for our hotels. Our tech stack includes well known industry solutions such as IDeaS, Opera, & WindSurfer as well as new industry solutions such as Monscierge and HAPI." Digitally savvy hotel owners want technological choice and they want the procurement benefits that brands command with scale.  The brand development teams that win in the digital age will be the ones who are able to deliver choice to owners around which technology vendors to use, the scale that comes with warehousing and leveraging data from that warehouse and the cost benefits that come from bundled negotiations with vendors.   Recommendations to hotel brands who want tech to be a core differentiator 1. Map out clear technology systems required to deliver on core business goals and all potential providers 2. Lay foundational infrastructure for open systems and clean data Design scalable processes to constantly beta test competitive products in the market and identify new products that can drive core business goals. 3. Set aside designated resources for technology management. Hotel groups should maintain a vendor CRM and dedicated staff for managing vendor relationships. This staff should also be tasked with collecting market insights and sharing new technological developments as well as vendor status updates on a regular basis with leadership. 4. Set clear and tangible KPIs with each vendor that must be met in order to retain the contract (e.g. customer support response time) Create clear roadmaps for switching systems in the event that suppliers do not deliver on KPIs 5. Invest in tech startups that fit your strategic criteria above! Highgate (invested in Stay Wanderful, Travel Tripper, LodgIQ, OTA Insight) and CitizenM (invested in Snapshot, exited to Shiji) have been incredibly successful executing on this strategy. They put strategic money to work then derisk their investments by giving those startups proof of concept in their properties. 6. For hotel companies that don't have the resources to start a fund internally like them there are great strategic venture capital firms that are focused on real estate and can do the heavy lifting for you - check out Metaprop VC and Fifth Wall Ventures. Investing enables you to gain access to innovation and lend your expertise without snuffing out the creativity. Leadership is about investing in great people and trusting them to do the work, not about micromanaging every aspect of the process yourself.

"Super Angel" Dave Berkus on the convergence of PMS, CRS and hotel CRM

by
Hotel Tech Report

Dave Berkus knows hospitality technology more than nearly anyone. Back in the early 1980s, his company, Computerized Lodging Systems, dominated the nascent hospitality technology market with one of the first electronic Property Management Systems on the market. The immediate popularity of the technology resulted in rapid growth for the company, which was recognized on the Inc 500 list -- twice. Dave also created FOSSE, the property management system technology that Marriott used for almost 36 years. Today, there are over 700 property management systems for hotels. With such a dense thicket of choices, it's hard to imagine the early days of hospitality technology. These are the days when only a few players dominated, offering truly game-changing solutions that defined how hotels began using technology to operate more efficiently and profitably. Dave is also an accomplished angel investor, having achieved an impressive 97% internal rate of return from over 150 investments to date. His Wayfare Ventures unites five partners from AIG, TAJ Hotel Group and Starwood, alongside a board of accomplished travel industry veterans, to make early stage investments in travel technology startups. Hotel Tech Report’s Jordan Hollander recently enjoyed a wide-ranging conversation with Dave on the Hotel Tech Insider podcast, where the two discussed how Dave’s history in hospitality technology has shaped the way he sees the industry today. These are the most pertinent themes that reveal how this hospitality technology luminary sees the future of hotel tech, as well as what he looks for when evaluating both ideas and entrepreneurs for investment.   The future of the PMS With so many property management solutions competing for business, it's hard to envision a post-PMS future. Yet, this future is coming, Berkus says, due to the increased importance of the Central Reservation System. The CRS owns the guest name record, which has made it more of a centralized source of data than the PMS: The PMS systems are, for the chains at least, becoming increasingly less important, as they handle right now in-house functions only. Berkus notes that the cloud PMS companies of today are likely to be the players who evolve these CRS like capabilities so while he believes that their technology will remain a core piece of the tech stack, he believes that what it means to be a PMS will change more in the next 5-10 years than in the last 20 years combined. Guest history has shifted to the CRS, while the PMS has transitioned into a fully operational role for specific properties. As hotels have both consolidated and established micro-brands, the CRS naturally became the way to share guest preferences across the portfolio. The centralization of data cemented the role of the CRS at the center of modern data-driven personalization and marketing strategies. says Berkus:   Big Data's being used in very important ways but certainly not just from the PMS system anymore. The question then is: if the CRS could potentially supplant the PMS as the source of all-important guest data, will we need a PMS system in the future? Berkus says yes but the legacy PMS companies will be forced to innovate and more specifically open up their architecture to become platforms themselves because CRS, CRM and even Revenue Management companies of today have the requisite data necessary to become the center of the tech stack according to Berkus. Eventually, Berkus sees most hotels relying on a single cloud-based system that aggregates all functionality into one flow, which reduces errors and increases accuracy as it doesn't require passing information around multiple systems. A hybrid PMS/CRS/CRM solution means a single guest record that enables better, more accurate personalization. The consolidation of functionality also simplifies the tech stack and should help hotels effectively use existing data to power personalization at the individual guest level. A unified tech stack unleashes the full power of data-driven decision making, which will soon be table stakes for how hotels everywhere compete. Rather than relying on incomplete sets of data, hoteliers can constantly make decisions based on the holistic view. A unified tech stack can also be achieved through seamless integrations and Berkus says that “there will always be best of breed solutions in various categories.” This vision will take a while to achieve, and so the PMS will continue to play a critical role for hotel operations: If we look ahead ten years, it would be easy to see a single cloud-based system integrating everything from CRM to reservations to the accounting functions at the properties, all the way through all forms of marketing and follow-through. Even with this view, Berkus sees the potential for category leaders to dominate specific verticals, while still providing the essential services necessary to run a hotel. For example, revenue management, which may be a feature of a CRS or a standalone solution -- all depending on how an individual property derives its revenue, and the sophistication of its revenue generation strategies. Part of the problem, he says, is that people confuse hotel tech with quality hotel tech: just because a hotel has a system doesn't mean that it is a good system. For Berkus, this means that the hospitality technology industry has plenty of dynamism ahead of it and he believes that it’s far from maturity.   The transformative power of analytics For Berkus, the primary reason for the PMS’ uncertain future is due to its isolation from data and analytics. Even the most integrated systems have challenges when it comes to gathering data from disparate sources into a unified view. Even so, it’s the analytics on top of all of this data that drives profitable hospitality today. Whichever technology hotel uses, It must facilitate the types of analysis that drive “more capable decisions,” across the organization, says Berkus: Analytics are everything. The most important single change that's going to come is the fact that every piece of data that arrives at the central source will be analyzed. You're going to find that more capable decisions will be made to maximize revenue...based upon AI and data analytics. That's your future. The unsaid implications here is that hotels with a sub-par data and analytics approach will be left behind. Hospitality has become not just about the guest-facing product but also the hidden back-end of intelligent data capture and analysis. The top performers will effectively oscillate between analyzing the data and making clear improvements based on this analysis.   The data-driven hotel GM As data and analytics move to the core of a hotel’s operation, general managers must evolve their skill sets to match. While operations will never cease to be a part of a hotel general managers role, success in this role is increasingly about the ability to enhance profitability by effectively translating data analytics into actionable initiatives. Currently, GMs have a steep learning curve to build muscle memory around analyzing large amounts of data from disparate sources. As machines become more capable of doing the analysis on their own, the best GMs will be able to take action on the analysis presented by the tools to increase profitability, Berkus predicts: A manager has to be able to add value by adding revenue and by increasing guest satisfaction. Those two things are not necessarily the operational things that a manager today normally concentrates on. Marketing also matters more to the GM of the future. As marketing campaigns become data-focused, GMs will engage more deeply with their marketing teams to leverage a data-driven approach to spend marketing dollars more efficiently. It's all about the relevant message consumed in the right context, as GMs seek to add value in new ways.   Sourcing true pain points from sales and marketing Berkus is an active angel investor, and his recent announcement of Wayfare Ventures brings his focus to travel technology. When it comes to developing an idea, Berkus sees real value in entrepreneurs solving true pain points rather than perceived problems: I love it when somebody in marketing or sales develops a company and says “I feel the pain” and let's try and solve the need. As opposed to what I see most often, which is an engineer says I really got an idea and I'm going to make that idea work. The contrarian view is noteworthy in its opposition to the engineer-focused view espoused by many investors and technologists. Part of this view comes from the plummeting costs of cloud computing, as well as the prevalence of APIs which make it simpler to plug into an existing ecosystem without having to build as much technical infrastructure. Differentiation comes less from tech and more from truly knowing the problem and having clarity around what needs to be solved -- rather than building a technically-flawless solution that misses the mark and fails to gain traction because it doesn't solve an actual problem. An early-stage solution that solves a real problem for a specific segment sells itself and helps a startup gain traction at a lower cost. It’s expensive to convince people that a product solves a non-existent problem.   Market trends poised for investment As far as trends in the market that have potential, Berkus points to artificial intelligence, robotics, and data analytics as three disruptive forces. However, things change fast. Apps are no longer the hot commodity they once were. Today’s opportunities are all about AI, robots, and data analytics. When evaluating the most exciting opportunities for investment, Berkus expands his view to encompass all of travel technology. This expanded view allows him to see opportunities from the interconnectedness of the travel and hospitality industries, which is a core part of the thesis at Wayfare Ventures. It all comes down to using modern technology to find new revenue that may not have been easy to uncover in the past. Whatever it be, there are opportunities now for revenue that weren't easily available in the past but are today. But the whole point is if guest satisfaction goes up and guests are able to do things they couldn't do before, like order a meal from text, then you're going to have better revenue and more satisfaction.   Enjoy the full podcast episode here. Outside of the points covered above, Berkus shares the fascinating foundational story of the first property and yield management tools for hotels.

