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10 Best Distribution Channels

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Hoteliers voted PriceTravel Holding as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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PriceTravel

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
100 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Travel company that owns and operates online travel brands, primarily travel metasearch engines including PriceTravel.com, PriceTravel.co, Viajes.TiquetesBaratos.com, PriceAgencie...

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Hoteliers voted PriceTravel Holding as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted Expedia as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Expedia.com

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
28 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Expedia Group (NASDAQ: EXPE) is one of world's largest travel platforms. We help knock down the barriers to travel, making it easier, more enjoyable, more attainable and more acce...

Geography: Regional
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Hoteliers voted Expedia as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted Suiteness as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Suiteness

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
27 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Suiteness is a hospitality tech company that offers an online booking platform with an inventory of exclusive suites from leading hotel brands for the first time. Suites range fro...

Geography: Regional
Geography: Global Verified Customer Support: Yes No
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2021 Finalist HotelTechAwards
Hoteliers voted Suiteness as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted Agoda as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Agoda

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
26 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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From its beginnings as an e-commerce start-up based in Singapore in 2005, digital travel platform Agoda has grown to offer a global network of over 2.5 million properties in more ...

Geography: Regional
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Hoteliers voted Agoda as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted Airbnb as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Airbnb

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
25 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Founded in August of 2008 and based in San Francisco, California, Airbnb is a trusted community marketplace for people to list, discover, and book unique accommodations around the...

Geography: Regional
Geography: Global Verified Customer Support: Yes No
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Hoteliers voted Airbnb as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted Mr & Mrs Smith as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Mr and Ms Smith

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
25 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Mr & Mrs Smith is an award-winning hotel website and booking service specialising in finding the world's most inspiring boutique hotels. Founded in 2003, Smith is headquartered in...

Geography: Regional
Geography: Global Verified Customer Support: Yes No
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Hoteliers voted Mr & Mrs Smith as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted HotelTonight as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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HotelTonight

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
19 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Geography: Regional
Geography: Global Verified Customer Support: Yes No
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Hoteliers voted HotelTonight as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted Grupo Hotusa as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hotusa

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
19 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Geography: Regional
Geography: Global Verified Customer Support: Yes No
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Hoteliers voted Grupo Hotusa as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Hoteliers voted Pitchup.com as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Pitchup

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
17 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Pitchup.com is the market-leading online booking site for campsites, glamping sites and caravan parks, with over 4,500 sites available to book in 67 countries throughout Europe, t...

Geography: Regional
Geography: Global Verified Customer Support: Yes No
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Hoteliers voted Pitchup.com as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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2021 Finalist HotelTechAwards
Hoteliers voted BookingSuite as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Booking.com

HotelTech Logo score
HT SCORE
16 out of 100
Hotel Tech Score is a composite ranking comprising of key signals such as: user satisfaction, review quantity, review recency, and vendor submitted information to help buyers better understand their products.
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Booking.com is one of the world’s largest e-commerce companies, and the number one destination to book any type of accommodation. Our mission is to empower people to experience ...

Geography: Regional
Geography: Global Verified Customer Support: Yes No
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2021 Finalist HotelTechAwards
Hoteliers voted BookingSuite as the #3 Distribution Channels provider in the 2021 HotelTechAwards
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Recent Distribution Channels Articles

Why did the European Commission go after airline GDS and not hotels?