Hotelogix founder to hotel industry “Artificial intelligence is not going to take your job”

by
Hotel Tech Report

One of the biggest misconceptions that hotel workers believe is that technology and artificial intelligence will take their job.  Here’s a news flash - it won’t. Don’t believe us? Just take a look at history. From early Mesopotamia to 17th century Europe economic growth grew at a steady pace.  Blacksmiths forged iron, tailors made clothes and so on. At the dawn of the industrial revolution many predicted that factories would displace this workforce and create mass unemployment.  In fact, the opposite happened and factories created an entirely new economy with explosive employment and economic growth. What we see time and time again is that game changing innovation creates growth that in turn delivers net positive jobs.  Hoteliers who want to succeed in the future are advised not to focus on the jobs that technology will displace but on the jobs that it will create. The same misconception from the Industrial Revolution resurfaced in the late 70s with the advent of spreadsheets.  Analysts thought that they would lose their jobs to intelligent computing programs but found that technology actually empowered them.  The top analysts of the 70s were those who were best at doing advanced calculations off hand while the top analysts of the 80s were the ones who knew how to effectively manipulate, visualize and analyze data in spreadsheets (check out this awesome history of spreadsheets). For the hotel industry it’s inevitable that automation and A.I. have been driving a more profitable business model.  The trend is also leading to a new breed of top hoteliers with a different kind of skill set. In our interview with FOSSE creator Dave Berkus, he told us that the hotel general manager of the future is going to require less operational knowhow and more analytical chops. Hoteliers believe that revenue managers will lose their jobs when artificial intelligence gets good enough. I believe that artificial intelligence is going to make revenue management an even more valuable skill because it will take more insight and analytical rigor to stand out from the competition set in a data-driven world. ~Aditya Sanghi At the core of this change is the property management system and few have changed the game for the PMS market like Hotelogix founder and CEO Aditya Sanghi.  Aditya has launched a wildly successful business in some of the toughest markets like Asia and Southeast Asia (due to language and culture differences). The product he and his team have built is so strong that it transcends these cross border discrepancies and is widely used by hoteliers around the world.  Hotelogix is becoming increasingly popular in markets like Europe and the United States - a testament to the incredible company that Sanghi has built. During this interview we learn from Aditya’s unique perspective on life, hotels and business.  We also talk about the future of hotel property management systems and what qualities hotel managers must focus on developing in order to succeed in the A.I. revolution. What was your background prior to starting Hotelogix? Hotelogix was founded by Prabhash Bhatnagar in 2008. Before Hotelogix, Prabhash used to offer web solutions’ services, where he interacted closely with many hotels. That’s where the idea of offering a cloud-based PMS to the mid-segment hotels germinated. I joined Prabhash as a Co-founder, as I was always interested in making a product for the global market, and Cloud PMS gave me a perfect opportunity to do so. Before that, straight out of college, I had co-founded another product-based company, EDISPHERE with my brother Ajay Sanghi. I believe that my early exposure to creating products played a great role in shaping my entrepreneurial journey. What made you decide to jump in and create Hotelogix? I had a burning desire to create a product that had global reach and appeal. India was not known as a hub for products back then and I always believed that products would drive the next phase of economy for the country. I started my corporate life as an entrepreneur. I am known to be a ‘happy-go-lucky’ kind of person and have never feared consequences. I think a major factor in becoming an entrepreneur is to not have a fear of failure. I come from a strong sports background, where winning and losing was part of the game. I believe that losing a battle is an integral part of winning the war, and one must enjoy the whole journey. I think I was better prepared to live the life of an entrepreneur because of my learnings from sports and my family background where ‘risk taking’ is normal. There is also a certain sense of joy and contentment in creating footprints for someone to follow. Any footprints that Hotelogix can create for other companies to follow will be a huge accomplishment for me. Changing the life of a customer is another factor that drives me. And, co-founding Hotelogix gave me a perfect opportunity to do that. I realized that the industry would soon transition to cloud PMS as the entire travel world was poised to go digital, and I took the opportunity to drive this change. On how it started… Prabhash had shared his idea in a ‘New Year Party’ in December 2007 while we were sipping whisky by the fireplace, on a chilly winter night. I think my decision was taken in a couple of hours of our conversation. All the above factors were too compelling for me to continue working in Informatica Business Solutions in Bangalore, where I last worked. I have taken some of the most critical decisions of my life in less than a couple of hours. And, I do not regret any of them. Who was your first customer at Hotelogix? Our first customer was in 2009, a small boutique hotel called Faros Suites from Lonian Islands, Greece. Convinced by our ‘try and buy’ model, they took a free trial of our PMS. Back then, we did not have any sales team and the founding team would respond to chat and email queries. After a few days of self-running trial with assistance on chat and email for concerns and clarifications, Angelo, the owner decided to go ahead with Hotelogix. Their decision to implement Hotelogix did not involve any huge financial investment, but it did involve their time and resource investment. They were moving from pen & paper to adopting our cloud solution. Such a transition is never easy. Wow, so your first customer signed up through a trial, is that something that Hotelogix makes widely available for hotels? Look to any industry and software buyers can try different solutions before they buy.  We believe that is the future for hotels too and have made trials available to any hotelier who wants to take our software for a spin.  Great hotel business starts with a powerful Cloud PMS and hoteliers should be able to see the product in action before they sign on. This is why hotels in more than 100+ countries trust Hotelogix Cloud PMS.  Hotelogix is a smart solution that helps our clients stay organised and connected. If you want to simplify your operations, get more business and keep your guests happier - don't take our word for it - try Hotelogix free. The Hotelogix dashboard is intuitive and easy to learn for new staff Who is one mentor that has really helped you scale the business? That would be Shekhar Kirani, from Accel Partners (our investors). He is also on our board for quite a few years now. Shekhar has taught us that it is ok to make mistakes, fail and move on fast. The day and age is not suited for over analysing things to take decisions. He also taught us to how to think like a funded company, and the switch that needs to be made from the ‘boot strapped’ mind-set. Here are a few more things that we have learned from him – On hiring – If you need one sales person, hire three. Choose the best person for the job without losing time. If more than one of them turn out to be good, it is never considered as a bad investment. On our website that is expected to generate demand – The first fold of your home page is for humans, and rest is for Google. Look at your website from that perspective. Don’t overly spend time trying to beautify what pleases the human eye but has no bearing on Google. On any process, like mailers to be sent once a form fill is done on the website - Just copy the follow up mails from some service that is successful and don’t waste time recreating it.  On focus: Shekhar has also worked closely with us to bring in lot of focus in the way we think of the road ahead. This helps us choose the next two battles to win, rather than going all out and not winning anything. Hotelogix team building exercise  What's one commonly held belief that most hoteliers believe to be true in your niche that actually is false? For example: Hoteliers believe that revenue managers will lose their jobs when artificial intelligence gets good enough. I believe that artificial intelligence is going to make revenue management an even more valuable skill because it will take more insight and analytical rigor to stand out from the competition set in a data-driven world. Hoteliers are used to looking at PMS as a cost centre of the hotel. With the maturity of Cloud PMS, the paradigm has changed. A PMS should not be considered as cost, but as a system that will help them grow revenues and business. Also, for most hoteliers, deciding on PMS is an operational decision whereas I feel it should be more of a strategic decision.   What's the most surprising thing you've learned about scaling technology into hotels? The most important thing that I have learned is the difference between products for a vertical vs. horizontal industry. When you are looking at a vertical industry like hospitality, you can’t ensure a frictionless scale-up unless you understand the behaviour of even the housekeeping staff. It requires going deeper into the domain and environment. Another great learning is to choose the battles to fight. ‘Is this the right time to solve this problem?’ is one question to be answered. Gut feeling is important but scaling up needs data backing. Instinct should get things on the table for consideration, but one needs to get to data points to decide on it. Thirdly, support is the most critical aspect of serving a hotel. Even if the product is not evolving and innovating as quickly, one must spend disproportionate time trying to understand how you can be more effective in your support. Is there a company that has been a particularly good partner for you? Yes. We have been partnering with several third-party solution providers to help hotels leverage the power of cloud technology. Some of them have been quite important to us. They are - Vertical Booking Channel Manager - The integration we did with Vertical Booking was first-of-its-kind back then. It was a complete two-way integration to support very critical aspects of OTA distribution like contract allotment vs free sale. Vertical Booking also stood alongside as a robust solution and the integrated offering is still what our customers enjoy. This was the first channel manager integration with Hotelogix and our customers saw instant benefits in terms of nullifying double bookings, getting more OTA bookings, increasing revenue and many more. TripAdvisor Review Express - Review Collection automation, and ability to influence reputation from Hotelogix PMS was the perfect thing to happen. Hotelogix was mainly a solution positioned for independent hotels and we have always believed that reviews are a great leveller between independent hotels and brands. Our customers saw how Hotelogix and Review Express integration seamlessly improved their TripAdvisor ratings, that benefitted them in terms of better ARR and more bookings. Where do you see Hotelogix in 5 years? 5 years from now, I imagine Hotelogix to be a word that is synonymous with Cloud PMS. Hotelogix will be more like an Operating System for hotels, providing various services on top of its PMS platform. We will be a product that is associated with simplicity that drives great customer value. We will be known as a catalyst to this change of bringing about automation to the mid and small sized hotels, and driving the change from on-premise to cloud-based systems for running operations. More objectively, Hotelogix will be the largest Cloud PMS in the South Asia and Southeast Asia markets and will be in the top 3 leading products in developed geographies like the North American market. How will the property management system and overall hotel management software space change in the next 5-10 years? Today, Hotelogix is mainly serving semi-service and limited-service independent and group properties like Hotels, Resorts, Apart Hotels, B&Bs, Hostels and more. You will see specialized product offerings for these different property types. You will also see Hotelogix becoming a key player in anything that needs booking of a room/desk like corporate housing and co-working spaces. Hotelogix as a brand will become a ‘Gold Standard’ in the industry and will be adopted by hotel management institutes to train their students on PMS. Hotelogix will be that self-serving platform that a hotel business can get up and running within no time – where he can quickly subscribe, adopt and benefit from the solution. This means a lot more smaller hotels will be able to avail of our solution without having to go through adoption challenges that come with a new PMS. Hotelogix is highly passionate about small to mid-sized hotel businesses. For a very long time, this segment didn’t have access to great technology as service providers across the globe concentrated on the five starred community, like Opera and Travelclick. Things are changing now. Tech providers are focusing on this segment as adoption of technology lagged in this sector. The popularity of this segment has also been purely driven by market dynamics, where travelers are now choosing to stay in independents and smaller properties. So, it’s time to focus on enhancing the guest experience for such properties. The community should look at creating more services/products that are geared towards the guest. Treating them like 5-star guests by leveraging AI driven technology can be used to serve and monetize better.                                                    What are some of Hotelogix's recent product innovations that hoteliers should be aware of? Hotelogix has released its Developer platform. Using this, third parties can develop apps on Hotelogix. Our firm belief is that hotel brands will become more like consumer tech businesses (like Amazon), and each one of them would have technology at the forefront to drive their brand strategy. This would mean, giving them the flexibility to develop apps that are not necessarily provided by us or any vendor, but are customised to their needs. We have toyed with this approach and it has been adopted by a couple of customers. I think this is the ‘Uber’ effect that ‘PMSs’ can provide to brands. Additionally, we would like to promote our Mobile Developer Platform and see if the industry feels it is of value to them. What advice do you have for hotel tech entrepreneurs? It’s a fantastic industry to be in as long as you can empathize with hotels and their guest experience. Hoteliers and hospitality professionals are a very interesting bunch of people. They have many anecdotes to share as they deal with people from all walks of life. Sometimes, entrepreneurs looking to get into the hotel tech space need to be ready to wait it out, if they believe their product will bring value to hoteliers. Like, in the case of Hotelogix, we were clearly ahead of time when we released our Cloud PMS way back in 2009. But now, the environment is great and cloud PMS has emerged as one of the hottest pieces of hospitality technology. Make technology such that it can be seamlessly adopted. A hotel already deals with so many challenges that adoption of something new can become a bigger challenge. Generally, people in operations are the users of technology and your product needs to fit seamlessly in their lives.