by
Hotel Tech Report
1 year ago

After the European Commission successfully prosecuted Google for its unfair search practices, travel industry pundits wondered if Google’s suite of travel products would be scrutinized next. While that hasn’t happened (yet), the commission turned its attention to another contentious topic in travel: the contracts between airlines and global distribution providers Sabre and Amadeus. Notably overlooked was the third biggest GDS, Travelport. In a press release, the commission announced an antitrust “investigation into airline ticket distribution services” which would: “investigate whether certain terms in Amadeus’ and Sabre’s agreements with airlines and travel agents may restrict the ability of airlines and travel agents to use alternative suppliers of ticket distribution services.”   The EC is investigating whether these contracts “may breach European Union competition rules which prohibit agreements between companies that prevent, restrict or distort competition within the European Union’s Single Market.”   Why airlines and not hotels? For hotels that feel squeezed by intermediaries, it may seem disheartening that the investigation doesn’t extend into other aspects of the GDS business. With hotels paying far more commissions than airlines for each booking, there’s certainly more money exchanging hands. In fact, airline distribution costs have generally fallen while hotel distribution costs remain high. In the EU, there’s a large amount of fragmentation in hospitality, which means that the average hotel has far less power at the negotiating table when it comes to the GDS. So why did the EC choose to open an antitrust investigation into airline contracts and not those with hotels? Here’s why.   Reason #1: Lufthansa’s bold move It wouldn't be a travel industry story without a little drama. This issue started back to 2015 when Lufthansa made a bold move to encourage more direct bookings: a surcharge for any bookings made via GDS. Amidst protests from GDS and agencies, the airline refused to back down. This led to a formal complaint from the European Technology and Travel Services Association (ETTSA), which languished with the EC. In July 2018, ETTSA called out the regulators for taking 30 months to respond to its initial complaint, saying that the European Commission is “tacitly giving the thumbs-up to Lufthansa’s unfair conduct, which consists of weakening the effectiveness of neutral distribution channels used by consumers to compare prices of different airlines.” Five months later, the EC announced its investigation into airline contracts with Sabre and Amadeus. While not explicitly mentioning Lufthansa, or the ETTSA’s claim of anti-competitive behavior, the commission committed to the investigation. There's been no comparable move on the hotel side of the GDS business, so there’s been no comparable investigation. If Marriott, Hilton, Accor or Intercontinental step up here it will certainly increase the odds of a shake-up in hotel GDS as well.   Reason #2: The dominance The second reason why regulators are looking at airlines versus hotels is due to the dominance of airline bookings as a share of total revenue. A look at each company’s third-quarter results shows just how dominant Sabre and Amadeus are when it comes to air bookings: Amadeus accounts for 43.4% of agency air bookings and Sabre takes 38.6%.   Sabre Q3 2018 results   The disclosure of these market share figures signal how important air is for both companies; there’s no comparative metric for lodging. At Sabre, lodging made up 11.8% of total Travel Network bookings in Q3 2018; during the same quarter at Amadeus, non-air bookings accounted for 10.7% of its GDS business.   Amadeus Q3 2018 results   Dominance matters because most business trips require airfare. Since it’s much rarer for a business trip to be hotel-only within the agencies that rely on the GDS for inventory (business trips are generally booked through GDS vs. OTA), the channels with the most comprehensive access to airline inventory will win more agency business. This dominance is also the primary reason why Lufthansa added its GDS surcharge. The airline needed to do something to pull bookings away from those channels, and a surcharge made more sense than an expensive “book direct” campaign that wouldn’t change the behavior of agencies using the GDS. In this case, even with potential legal action and agency pushback,  Lufthansa calculated that a stick works better than a carrot.   Reason #3: The lack of choice With airlines, there are fewer options for both airline and seat type. With hotels, there’s more diversity of brand, service, style, and cost. There are also far more attributes of a given hotel room than a given airline seat, which diversifies the selection for guests. The rise of mobile devices and dynamic pricing technologies shifted hotel buying behavior. Apps like HotelTonight impacted advance purchasing behavior, and services like TripBam took advantage of flexible cancellation policies. Metasearch also simplified hotel search, making it easier to compare hotels with similar attributes for both consumers and agencies. In essence, hotels and travelers are less reliant on one channel or technology for hotel bookings. Meanwhile, airlines never really had that sort of innovation, which may be why the EC decided to investigate the “full content” clauses in GDS contracts -- clauses that are not common in GDS contracts with accommodations providers.   Reason #4: The connectivity There's also been an underlying tension around the “New Distribution Capability,” or NDC. The framework, an initiative of IATA, brings more choice to the buying experience. Up to this point, ancillaries and bundled fares have not been easy to purchase via third-party channels. There’s been no industry standard that defines how airfare is distributed and displayed to agency clients via third-party channels. Travel agencies relied on a patchwork of connectivity that made it nearly impossible to book the new classes of airfare popularized by airlines, such as Basic Economy or bundles that include checked bags. This meant that consumers could have a better experience booking airfare on an airline’s website than going through an agency or metasearch channel. This disparity in consumer experience may have contributed to the EC’s investigation. Rightly so, agencies were displeased. Their business is to book travel for clients, and this patchwork made this incredibly challenging. NDC promises to streamline connectivity between agencies and airlines, which is why the GDS were generally resistant. This resistance often played out in their contracts with airlines, which limited connectivity. The GDS didn’t want to get pushed out of their cash cow business as intermediaries, and the contracts were the leverage that kept innovation at bay. Without the GDS demand, many airlines could never survive. So most airlines begrudgingly accepted the “full content” clauses that limited airlines’ abilities to revenue manage by channel. Hotels, in contrast, have maintained healthy channel control. There are more ways for hotels to limit inventory to specific channels and prices, making the marketplace more price competitive with plenty of options for consumers. No one player has as much power in lodging as the GDS do in airlines.   Reason #5: The technology Finally, how hotels connect their supply to sources of demand differs from airlines. While most airlines connect directly to the GDS, not every hotel does. For smaller to mid-size hotels, there’s at least one other layer of technology between the hotel and third-party distribution channels: the property management system, channel manager, and/or revenue management system. These tools handle connectivity, so hotels are not necessarily direct contracting with, or connecting to, the GDS. This makes contractual limitations much less impactful for hotels than airlines. Of course, hotels still have commission contracts. It’s just that hotels have more control and choice over where to distribute inventory. Hotels have more leverage thanks to less concentrated demand.   There’s also more flexibility. Many property management systems also include direct booking tools, so that inventory is managed quite seamlessly across a hotel’s website and third-party distribution. Hotels, therefore, have more granular controls to manage which rooms are offered on which channels at what price.     Looking ahead: consolidation continues None of this is saying that the relationship between hotels and the GDS is above reproach or immune to regulation. Amadeus’ recent acquisition of TravelClick for $1.5 billion recentered the hospitality technology space; Sabre’s $360 million purchase of Farelogix had a similar effect on the airline technology space. The continued expansion of the hotel and airline technology units of Sabre, Amadeus, and Travelport (recently acquired by Elliott Management) means that more consolidation is inevitable. By consolidating a larger share of technology spend, both companies risk more scrutiny on all aspects of their business -- including hotels. Since the GDS (and, by extension, agencies and OTAs) command more distribution power in hotels than airlines, hotel GDS has experienced less scrutiny from regulators. Ironically, higher fees have kept hotel GDS out of regulatory limelight. Therein lies the billion dollar question: does the scale and reach of the main GDS players reduce competition and stifle innovation?