Learn how Kevin Brown went from Guest Services Manager to Product Marketer at a $30B dollar hotel tech company in under 4 years

by
Hotel Tech Report

Working as a front desk agent at a hotel is insanely hard work.  Hotel guests have extremely high expectations: they want to be checked in fast, they want amazing service, a 24/7 smile and they want to be upgraded to the best room for free.  They want you to know everything about them but not too much that it’s creepy. They want friendly conversation but they don’t want you to talk too much. Check-in systems break down, reservations are lost, overbookings happen and so much more can go wrong that is completely out of your control.  All that said the buck stops with you as the front desk agent. Rarely will guests ever call your GM to tell them how great you were but they are quick to let your boss know when you’ve messed up in their eyes. So you’re frustrated and stressed behind the front desk - what do you do? If you’re anything like Kevin Brown you’ll find your passion and put in the work to follow your dreams.  Today Kevin Brown is a Product Marketing Manager at Amadeus Hospitality, creator of global hotel management software like Delphi Sales & Catering, HotSOS operations software and core GDS solutions for hotels.  Most front desk managers and housekeeping managers would think that Kevin’s role today is out of reach.  The good news is that your successful career as a technology executive is completely within reach. To get there you’ll need curiosity, outside the box thinking, self guided learning and lots of hard work while your colleagues are going out for drinks after their respective shifts.   Here at Hotel Tech Report we’ve recently documented similar career rises like how Matt Welle parlayed his role as a Hilton sales rep into becoming CEO at Mews Systems, one of the hottest technology startups in the hotel software space and creator of a leading property management system for hotels. “What I wish I understood far earlier in my hotel career is that the hotel and travel industry actually set the standards of service for every other industry out there. The skills you develop in hotels DO translate, and frankly what you learn about service in the hotel industry is cutting edge.” ~Kevin Brown Kevin began his career in hotels at the Cosmopolitan Las Vegas, a property known for its sophisticated technology integrations and infrastructure.  While at the Cosmo, Kevin took every opportunity possible to learn about the technology under the hood of the hotel. His unquenchable thirst for knowledge led him into learning the intricacies of every system in the hotel and developing a clear understanding of what was working as well as what wasn’t.  Kevin took advantage of his role at the hotel to build relationships with technology companies, he became a power user of their products and they began learning from him as much as he was learning from them. When Kevin first met the Customer Experience Manager at Amadeus Hospitality he knew that’s where he wanted to be.  Kevin’s story is an incredible journey that demonstrates how you can leverage your role behind the front desk into a successful technology career so we interviewed him to learn tricks and tips for hoteliers who are thinking about a career in technology down the line.  Remember to build close relationships with your existing technology vendors, try lots of different technology products and never stop learning.   Can you tell us about your career background in hotels? My career in hotels is quite odd since I only worked in one hotel before I became a part of the tech industry.  I originally came from the marketing and production world of the music industry. It was by happenstance stumbled upon an opportunity at The Cosmopolitan of Las Vegas.  During my time there I was able to hold almost every major departmental role in the hotel division; both traveler facing and back of house areas. What I enjoyed most about working in hospitality was the blending of so many cultures and nationalities and how much I could learn from people.  The only part I dislike about the hotel industry is that it is the most overworked and underappreciated industry. What every hotel industry professional has to go through and deal with on a day to day basis is astounding. To create memorable experiences for travelers is truly nothing short of extraordinary, and yet a majority of the time the only feedback hotel staff get from travelers is negative.  Many travelers do not get to peek into how much talent and effort goes into making their stay amazing, and I think hotel staff like room attendants and call center managers deserve recognition for that level of service.   What was one technology that you couldn't live without while working at the front desk? I could not live without any tech that automated my work processes and ability to quickly turn data into knowledge.  Manual process and effort is the absolute bane of our industry, and with the rapid evolution of traveler and group expectations for personalization and quick response times I do not know what I would’ve done without those empowerment tools. I was lucky enough that I was immediately introduced to technology the moment I stepped foot into the hotel industry, and I feel like I was exposed to cutting edge stuff like chatbots, task automation, and traveler profiling years before hoteliers even knew about it.  When the Cosmopolitan opened, the vision of tech integration was a key foundation to the success of the hotel's brand. What would you say is the most widely held misconception that hoteliers have about technology? I think the single biggest misconception is that hoteliers think the solution to their traveler personalization problems is to invest in traveler facing technology and create an omni-channel experience.  The biggest problem hoteliers face is actually their staff turnover. What is the point of having traveler facing technology, without experienced staff that have the right technology to empower them to deliver on the brand experience?  Your staff must always come first if you want to truly personalize and fulfill your brand promise. This means hoteliers need to balance their traveler facing and staff facing investments more effectively. Tell us about your journey from hotelier into the technology industry. I am 100% a geek and love keeping up with the future of technology.  Once I got into hotels, with an immediate exposure to technology, it became a goal of mine to inevitably work with hotel technology. When I was a customer many vendors just wouldn’t listen to the real pain points that my teams had.  Many vendors that I was exposed to were just trying to sell their technology without showing me what value they were bringing to solve an actual problem that we had.  I developed a strong point of view on what great vendors did and what bad ones did so that I could start adding value and also to help me identify where I’d ultimately want to work. When I met my CEM (Customer Experience Manager) with Amadeus, he and I struck a solid relationship that built over time into a really strong partnership.  When my CEM decided to get back into hotel operations, he asked me if I wanted to replace him. Every staff member I met from Amadeus was solely focused on solving problems for their customers.  After my interview with my soon to be leaders, and learning that almost every one of my teammates worked in hotels in the past, I knew I had found my new home. The rest is history! What was the most challenging part of moving from hotels into technology? There really was no challenge for me.  For me, the adjustment was so surreal to see how greener the side of this world is that suits my passions when compared to the constant, fast-paced nature of hotel operations in Las Vegas.  I have to admit, I am lucky beyond measure to let my inner geek out, travel, meet incredibly brilliant people I can learn from, and tell stories that have real meaning for our industry. You obviously loved Amadeus as a customer even before you worked there, what is it that stood out to you about the company? Hospitality is all about the human connection and a property’s ability to deliver positive experiences for guests. Amadeus’ technology solutions provide cloud-native capabilities for the Central Reservations System, Property Management System, Sales & Event Management, Business Intelligence, Media, Guest Management solutions, and Service Optimization. These solutions not only cover the entire life-cycle of a guests’ journey, but offer properties the added benefits of usability, functionality, and visibility into guest data. This represents a game changer for the industry, as venues commonly work with multiple technology vendors and have fragmented views of their guests. Imagine that you're going to open the hotel of your dreams tomorrow.  What kind of hotel would it be? My dream hotel to open would be independent, targeted at middle upper to luxury travelers.  It would be small with about 75-100 rooms in the heart of Chicago or Las Vegas that catered to music, art, and entertainment with a 40’s-50’s post modern flair.  I would also ensure that the property had tactful touches of advanced technology bordering on science fiction levels of experience. I would love to find the right way to bring back the big band era style of hospitality.  That post-modern design, and the elegance back then was so timeless. Pairing that timelessness with technology would really be unique in a market so saturated with the same kinds of offerings. I would name it The Indigo.  Not only do I enjoy the color, but indigo dye has a really interesting history and it was one of the largest influencers in the globalization of the world. From a technology perspective I would focus on building the hotel with the best infrastructure out there so it was future proof for the next 10 years like fiber lines, BLE, mesh sensors, and building management automation.  Otherwise, if I didn’t I would have to keep upgrading every other year or so which is so much more expensive in the long run. I would actually highly limit traveler facing technology, and be tasteful with what channels and tech travelers were exposed to.  I would then invest in the best staff facing development tools and technology money could buy to ensure that  my staff could work smarter and not harder. I believe staff should always come before the guest, so I would want make every effort to ensure my staff to have every tool they need to easily conduct their day, maintain building integrity, and have knowledge about any traveler they interact with to make the ecosystem engaging and meaningful for both staff and travelers we would host. What's one piece of advice you have for hoteliers who have dreams of working in technology one day? Surprisingly, there are many hospitality tech vendors out there in the world with a majority of staff that have never worked for a hotel a day in their lives.  Because of this problem, I think we actually need more hoteliers to move into the tech space than ever before. Thankfully with Amadeus, I am surrounded by decades of hotel experience between my teammates, but almost everyone I work with shared a similar sentiment when they were in hotel operations. Many hoteliers think the moment the work in a hotel, they are sucked into a vacuum of an industry they cannot get out of, and that their skills cannot translate to other industries because travel is so specific.  What I wish I understood far earlier in my hotel career is that the hotel and travel industry actually set the standards of service for every other industry out there. The skills you develop in hotels DO translate, and frankly what you learn about service in the hotel industry is cutting edge. It takes years for other industry sectors to adopt hotel industry best practices, so you have more to your advantage than you think. What's one podcast, newsletter or book that you recommend hoteliers read if they'd like to eventually move into tech? Read everything by Malcolm Gladwell.  Blink, The Tipping Point, David and Goliath, read all of his stuff. His work opened my mind to new perspectives about how to help others, learn, and gain a greater understanding about what it means to be in service to others. Hospitality is about engaging with people, and dealing with human problems.  There is no uniqueness to the problems hoteliers face every day. Travel technology needs as much humanity as possible because travel is all about connecting with a place, with people, and with yourself. What is your favorite hotel in the world? As much as I have thought about this, I honestly cannot pick a favorite hotel in the world.  It is just too hard because every great hotel I have stayed at has always offered something different that I enjoy.  Each one stands out in its own way. However, I can say this: I think the best hotels in the world are the ones that anticipate my behavior and needs based on what they know about me, especially if they greet me by using my name. What is the most exciting technology you've seen in the hotel tech space that is not built by your own company? Why? Mesh networks and beacon technology.  I think that is one of the most impressive future hardware developments not only for hospitality, but for the world.  While it is an extremely fine line – where many data collectors have pushed the creepy line to the edge with tech like this – I think that mesh network and beacon technology can truly enhance the lives of travelers and consumers alike. What is one thing that most people don't know about you? I am an identical twin.

(Podcast) FOSSE creator Dave Berkus uses lessons from history to predict the future of hotel technology

by
Hotel Tech Report

In this episode we chat with Dave Berkus, one of the most prolific angel investors of all time.  Dave is the creator of FOSSE - the property management system that Marriott used for nearly 4 decades.  He is one of the most storied entrepreneurs in hotel technology and has invested in countless travel technology startups.   In the interview we cover topics such as: - How Dave landed the deal with Marriott to license his software - Why Marriott used FOSSE PMS for almost 4 decades - Why hotels in the future may not even need a property management system - The increasing importance of CRM, Business Intelligence and CRS - Why hotel general managers need to sharpen up on new skills or be replaced by robots   Enjoy the full podcast above, followed by a transcript of our conversation. Outside of the points covered above, Berkus shares the fascinating foundational story of the first property and yield management tools for hotels. *** Jordan Hollander: So I think there's something like 700 property management system vendors globally on the market today. I know that you weren't the first but what number were you? Dave Berkus: I think Computerized Lodging Systems was probably the third of the PMS companies. Eco was the first in Santa Ana, California. IBM was the second, and then there are several of us that contend that we were the third. But it was early. It was 1974 when I wrote it, and 1976 when it first began being installed in hotels. Lucky for me, the IBM system was being installed at the brand new Bonaventure Hotel in Los Angeles and the Aladdin Hotel in Las Vegas. Both of those IT managers gave me a chance to sit through a little bit of the process, and the night audits. From that, I had the idea that I could do it better and faster and cheaper with a mini computer and that's how it all began. That same Miramar Sheraton was the first customer. JH: So you created a property management system business in the days before most hoteliers knew what a property management system even was. What was the growth like in those early days? Was it really slow to start out? DB: From 800,000 in the first year to two million to 4 to 12 to 18 to 24 to 30 million. Then these are all 1980, 1981, 2982 and 1983 dollars.  About the same as a hundred million dollar business today. JH: Wow, those are some numbers that startups even today almost four decades later would be pretty happy with. A lot of companies think that the only way to get to that kind of scale is through enterprise deals, and I know that you pioneered one of the early ones. Can you talk about the partnership that you had with Marriott DB: I licensed it to Marriott in 1982. Marriott was to use it for a brand new concept that was being developed called Courtyard. They told me there would be 50 Courtyards, so we licensed it accordingly, and went through all the effort of getting ready to put multiple hotels on a single mini computer, which was rare, but I had done it numerous times for other smaller chains. We got three million dollars from Marriott for a universal license for the Courtyard Hotels. That was a lot of money back in those days. We sold them the MAI hardware and the usual markup was about 25%. So I can look at about 14 million dollars that we billed Marriott. So that's not bad at all. But they had the rights. I had no idea that Marriott would then begin to call this FOSSE and distribute it through Springfield, Fairfield, Residence Inns, all of their auxiliary products other than the Marriott and JW Marriott branded hotels. Today, it is now 36 years later. They are just coming to end of life on using it in 2,200 hotels. JH: To most of our listeners, it's going to be pretty unbelievable that a company like Marriott kept the same systems in place for almost 40 years -- especially a company like that that's known for being at the forefront of technology. But I'd like to point out that it's really not just Marriott. We've had some massive Innovations in the consumer and industrial sector when it comes to technology, things like cloud computing and universal access to Wi-Fi. Despite all of this, there's been really no rethinking of what it means to be a property management system and the job to be done. Can you talk about where you see the property management system playing a role in the hotel tech stack of the future? DB: The real question is where were we way back in the 80s when this became the absolute mandate for every hotel over 15 rooms, and where are we today? That story is the story we need to concentrate on. In 1980 or 82 or 84, all of the central reservation systems were written in the 60s. And they were on mainframes. In fact, some of those systems still survive today despite the fact that Amadeus is rewriting IHGs. There are other systems like Marcia that survive from the 60s. Yes, it's true that the UI has changed but it's still flat files on mainframe computer and that will certainly evolve over time. The central reservation systems own the guest name record; the guest name record is the critical element we need to talk about. The PMS systems are, for the chains at least, becoming increasingly less important, as they handle right now in-house functions only. So guest history, which used to be a gigantic important part of a PMS system has been stripped in most systems and is now very much part of the central reservation system. Whether you want to foam pillow or a special kind of anti-allergic something now is known chain-wide as opposed to just at that property where you made the request way back when. That's important. How many stays you've had and where you've had them: for analytics and Big Data, is really important. In fact, that's one of the things that Cindy Estes Green's company uses now as input from many of the chains to help them to understand better who their customers are, where they're going, and occupancy/future occupancy. Big Data's being used in very important ways but certainly not from the PMS system anymore. That leads to the question of: do we need a PMS system in the future? The answer is, for the short-run, yes. Property-based systems get rid of the problem of dependence upon any form of Ethernet or outside communications. In some areas of the country, the reliability of those systems still is a problem. If we look ahead ten years, and certainly beyond 10 years, it would be easy to see a single cloud based system integrating everything from CRM to reservations to the accounting functions at the properties, all the way through all forms of marketing and follow-through. Then we have a single guest named record that doesn't have to pass through from one system to another to be validated that they are the same -- what happens if someone changes and address when he's standing in front of the front desk -- all of those things go away.   JH: When you say there's going to be a single PMS system or centralized system that's going to take care of all of those functions, do you mean to say that hotels are only going to have one type of software or do you think that there's room for specialists in different categories? DB: So you're always going to have best of breed in some areas. Take for example, revenue management, which is a very important part of all of this. It can either be a feature in a central reservation system or it can control everything else depending on where the real revenue is coming from. So Revenue Management Systems may end up being more important, for example, then CRM systems. Certainly both of them more important than just a simple accounting system at the front desk. We have some things to understand and to evolve over this next half a decade to decade and it's going to be interesting. This is not a stagnant industry, despite the fact that people think that every hotel has a system, therefore the industry is mature. JH: You briefly touched on the growing importance of systems like CRMs, customer relationship management, CRS central reservation systems and even touched on Revenue Management Systems. I know you have quite an extensive history in the revenue management space. Can you talk about your experience there and how it's informed your view on the market today? DB: So I was called at the time by both Marriott and Hyatt, both of them called me to their offices -- Hyatt, Chicago. Marriott, Washington -- to talk about their system and how it could be made into something that was much more. That was something more like the airline system. In the case of Marriott, they had what they had termed tier pricing. You become eighty percent occupied at a future date, then you close to government and other cheap rates. You become 90%, then you raise the rates by 10%. You become 100%, then you raise  the rates some more. That was tier pricing and that's all they had. Hyatt had nothing. So both of them said what can you do? I went home from both of those meetings and said, what can I do? The thought immediately occurred to me to copy the airlines. I happened to be a reseller for Burroughs, which became Unisys. And Burroughs let me in to see what was going on at Piedmont Airlines, and Piedmont had copied Sabre. I mean, this is all very insipid industry, isn't it? So I came in and saw the Piedmont system, came back and said even I can do that better. As I came back on the airplane from seeing the Piedmont system, I was up all night in a overnight flight designing what I thought to be a yield management system that would work for hotels. I wanted something different. Artificial intelligence was one of those terms you threw around back in those days, like we are today. In those days it was much more much more gravitas. So I called somebody I knew who had three programmers from MIT who knew how to program in the LISP  language, which was the programming language of artificial intelligence. It ran on a UNIX-based machine that was made by Texas Instruments. So I found these three programmers and hired them. I went to Texas Instruments, literally by flying to Austin, and having a meeting with them telling them what I intended to do and getting their buy-in. Together, we designed the very first artificial intelligence yield management system. So we had  two systems, two hundred and fifty thousand apiece. The owner of Sonesta refused to pay for it because he thought he could do it on the back of a napkin. I bought back the system from Sonesta and I told my chief programmer  to take this code, forget the fact that it's artificial intelligence, and make it a feature in the reservation system. It probably had 80% of the functionality, which we released as an $8,000 'check the box' feature and virtually every customer we had at the time began to order it. Yield management became something people could afford so they bought it -- even if they didn't use it in many of them didn't. That was the beginning and that was 1988. JH: So that year, 1988, was really the year that hotel started using data to make decisions about pricing globally. It's a huge transformational shift in the industry. As we look forward, what do you think the next 5 10 15 years look like and where some of the most important changes happening in the market? DB: Analytics are everything. Decisions are going to be made by analytics that are created by machines. There are a lot of people who will lose their jobs, and then maybe be retrained or other people take those jobs, that are now menial, especially in the back office. These roles have to be replaced by people or by machine analytics and people then act upon those analytics. The most important single change that's going to come is the fact that every piece of data that arrives at the central source, whether it be from a query and a lost sale, whether it be from a booking at a low price that might have been up-sold, whether it be an honored guest that was rebuffed because there was no occupancy. I'm giving many examples but there are hundreds of them. Each will be analyzed. You're going to find that much more capable decisions will be made to maximize revenue than have ever been possible before based upon AI and data analytics. That's your future. JH:  I definitely agree that business intelligence is a huge part of the future as we get a more sophisticated and granular understanding of where people are coming from, and how profitable certain segments are. To a large extent, hotels are still using some of these tools and datasets of the past and are waiting around on Tuesday for their compset report. DB: You gotta think of STR and Concur and a lot of these others as the equivalent of the central reservation systems of the sixties. It's nice to have them, they just haven't figured out yet how to make it actionable enough to be worth. So little for the money we need to pay today. JH: So STR is up for disruption, property management system, CRS, CRM -- pretty much everything is on the chopping block here. What are some of the most exciting opportunities that you're seeing today? DB: If we look at hotel tech and expand it to travel tech, which is really where Wayfare Ventures, our latest firm investment firm, operates, there are a lot of ways to do things that have nothing to do with what we were used to in the past. If you can get a plane in and out of a gate five minutes faster, and multiply that by the number of planes and gates that there are going in and out of airports in the US, you can save multiple billions of dollars. I mean that sounds strange over a year's time. If you can do the same thing in hotels by better serving a guest, by up selling that guest, by finding out whether guest satisfaction is a problem or an opportunity. Meaning: can you sell them meals even if the meals are delivered by a third party from outside the hotel? Whatever it be, there are a lots of opportunities now for revenue that weren't easily available in the past but are today. But the whole point is if guest satisfaction goes up and guests are able to do things they couldn't do before, like order a meal from text, then you're going to have better revenue and more satisfaction. Those are the ones the applications that are going to make some sense. JH: I agree with you there. We're seeing a huge amount of demand for our guest messaging software on Hotel Tech Report. We also see a lot of hoteliers looking for merchandising and up selling tools that can help them improve the guest experience while generating more revenue per guest, which is really a win-win on both sides. When you look at the investment landscape and your current portfolio, are there any companies that you're really excited about today? DB: Think of the hotel pool, the hotel spa, all of those things -- even the gym -- which lay fallow during many hours a day, especially in city hotels that are principally business occupied. So a little company called Resort Pass, which is one of our companies, came along and said what would happen if we contract with the hotel to bring in outside guests who are members of Resort Pass who make a reservation to use the pool for two hours when the pool would have never been used at all. The answer was these hotels love it because it's ancillary revenue for fixed assets that really have no other form of revenue generation because they're free to the guest. JH: Resort Pass has been really well received by the market. Like you said, it's almost a no-brainer for hotels. Why wouldn't you want to leverage and get some more revenue out of these underutilized spaces? I don't know the Resort Pass team personally, but I know a lot of the other founders that you've invested with, people like Adam and Richard over at Cloudbeds and John and Chris over at Whistle. Are there characteristics that you think really make great entrepreneurs stand out from the pack? DB: I love it when somebody in marketing or sales develops a company and says I feel the pain and let's try and solve the need. As opposed to what I see most often, which is an engineer says I really got an idea and I'm going to make that idea work. It's like pushing the rock up the hill because they didn't do the research. I have good stories about companies that flamed out, including some of my own, that didn't do the research and end up paying the price. JH: I know when you're investing in companies, you will generally look at the founders and see the quality of the team as one of your key drivers or Theses around an investment, but the other huge aspect is how big is the market and what are the market trends going on. So I wanted to ask what are some of the trends that you're seeing in the market and that you think have the strongest legs behind them. DB: That is a moving target. If you were to say I had an app 8 to 10 years ago, we might have been really excited because there weren't enough apps out there. Today, if you say you have an app, we're just gonna face the other way. So the today answer is we're looking very much at AI, robotics and data analytics. Tomorrow is going to be something else and it's going to be more sophisticated. So if I had to answer it today, it's those three things. JH: As we have a large hotelier audience on the show, do you think that the role of a general manager and a hotel is going to change in the coming years? It seems like we're moving away from an operationally-focused GM -- not to say that that's not important anymore -- but in the future, there's actually a huge shift towards being more analytical and almost acting like a product manager. What do you think that the GM of the future looks like? DB: The high-tech keynote that I gave in Toronto two years ago was entitled "Will tech take your job and it was addressed toward those managers and to the financial managers who were there in the audience. The answer is there are so many things that will be taken over -- not necessarily by robotics, that's the cleaning and the other things perhaps delivery to guests -- it's more the kinds of things that a manager has to learn to do to add value. A manager has to be able to add value by adding revenue and by increasing guest satisfaction. Those two things are not operational necessarily. As the operational thing that a manager today normally concentrates on. Tomorrow that manager is going to be a data analyst and he's going to be very much a marketing person, despite the fact that he'll have a department that supposedly assist at the property or in the chain to do that for him or her. JH: And where there's crisis there's always opportunity. I think that the general managers that are able to capitalize on this trend and sharpen up their skills are going to find that there's more opportunity than ever before in this market to add value and really take their careers to the next level.

Hotel tech is a massive investment opportunity and PeakSpan Capital is doubling down

by
Hotel Tech Report

How many hotels are there in the world?  Back in 2012 STR estimated 187,000 hotels with more than 17.5 million rooms globally but we’ve seen estimates from Booking and Expedia north of 300,000 and that figure is growing at a rapid clip.  Hotels have a stigma for being slow to adopt technology but that’s changing quickly as digital natives moves into leadership roles at hotel groups around the world. Hotels are extremely complex businesses to run operationally with lots of moving parts.  How do you price across channels? Which channels do you focus on? How do you manage bookings? How do you service guest requests across shifts? How do you recruit and train new talent in a business with massive turnover? Hotels need software for all aspects of their complex businesses including: finance, revenue, operations, guest experience and sales.  The typical hotel can run on up to 15 different technology systems. Multiply that by the number of hotels in the world and it’s easy to understand this massive market opportunity.   Shockingly, tons of hotels today still run their operations on pen and paper or via on premise systems from decades past.  Cloud computing was a buzzword for the rest of the world back in 2010 but here we are nearly a decade later and hotels are finally catching up. When venture investors look at hotel tech they see the biggest online market in the world (travel) and a massive whitespace for technology companies that can solve real business problems and deliver strong ROIs for hotel clients.  They see a rapidly expanding middle class with discretionary funds for leisure travel and a booming corporate travel market for companies looking to connect employees and clients through meaningful in person experiences. Adding to these macro trends - fast, frictionless API integrations and the low delivery cost of cloud computing catalyze the perfect environment for outsized venture returns. Here at Hotel Tech Report we get tons of calls from investors asking us which companies they should consider investing in but few understand this market like Matt Melymuka at PeakSpan Capital.  Matt and his team at PeakSpan have developed a sophisticated understanding of this nuanced market opportunity and have put money to work in some of the most innovative and successful companies in the space such as Cloudbeds and Zingle. We have yet to meet an investor who understands this market better than PeakSpan so we were lucky to catch up with Matt to understand his view on the market.  Top venture firms like Thayer Ventures and TCV also invest heavily in the space but few offer the level of support and guidance to portfolio companies that Peakspan offers to hotel technology companies. The firm is unique in its thesis driven approach that has identified hotel tech as a key area for investment long before this thesis became mainstream. In this interview we’ll talk about the evolution of hotel management software, how customer messaging platforms are changing the way hotels interact with guests and why hotel tech companies need to build globally distributed teams in order to win.   PeakSpan's Matt Melymuka leads the firm's hospitality practice   How did you get into the wonderful world of venture? I've had the pleasure of working with growth-stage software and technology businesses my whole career, and have been a tech enthusiast my entire life. I started my career in investment banking and then transitioned to principal investing, as I really wanted to work more closely with entrepreneurs and teams who have a shared passion for innovation. While every stage of company development is interesting and unique, I have always focused on companies in the "growth phase", and really believe it is the most intellectually stimulating and exciting phase of evolution - companies that have matured beyond the concept in a garage phase and have answered some of the existential "Can we build it? Will they buy it?" questions, and are looking for a thought partner to provide capital and guidance as they look to navigate the next part of the journey. The challenges and opportunities our teams face are typically related to execution and developing/implementing sensible scaling initiatives, iterating our collective way into the optimal investment plan that drives resilient, sustainable growth and long-term value creation.   How does PeakSpan operate under the hood? PeakSpan has a simple, highly-focused mission: to be the partner of choice for growth-stage, B2B software companies. Our focus manifests itself across every area of our business, but I'll highlight three primary areas, as well as one philosophical tenet that underpins our strategy and approach to working with teams. First, we only invest in business-to-business software companies. Next, we focus on a tight roster of themes (we call them our "BluePrint Market Themes") as a firm, and Hospitality is one of those themes that I lead for PeakSpan. Third, we only invest in emerging growth-stage companies, which are businesses which as noted above have stripped away some of the binary risk levers associated with classic venture capital. The whole point and purpose of our focused approach is to develop true domain expertise in the categories we invest in, to cultivate long-term theses and informed perspectives on segment evolution (market dynamics, nuanced trends, competitive landscape, buyer dynamics, etc.) to enable strategic levels of rapport with the teams we partner with - from the first interaction and every one after that. Every time we meet with an entrepreneur, we should be bringing a distinct or unique insight or perspective to the table (informed by a breadth of experience) and adding value to that entrepreneur or team in some form or fashion. Lastly, we only put senior investment professionals (Partners) who are domain experts in the category at the tip of the spear, doing the first calls/meetings (and every successive call/meeting after that) with the entrepreneur, to enable a peer-to-peer, decision maker-to-decision maker dialogue that we firmly believe is more respectful and human beings prefer.   You've already lead some pretty sizable rounds in hotel management software companies - tell us about those investments. We've invested in i) Cloudbeds, a leader in the cloud-based property management system ("PMS") arena, providing an end-to-end solution encompassing property management/operations and channel management/distribution for independent hotels, hostels, B&Bs and short-term vacation rental owners, and ii) Zingle, a leading provider of guest engagement solutions, enabling hoteliers to deliver personalized communications with their guests across channels, at scale, with high efficiency through the application of AI-enabled automations and intelligent process/workflows. We led the Series B financings for both companies with meaningful 7-figure investments in each business. Cloudbeds offers a truly end-to-end platform, providing hoteliers with the tools and technology required to efficiently identify, attract, engage and convert potential prospects (channel management/distribution), as well as everything required to manage their property on the back end (property management/operations). The platform is easy to use and navigate, encompasses a rich feature set satisfying all core needs, and is offered at a disruptive price point/solution value.  The breadth and depth of Cloudbeds' platform is unmatched in market, and is supported by a best-in-class customer success effort, ensuring client experience is paramount.   Cloudbeds co-founders Adam Harris and Richard Castle ribbon cutting the firm's new San Diego office   Zingle provides a next-generation approach for hoteliers to engage with their guests in a highly-personalized, real-time manner, at scale with tremendous efficiency. The Company's platform gives control of the guest engagement and dialogue back to the hotelier, enabling direct, seemingly bespoke communications with their guests to ensure top tier satisfaction. Zingle intelligently leverages NLP and AI coupled with deliberate, intuitive workflows to deliver these individualized dialogues at scale, with strong efficiency. Guest requests are satisfied in real-time, enabling properties to differentiate through experience, while driving massive ROI through process automations and service efficiencies.   How do you come usually across your investments? In both cases, we had developed a deep perspective and investment thesis on the market opportunity for these businesses informed by our thematic focus, and reached out directly to the founders to start a dialogue. These businesses are exhibiting top tier performance across numerous vectors, and (not surprisingly) they were garnering significant interest from the investment community, so we had to work hard to prove value and demonstrate the impact we can bring as a partner to consummate the partnerships with these amazing teams. We're privileged and humbled to work with both of these companies.   What's one piece of advice you have for hotel tech entrepreneurs when raising capital? Similar to how we execute our own mission at PeakSpan, we're big believers in focus in company development. There is no need to cede ground on overarching vision and market opportunity, but pursue your mission with ruthless prioritization and by setting sensible, incremental goals and milestones, preserving optionality and alignment with your shareholders along the way.  One founder we once worked with had a great quote that I think about every day, noting "Most companies don't die of starvation, but rather indigestion." Biting off more than you can chew and introducing unnecessary operational risk into a business can be toxic, so set reasonable goals, attack them with focus, and then reevaluate and recalibrate as you continue to turn over cards of value creation along the way.   How do you think the hotel management software space will evolve over the next 5-years? Despite all the innovation that has taken place in the sector over the last decade, there remains massive, untapped opportunity and potential in many categories within the hospitality arena. Despite being one of the largest and most dynamic segments of the US and global economy, penetration of cloud-based technologies in the segment remains incredibly low, and the vendor landscape remains tremendously fragmented on a global basis. Cloud-based platforms combined with innovative go-to-market strategies will enable vendors to effectively and efficiently target, acquire and retain clients, delivering powerful solutions to clients across the full spectrum of property types, including the long-tail segment. Industry fragmentation and the disparate nature of data within the hospitality arena will continue to drive the need for systems to be developed with extensibility at their core, enabling quicker, lower cost implementations and seamless communication across platforms. There remain so many areas across the hospitality landscape that are under-penetrated or currently served by solutions that are deficient or ineffective - as an investor, this creates an incredibly compelling and exciting opportunity to partner with amazing entrepreneurial teams to capitalize on these opportunities!     People often say that hotels are a bit slow to adopt technology.  Do you agree? There is definitely some truth to the comment, and one of the main reasons from my perspective is the mission critical nature of the data housed in many of the platforms used by hoteliers today across their operations. This makes it harder to adopt new, innovative solutions than some other categories - even when solutions are better, faster, cheaper and more efficient, there can be operational issues that create friction when considering migration to a new platform.  I believe the tide is turning, however, as new technologies and approaches are reducing those barriers, and awareness/appreciation for the need to evaluate and implement next-gen technologies and (importantly) behavior/process change to drive efficiency across organizations has never been higher.   If you were leaving venture capital tomorrow to start a hotel technology company - what would it be and why? I won't give away my next area of focus, as there are a few areas I am really interested in investing behind, but I will categorically say that I would not want to be competing with Cloudbeds or Zingle. Both of these teams represent everything I look for in the companies I partner with - passion, grit, humility and integrity - and they are quickly establishing true market and thought leadership in their respective segments, supported by best-in-class technology platforms.   What is the most surprising thing that you've learned from investing in hotel tech? The fragmentation of the category globally continues to amaze me. This creates a lot of opportunity, however also (typically) requires the intelligent application of a globally-distributed team to compete on a truly global basis.   What is the best book you've read lately? Sapiens by Yuval Noah Harari is fascinating - I would describe it as Freakonomics for Anthropology. It provides an eye-opening perspective on human kind.  It's not a book, but I'm also completely hooked on the Freakonomics Radio podcast.     What is one thing that most people don't know about you? While I live in New York City and have for more than a decade, I am a die hard Boston sports fan, having grown up in the Boston area. I'll never surrender to the dark side!   For all the startups that might want to pitch in your office, what can you tell them about your investment criteria, etc. to help them decide if they are a good fit for your portfolio? We love to develop relationships early, and I am always interested in meeting with entrepreneurs who are going after strategic segments of the universe. In terms of specific parameters, we look for companies with $3-4M+ ARR, growing rapidly on a capital efficient basis, who haven't raised significant prior institutional capital.  We typically invest anywhere from $7-15M initially, and always look to lead the rounds we invest in.

The 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech 2019

by
Hotel Tech Report

Creating a great work environment is the single biggest determinant of success for any business.  Companies that foster great work environments attract the best people and the best people build the best products. A 2017 study that analyzed 326,000 employee reviews at publicly traded companies found that firms with high employee satisfaction outperformed the overall stock market each year by 135bp (1.35%).  A similar study of 400,000 employee ratings found evidence of a statistical relationship between employee perception and a firm’s future earnings. Sophisticated enterprise software buyers know that when they partner with a technology company, they are buying into not just its products but its vision, mission and team.  These buyers perform due diligence to understand the viability of any business that they plan to partner with and a deep analysis of employee satisfaction and vendor culture is part of that process.  Hotel Tech Report hosts this award not just to help the community find great jobs, but also to help fast track diligence for hotel tech buyers who want to learn about the best vendors to work with. Understanding organizational culture is important for software buyers because companies that create great work environments retain employees longer, service customers better and innovate faster. Perks like ping pong tables,  office snacks and vacation days are nice,  but our 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech list is determined by the glue that holds companies together. Each year we ask thousands of employees at hotel tech companies how they feel about their employers and anonymize the results.  The 2019 scoring is based on 7 key data points: Work-life balance: Please rate how well your employer promotes work/life balance. Personal development: How much importance does your employer place on your own personal development? Gender equality: How would you rate the opportunities available to women in your firm? Employee confidence: How much confidence do you have in the future of your company? Values alignment: How well do your values align with the culture of your organization? Employee engagement: How passionate are employees about the company? Growth prospects: How many open roles are there for your employees to grow into?   Without further adieu we give you 2019's 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech:       10. Triptease Our research on Triptease validates that the Company truly lives and breathes the ethos of its name.  Employees consistently cited off-sites and team trips as the highlights of their year. According to LinkedIn data, Triptease has grown its employee count 72% in the last 2 years.  Sometimes when companies grow that quickly, it’s hard to maintain a great team culture. With the team spread all around the world, Triptease brings new employees for training and team building to the LondonHQ.  New employees rave about the experience for the learning and friendships that come from it. Other notable events include Triptease’s renowned Direct Booking Summits (America, Europe, Asia) and a company wide Christmas party in Madrid (let us know if you need HTR on the scene to cover next year’s party - this one sounded like a rager!).  Triptease employees are constantly blown away by how much management cares. One employee cited an unexpected bonus for a month of killer performance and another described to us how open management is to employee travel focused on career development. Ultimately, Triptease is one a big happy family and employees around the world are constantly connecting through a multitude team building activities and trips.  Employees love the fast paced nature of consistently launching new innovative products. Check out open positions at Triptease     9. GuestRevu GuestRevu had a year in which critical company milestones rallied the team together.  Not only did GuestRevu acquire a large regional competitor but the team also launched a major version update that required all hands on deck.  Despite all the craziness of rapid growth, a new version launch and a major acquisition - one employee raved to Hotel Tech Report about how supportive the entire team was during the loss of a loved one.  Another told us that she often needs to bring her 9-year old to work where he is always made to feel welcome and at home. The firm is so committed to its team that it sent out a company wide survey asking what employees wanted to learn and then purchased everyone access to Udemy classes to help them develop those new skills. The marketing team took classes on video editing and is already leveraging those skills to develop a series of video case studies for GuestRevu. Check out open positions at GuestRevu     8. Beekeeper For a company building software to help teammates communicate better - Beekeeper takes employee engagement and experience very seriously internally.  As one employee told us, “Beekeeper does an excellent job of capturing feedback and always checking in to understand where you want to go and providing actionable feedback and support to get you there.” The Company promotes a healthy lifestyle through lunchtime sports and CrossFit.  Taking it one step further, Beekeeper offers unlimited PTO and flexible work schedules to accommodate the expectations of the modern workforce. Beekeeper’s culture exudes transparency and humility. One employee told us that the team was initially put off by management’s decision to require employees to clean dishes at an off site before they realized that this was all part of the team building.  This employee told us that the people they ended up washing dishes with ended up being their closest new friends and that the experience gave them an opportunity to bond in a way that most rarely do in the modern workplace. Another employee told us about a rewarding experience they had volunteering together at a homeless shelter. The team’s humility shined through further when a new employee (2 weeks in) alerted management about tensions between two departments.  Much to their surprise both teams were thrilled to hear their new colleague’s insight and showed their appreciation. Management even went one step further offering this individual to run a huge cross-departmental retrospective 5 weeks into their job. It’s not often that companies are so open to self-reflection and change coming from a new junior hire and we really admire the culture that Beekeeper has nurtured. Check out open positions at Beekeeper       7. Hotel Effectiveness Hotel Effectiveness is an incredibly successful company that largely flies under the radar of hotel tech buzz.  The Company provides revolutionary labor management software that we’ve covered here.  If there’s one word that sums up the Hotel Effectiveness team culture - it’s ‘performance’.  Employees are unilaterally motivated by consistently hitting lofty sales goals time and again.  As a testament to this performance driven culture - one employee told us that one time their boss had to tell them to go home early and make some time for family when they were overworking themselves.  This performance culture isn’t mandated from the top and is completely grassroots in that it’s driven by internal employee motivation and ambition. While you can expect to work alongside incredibly driven and ambitious colleagues at Hotel Effectiveness - they definitely know how to have a good time host a hilarious annual white elephant Christmas party. Check out open positions at Hotel Effectiveness     6. Revinate Revinate’s culture is characterized by constant iteration and testing.  The Company is always trying new things and that affords a ton of learning opportunities to team members.  This year while the technical team executed a full shift from hosted data center to cloud based AWS infrastructure the sales and marketing teams were tasked to rapidly grow the install base of the Revinate Marketing product.  Both teams executed with near perfection and everyone celebrated with an impromptu party where key team members reflected on the incredible achievements of such a relatively short time period. Revinate embodies the startup spirit with enterprise scale.  Revinate CEO Marc Heyneker is deeply involved in the day to day operations of the business and employees across the organization rave about his ability to inspire and teach. One employee told us a story about a serious head injury that left this person working remotely for several months.  His team made sure to make him feel included as part of the office through the entire time away but that was only the beginning. The employee recalled being shocked that over a year after his injury Heyneker pulled him aside to check in on his health and to ask what he could do personally to help. Check out open positions at Revinate     5. Cloudbeds Cloudbeds management recently surprised its team with a beautiful new San Diego headquarters equipped with a 14 ft indoor willow tree, a massive outdoor workspace, game areas, stand up workstations and more.  The environment is fun, welcoming and echoes the company theme - all things travel. Cloudbeds has an extensive wellness program because management knows that healthy employees are productive ones. This productivity paid off in 2018 where Cloudbeds achieved #75 on Inc Magazine’s fastest growing companies list.  How are they growing so fast you ask? Well it’s probably because CEO Adam Harris told the team he’d dance to any song of their choosing. We will keep you posted once we get our hands on the video from Harris’ co-founder Richard Castle. The Company maintains several internal chat threads exclusively for team sharing of funny photos, videos and memes - so we expect the video to surface there as well.  All jokes aside, Cloudbeds takes both employee and team growth very seriously. Each employee has weekly 1-1 meetings to review competencies and revisit their path to promotion. The Company is growing rapidly and there are constant opportunities for employees who prove themselves. Cloudbeds is also a 100% flexible organization where remote employees and those stationed at the headquarters all enjoy the ability to work from anywhere anytime.  Cloudbeds has fostered a culture where its team members truly enjoy hanging outside of work and building friendships important for their personal and professional lives. Several Ukrainian teammates trained for a marathon together and one customer success rep has leveraged her friendship with the UX designers to pursue her passion for design. After taking several courses independently the UX team has given her several opportunities to practice her skills on live projects. Check out open positions at Cloudbeds       4. Clock Software Clock Software is another company on our list that is growing insanely fast but doesn’t take itself too seriously.  One Clock employee told us that on their birthday coworkers wrapped his entire workstation and even put a bow on it.  The only complaint we heard from Clock Software team members was that they are growing too fast and needed more staff to manage the growth.  This is the best kind of problem to have. Clock is the oldest company on our list and celebrated their 22nd anniversary this year - a testament to the longevity of the business.  Clock founder Krasimir Trapchev has focused on growing the client base without scaling the team too quickly. Trapchev is all about execution and he’s prioritized building a long term sustainable business over rapid scaling which is extremely unique in an environment where funding is so plentiful that CryptoKitties, a company that enables users to breed and trade digital cats can raise $15M.  Clock is now starting to scale the team so it can take on more enterprise clients and its employees are fired up.  If you want to learn how to build a real business without massive amounts of venture capital - check out open jobs at Clock because Trapchev is the Mr. Miyagi of entrepreneurship and you’d be wise to make yourself his Karate Kid. Check out open positions at Clock     3. Screen Pilot Screen Pilot takes team building very seriously with activities like bubble soccer, a British Bakeoff (it’s ok we Googled it, too), volunteering at an animal shelter, an escape room and even a city wide scavenger hunt around its hometown in Denver.  The scavenger hunt and Screen Pilot’s quarterly volunteer days are a testament to Screen Pilot’s commitment to the surrounding community. While Screen Pilot is a top rated digital marketing agency, it’s a technology innovator as much as a marketing service provider.  The Company has created what it calls SP Labs where employees brainstorm ways to better leverage technology to help its clients win more direct bookings. Think of SP Labs like an ongoing internal hackathon with dedicated teams set on solving acute problems for clients. It’s this kind of innovative mindset that lead Screen Pilot to a 2018 Adrian Award for social content creation. Check out open positions at Screenpilot     2. Mews Systems If you caught the Mews Systems booth at WTM you might think that it was a rocket science company with all the lab coats and futuristic decor that earned it the Best Stand Award.  While Mews isn’t quite a rocket science company it is taking off like a rocketship having doubled its client base in the second half of 2018 alone. To support that kind of insane customer growth Mews had to 4x its team size in the last year - the fastest growth of any company in our list.  So how can a company even hire that fast? Mews attracts 40% of new hires via referrals. If that doesn’t say something about the company culture we don’t know what does. With that kind of insane growth supported by an $8M Series A in June you’d think it’s all business but Mews employees say it’s very much a “work hard, play hard” culture.  One employee told us that one of his favorite things about working at Mews is “daily banter with the boizz” - this kind of hilariousness is exactly what’s helped the Company take the industry by storm. Hoteliers everywhere are sick of generic jargon and boring brand marketing from hotel tech firms and Mews is the antidote. Employees frequently cite founder Richard Valtr and CEO Matt Welle as saying “At Mews we are family and we will take care of any family member in need."  Mews also boasts an extremely inclusive culture illustrated by the firm’s attendance at the Prague Pride celebration wearing special edition Mews gear to the event. The Company also has a shared value culture at its core and participated in UK Byte Night last year.  Byte Night prevents youth homelessness by having corporate teams sleep in the streets to raise awareness and funds for the cause.  Richard and team participated which is really cool and a statement to the quality of people that you’ll work with when you join the Mews team. Check out open positions at Mews     1. ALICE ALICE employees widely agreed that quarterly town hall meetings are the foundation of ALICE’s connected team culture.  ALICE staff loves the opportunity to connect with colleagues from around the world, align around the company vision and get transparency into how the business is performing at a macro level. More than doubling its size in 2018, ALICE unsurprisingly had to upgrade its HQ office to add more space and acquire obligatory startup amenities like a cold brew keg, stand up desks and lockers.  ALICE goes so much deeper for its team and invests heavily in career development. Employees participate in a company wide book club, receive access to free Udemy courses and are nurtured along a very clear path to promotion.  ALICE employees talk about the clarity of path to promotion more than any other company’s employees on our list. Setting a clear path to promotion is important for making employees feel like they’re constantly progressing and puts them at ease knowing that there’s always room to grow internally.  Major consulting firms like BCG and McKinsey have perfected this art but rarely do we see startups who are able to provide such transparency to their staff - kudos ALICE management.One employee told us that she was promoted 4 times in the last 3 years - a testament to ALICE’s ability to reward top employees.  Even a remote worker was able to win ALICE’s Culture and Values Award twice in 6 months. This individual told us that they felt like they were on an island while working previous remote jobs - but felt very connected to the inclusive ALICE team. ALICE acquired GoConcierge this year and is making serious strides with major enterprise clients after its $30M Series B funding - a testament to the strong prospects for the firm and probably why employee confidence in the firm is best in class.  “When you receive a high five from the CEO, that says a lot about the culture of the company,” says one team member. High fives all around! Check out open positions at ALICE

This is the tech you need to streamline your hotel's operations

by
Hotel Tech Report

As any hotelier can attest, a modern hotel operation is a tangle of systems and technologies. Navigating the options can be overwhelming and frustrating, mainly because it's impossible to know how reliable the technology is -- or how responsive customer service will be during the inevitable outage. With such high-stakes, it's easy to get caught up in the details or to delay making a final decision. “For an industry that’s fundamentally about human interaction, it’s ironic that technology has come to be such a big deal. But in today’s and tomorrow’s world, being strategic about how you allocate your tech investment resources is critical to the hospitality mission.” -Mark Van Amerongen, COO, Prism Hotels & Resorts To get to the nirvana of seamless hotel operations, it takes the best technology, customized according to each property’s needs. Irrespective of how long it takes to identify these solutions, the result should be a technology suite that works well together and is adaptable to ever-evolving guest expectations. Security and data protection should also be a priority as a hotel builds out its modern hotel operations tech stack. While your hotel may not need technology from all of these categories, each category has its own merits to carefully consider. Ask tough questions, request introductions to existing customers to prove further, and don’t rush into a decision on your hotel’s operating systems.   Property management systems (PMS) The broadest category of software for hotel operations is the property management system. It structures the entire hotel operation, acting as the centralized resource across the property. From housekeeping to reservation management, everything flows through the PMS. Without a PMS, a modern hotel would struggle to thrive. Yet many hotels remain constrained by a legacy system that doesn't offer some of the most important features for a hotel to remain competitive in today's environment. So what makes a great hotel property management system? Paraphrasing an old idiom in business, the best PMS is the one you use. You want to provide the most intuitive and reliable system to empower your staff. You don't want to implement a system that frustrates and confuses. Inevitably, turnover increases and the guest experience suffers.     When evaluating potential solutions, consider the interplay between the PMS and the rest of your technology. Given the centralized role of the PMS, it's important that all software in a hotel’s tech stack integrate seamlessly. Knowing that a new PMS sits seamlessly within an existing tech stack is vital. You also want the flexibility to grow with your PMS is good peace-of-mind for hotel GMs. Module add-ons, such as for spa, revenue management, guest CRM, group functionality, and channel management, can boost the utility of the PMS without having to evaluate and onboard another vendor. Ideally, each tool has a real-time connection with the PMS to avoid latency and inaccurate data. In addition to integrations and connectivity, here are three other important features when evaluating a PMS vendor: Approach to customer service. Many features in hospitality technology are commodified, but customer service isn’t one. Helpful, responsive, consultative, always available -- these are all words you want to hear from existing customers as you evaluate your options. Automation. Automation is beautiful. It helps reduce errors from manual data entry, which in turn reduces labor cost associated with manual inputs. The labor can then be allocated to something The greater impact. The consistency of both staff and guest experience is also improved, which makes everyone happier. Real-time dashboard.  A centralized source of real-time information about your hotel proves invaluable over time. At a glance, everything is laid out for action. With this real-time view, issues can be handled quickly and efficiently before they escalate, and data can be deployed to rally staff around performance targets. The PMS is one of the most mission-critical software, so be thorough in your questioning of potential solutions. The most pressing question is how a company approaches customer support. Features can be copied; customer service can’t. When there's an issue with the PMS, you absolutely need the peace-of-mind that someone will be there to take your call and fix the problem.     Staff collaboration In an intensive operation such as a hotel, keeping the staff organized and on track is a challenge. Reliance on paper checklists, manual work assignments, and paper logbooks can lead to inefficiencies, double-work, and communication miscues. Upgrading to modern staff collaboration software automates processes to ensure more consistency across the various departments, increases transparency as far as performance, and unites communications into a centralized hub for easy management. When the team is on the same page, the hotel operates more smoothly and provides an enhanced guest experience. Another benefit of this technology is that it expands the role of the front desk into sales. By empowering the front desk team to enter leads and collaborate with sales, more revenue is achievable. These are the most impactful features to look for in staff collaboration tools for hotels: Intelligent routing. The technology should help teams work together more effectively to improve the guest experience. Guest want consistent responses, whether they communicate via email, text, or face-to-face. Software that intelligently routes guest request to the correct department means that there's less time spent directing traffic and more time spent on the task itself. Automations. Even the most well-trained staff makes mistakes. Staff management and collaboration software can automate away some of these mistakes by providing a consistent operational checklist. For example, upon completing one task, the system can assign another task based on that completion. Schedule task can also keep properties maintained overtime, without having to remember critical tasks or assign them manually. Reports, analytics, and audits. One of the benefits of using staff management technology is increased productivity. This is not conceptual: analytics and reports chart progress and identify areas for improvement with particular departments or team members. Auditing a task’s history also boosts visibility into potential bottlenecks.  After finding the vendors that have the desired features, the first question to ask them is how easy the software is to learn. Not every team member is tech-savvy, so the training and onboarding process is critical for successful adoption of a staff management tool.     Concierge software Guest-facing functions have the potential to make or break a guest experience. The importance of the concierge varies, depending on hotel category. For those hotels that haven’t traditionally deployed a concierge, technology can actually make this a cost-efficient perk to offer. For hotels with an existing concierge, concierge software makes the team more efficient and accurate with their guest recommendations. In the order of importance, look for hotel concierge software that provides: Cross-channel communications. Portability across channels is important to guests. They may go to the desk, and then want the concierge’s recommendations via mobile. The software should make this easy to do for concierges, and easy to access for guests. The ultimate win is to make a seamless experience no matter who is staffing the desk. PMS/CRM integration. Guest profiles shouldn't live independently of other systems. The richness of a guest profile Defines how successful Hotel can be in properly personalizing the experience. Data should flow across these systems to enhance the guest experience, reduce double-work, and make the concierge more impactful. Knowledge base. It should be simple to add knowledge to a repository to pull from. Concierge recommendations should be prompt and accurate; a knowledge base that collects important information makes for stronger curation skills. When discussing your needs with a potential vendor, start by asking about the typical implementation timeline and process. There may be factors that delay implementation, such as integrating with other systems, so you want to be clear what’s expected on your end -- and how long it will take on their end.     Housekeeping management software As guests check in and check out of the hotel each day, housekeeping has a lot to keep track of. In addition to making sure that rooms are available for incoming guests, each room turn must meet service specifications. Housekeeping processes and communications must be on-point to make this all happen smoothly. Housekeeping management technology eliminates uncertainty and helps each housekeeper manage daily workflow without sacrificing quality. The software also allows reliable tracking of performance across the entire department. To achieve these productivity gains, here are some of the most critical features of housekeeping management software: A focus on productivity. The right housekeeping management software helps your staff to be more productive through greater transparency and accountability. Look for software that provides detailed reports and helps you motivate your staff to improve performance over time. Mobile. This is obvious but often overlooked. Your stuff is going to be moving about the property and the tools need to move with them. It doesn't make much sense to have a digital system that requires a paper printout. Another key point: The best technology timestamps key events, delivering reliable data essential for accurate reporting. Real-time notifications. On-the-fly changes to room availability happen; For example, a priority guest requests early check-in for a suite that still needs cleaning. The system should ping the housekeeping staff in real-time to adjust priorities in real time. When it comes to housekeeping management, the most pressing question is usually how the solution integrates with existing systems, especially the PMS. Direct integration eliminates duplicate data entry, supports data integrity, and allows you to use the best systems for each department.     Guest feedback software Gathering guest feedback, and using that data to benchmark progress against performance targets, is a critical part of a hotel’s operations. Guest feedback gives the GM a near-real-time view of the guest experience, helping to identify areas for improvement and immediate attention. As a hotel incorporates guest feedback, it improves. A responsive management team can transform negative feedback into a positive experience that builds goodwill. As more sites pop-up with reviews, from Facebook to Google to lesser-known brands, a hotel’s reputation demands a modern solution that starts with guest feedback. If you can catch the bad feedback before it's posted in a review, and encourage the best experiences to be shared, then you’ve set your hotel’s reputation on track. This drives more new business, alongside encouraging more repeat business from guests that feel heard. When you're looking to manage your reputation with software for guest feedback, you’ll want the following: Guest history. It should be clear how many times a guest has provided feedback so that your team can communicate in a more personal and relevant way with the guest. These attributes are visible pieces of a guest’s profile. Responsive design. Guests will likely complete surveys or provide feedback via a mobile device. All surveys and forms should look just as good on mobile as on desktop. Integration. If the feedback loop lives only in the guest feedback system, it may prevent that feedback from being acted upon quickly. PMS metadata can provide that context right in the feedback tool, allowing a potential issue (such as a broken HVAC system) to be routed instantly to the right department. For a detailed insight into a vendor’s approach to guest feedback, ask them for references. This is the most important questions for such a critical guest-facing tool. You'll learn more from the implementation experiences of other hotels than from the vendor itself. Of course, this advice extends to all vendors; however, with guest-facing solutions, it’s especially useful to know how (and if) a vendor has delivered on its promises to other hotels.    

The future of hotel software is here: instant implementation, free integrations and apps for everything

by
Hotel Tech Report

Back when I worked in hotels drones were all the rage.  Amazon had announced that it was planning to make drone deliveries in the not so distant future and every major news outlet was covering the craze. Our team leveraged this trend to come up with a genius idea.  We would deliver champagne via drone to our $10,000 a night presidential suite as a PR stunt.  The antic got picked up in Fortune, Forbes, CNN and many other major media outlets. We ended up selling millions of dollars in corporate packages as a result of the stunt but that’s all it was - a stunt. Unsurprisingly, it turned out that humans were better at delivering champagne to guests than drones. Today voice, keyless and robots are great buzz for hotels to leverage in PR but the applications still need time to mature in order to deliver meaningful business impact.  Don’t get me wrong, these are nice amenities for guests and can be great ways to differentiate your hotel in the sales process but today we’re going to talk about the kind of paradigm shifting innovation that is likely to become more impactful than all of those concepts combined.  Frictionless technology experimentation and instant implementation is the single most important innovation since the internet started bringing online bookings to hotels. One only has to browse websites like Product Hunt to understand how innovative startups leverage technology to solve real business problems and scale their efforts.   There are countless apps serving startups with micro-SaaS products such as email automation, referral programs, website live chat and more.  Navigate to ‘Productivity Apps’ on Product Hunt and you’ll find more than 330,000 startups following an endless scroll of apps to solve their real world productivity problems. This is why the cost to launch (and operate) a startup has declined 20 fold in the last 10 years alone.   “Hardware? No, now you just put it on Amazon or Rackspace. Software? It’s all open-source. Distribution? It’s the App Store, it’s Facebook. Customer service? It’s Twitter — just respond to your best customers on Twitter and Get Satisfaction. Sales and marketing? It’s Google AdWords, AdSense. So the cost to build and launch a product went from five million . . . to one million . . . to five hundred thousand . . . and it’s now to fifty thousand.” ~B Lab   Fast, frictionless, intuitive and low cost technology has increased the velocity of innovation in all kinds of industries.  The ability for businesses to try and switch between products has forced creators to delight their customers or die and resulted in a digital renaissance. This single innovation is the proverbial puzzle piece that's been missing in hospitality but it’s finally here.  It’s been a game changer for forward thinking hotel companies who have improved net operating profits by leveraging new technologies to maximize unit economics.  Hotels are products just like the digital ones referred to in the quote above and technology is enabling them to operate at lower costs and distribute to wider audiences than ever before. We sat down with one of the movement’s most prominent change agents, Ulrich Pillau, co-founder of apaleo.  Uli’s vision is to facilitate a frictionless marketplace where hotels can implement micro-SaaS tech products instantaneously.  At the core of this vision is a second generation cloud property management system with rapid integration capabilities. What do IDeaS, Hetras and Fidelio all have in common?  Uli was behind all of them. With the help of his industry network Uli has put together the hotel tech dream team to build what he calls second generation cloud PMS. At first the apaleo pitch seems like a utopian promise to seasoned hoteliers:  implement your PMS in a day with no training needed and free integrations to dozens of apps. It almost sounds too good to be true but it's very real.  apaleo is already in market it’s using modern technology to bring Silicon Valley like frictionless innovation to hotels globally.     What was your background prior to starting the company? Some friends and I were part of the teams building up various worldwide software companies in the hospitality space. I spent over 10 years with Fidelio before until it was acquired by Micros and today it’s owned by Oracle. Subsequently we established with IDeaS the leading revenue management system for hotels and hotel groups. And lately we developed with hetras the first generation Cloud PMS for hotel chains (acquired by Shiji).   You have 14 co-founders at apaleo which is really unique - tell us about that. It is a very unusual story for a start-up. We had a vision for apaleo of developing the second generation of Cloud PMS which includes an App Store and open API Platform. As this is a big project we pulled together in Munich a group of 14 founders which are all top experts in their field, and a significant funding with the objective to attack the leading PMS firms within a few years.      Who was apaleo’s first customer? Our first customer was a smaller hotel group in Finland operating hotels which are entirely staffless, i.e. at hotel level there are no employees any more.  The founder was an old friend who was looking for a Cloud system to support & automate a complete mobile guest journey. He trusted us and when he saw what we were developing with apaleo, he was convinced this would become the best new PMS on the market.       Can you describe apaleo for those who may not know you yet? apaleo is a native cloud PMS which is lean and completely mobile running on any device. apaleo also offers the apaleo App Store where hotel groups & hotels can select their technology stack and pick any apps. or 3rd party software they need to operate their hotels. This is only possible because apaleo has taken an API first approach where all features and functionality are immediately available to other software which would like to integrate reducing cost for interfaces to 0.      Who is one mentor that has really helped you scale the business? apaleo in the background has a network of industry specialists which are all very relevant to our success. People on this list include the ex CIO for Hilton International, the founder & owner of an international hotel chain, the ex CEO of TravelCLICK and other top people on this level.     What's one commonly held belief that most hoteliers believe to be true that’s actually false? Hoteliers today have concerns that an implementation of a PMS or a conversion to a new PMS is a complex project that takes a long time and is very costly. This is actually false as with our native apaleo cloud PMS we are in a position to onboard a hotel very quickly at no cost.   What's the most surprising thing you've learned about scaling technology into hotels? The biggest surprise is how easily the technology & tools available today can address the scalability of platforms. We have used exactly these tools in order to make apaleo as scalable and user friendly as possible.   If you could partner with any vendor in hotel tech, who would it be and why? We accept as application on our app Store any app that is innovative and provides value & benefits to the hotel groups and hotels. apaleo will not work with any preferred partners as this is against of philosophy of an open platform where hoteliers can select their apps on top of the apaleo PMS. Our PMS users can find CRM, RMS, CRS, Channel Managers and more in the app store.  There are so many companies with great products we have run into that it would not be possible to select one or two.   Where do you see apaleo in 5-years? The founders and investors of apaleo have started the company with the vision to become the next generation PMS of choice for hotel groups and hotels. Subsequently we have plans to grow and scale the company very quickly around the world. Our technology enables this scalability. In a few years we will have thousands of properties on apaleo. Our scalability due to the underlying cloud platform and architecture is far superior to any other technology on the market. It will take some time, but there is not really a limit to what we can achieve with the apaleo store and the apaleo PMS. Our connected apps are really part of that journey and key to our success. apaleo is targeting the hotel chains worldwide so ultimately this market segment will be very big for us. However, because of the ease of activation of the apaleo PMS without implementation project even any independent can take advantage of the technology. Self onboarding through automation and no training required are the most important topics here. It is the move from a legacy PMS which is not really cloud to a new generation of platform. apaleo is fully mobile, device agnostic, easy to implement and use, and finally the hoteliers can select & connect the apps they want immediately. A PMS migration from any legacy PMS to apaleo is really easy and cost efficient relative to what hoteliers have come to expect. apaleo will never charge for configuration, set-up, training, interface fees or development just because it is not needed anymore. Implementation projects are a thing of the past regardless of what other PMS tell you. Already today we have smaller chains that take their new properties live on apaleo without even anybody from our company becoming involved. This certainly sets a benchmark for the future.   How will hotel management software change in the next 5-years? I think hotel tech is behind other verticals and does not invest as much money as needed in technology. Hoteliers take too little risk in trying out new things, but current legacy technology makes it also really difficult and expensive. In other industries people change systems every 5-7 years, in hotel industry only in 7 to sometimes 12 years.  That’s starting to change given competitive pressure on hotels to innovate. The market has moved from traditional on premise PMS and other systems to hosted systems (this is where unfortunately most of the PMS companies such as Opera or Protel are still today). That move was followed by the first generation of cloud PMS with hetras, Mews or Guestline. Today hoteliers want an entire open platform with easy to activate modules from the most innovative firms. The API first approach we have taken with apaleo for the hospitality industry is unique worldwide, and exactly addresses this requirement.   We firmly believe that the "all in one PMS" are a thing of the past. Today the hotel industry wants lean and mobile cloud PMS that is user friendly working without big projects or training. The PMS focuses on the important procedures that hotel really want to cover in this area such as reservations, pricing, inventory, distribution or payment. For all other areas there are specialised apps. which cover their fields very well, for example CRM or upselling. These apps can be easily integrated based upon the API First approach and there is no interface or certification cost any more.   Do you have any new products or feature launches we should know about? Our core products are the apaleo PMS and the apaleo App. Store, and we will focus to deliver the best open Platform as a Service for the hospitality industry. We are constantly enhancing the platform and API which has been published on our Website. We recommend to any technology company to become part of this initiative and list their app on the apaleo Store. As more apps become available on the apaleo Store, the easier it will be for hoteliers to put their own tech stack together and forget about today's world of legacy PMS.   What advice do you have for entrepreneurs looking to get into the hotel tech space? If you have a good idea, do not hesitate to making this reality. A great team of founders which are friends is key, and you should make sure you have good funding. The hospitality industry is traditionally slow in adopting new technologies, and in most cases you will need more time to grow the company than expected. Our experience has taught us to focus on one specific area and secure solid funding prior to scaling. We have seen many failures because start-ups underestimated the amount of money and time to market. MVP (Minimum Viable Product) is the most critical thing here to keep in mind.  The most important determinant of success is an excellent team of founders that sticks together even in tough times. Focus on what you really can deliver best and make your ideas reality. Aside from the team, early customers are the next most important thing - find the best lead customers you can in the early days and they will be your top promoters if the offering is strong.