The 3 big mistakes that revenue managers make

by
Hollie McHugh
1 year ago

The hospitality industry has become a very dynamic one in recent years. Revenue Management strategies that would have once been deemed acceptable and rational, are no longer efficient. Be a next-level Revenue Manager and avoid the three big mistakes that are commonly made with making pricing decisions.   1. Putting Quantity Over Quality Firstly, despite what many Revenue Managers think, occupancy is not the deciding factor of how profitable a hotel is and should not be their main priority. Higher occupancy will actually result in lower profits if, in order to achieve it, the ADR is dropped to a rate that is not compensated. Take this simple example- A hotel with 100 rooms sells 90 of them, at a 100 euro rate. This results in 9000 euro in revenue. The Revenue Manager then decides to set a 100% occupancy goal, selling 100 rooms at an 85 euro rate. This results in only 8500 euro in revenue. You must find the right balance between occupancy and ADR in order to achieve your highest potential profits. Furthermore, even if an ADR reduction is compensated by an increased number of bookings, don’t forget about the extra operational expenses that come with renting more rooms! So when you’re faced with a thin option between higher occupancy or higher ADR, bear this in mind before making your choice. It’s usually better to focus on ADR in properties with no extra revenue-generating departments, like restaurants, bars and spas.   2. Making Price Adjustments Based on Occupancy Making pricing decisions based on occupancy alone is a big mistake and can lead to revenue losses. An important factor to consider is the number of remaining days before arrival. For example, 70% occupancy tomorrow is very different to 70% occupancy 90 days from now. In the first case, you should lower your price to sell those remaining rooms. The second case indicates high pick up outside of the standard booking window, which should lead to increasing the room rate in order to benefit from the high demand. Another price adjustment trigger is the booking pace, which gives a better insight into room demand. Say, for example, the occupancy for the upcoming weekend is at 70% and each day for the last 7 days has seen a significant percentage of bookings for that weekend. This demonstrates a high demand, which allows for a price increase since the pickup indicates early sell out at the current price. In another situation, no reservations have been booked for the weekend during the last seven days, and the hotel received 3 cancellations yesterday, so the occupancy dropped from 73% to 70%. Although the occupancy and the number of remaining days are the same in both situations, this second scenario shows that demand is weak or the room rates are too high. Therefore, a smart Revenue Manager will make an opposite price adjustment, lowering the rates to stay competitive. This confirms that occupancy alone cannot provide enough information for effective Revenue Management decisions.   3. Pricing Based on Competition Another misconception that is still prevalent among many Revenue Managers is that they should base their prices on their competitors’ rates. Certainly, it’s important to always be aware of your competitors’ rates. However, that’s not to say that you should prioritise their prices over your hotel’s actual supply and demand. Different types of travelers are looking for different kinds of accommodations at different times. Even in the unlikely case that your competitor has identical features to your own hotel, your comp sets may not always be skilled in current Revenue Management strategies. How do you know they’re accurately following demand fluctuations and are instantly reacting to these fluctuations with optimal pricing? Your competitors might not be aware of the true demand in your area, let alone for your hotel. Therefore, by following their prices, you may sell out way too early or be left with many unsold rooms. Furthermore, your competitor may have just booked a large group reservation that resulted in an increase in price for transient business. With fewer rooms to fill, they can afford to increase their prices for those that are leftover. However, the true demand for your hotel hasn’t changed, so by following their pricing decision, you will be left with drastically diminished occupancy rates.   Conclusion So, now you know what not to do, what you should do is concentrate on increasing actual profits and focus on the real demand flow. Just by making this simple shift in thinking, you’ll be much more in line and clued in with where the hospitality industry is going these days. In turn, that will help your property be more successful!

How the New Airbnb Offerings Impact the Hotel Industry and What Hotels Brands Can Do to Win in the Sharing Economy

by
Divya Mulanjur
1 year ago

Longtime hotel industry rival, Airbnb, continues to make headlines with its latest offering. In an effort to own more vacation accommodation bookings, the company, which built its business on being the anti-hotel alternative, now offers more boutique hotel listings than ever before. But, even as Airbnb adds more hotels into the mix, hotel brands are not featured. Despite this, there is a lot that hotel brands can do to stay competitive in the sharing economy.   Why are hotel brands letting Airbnb win? Hotels have experienced strong growth since 2008, but alternative accommodations like Airbnb and HomeAway have been chipping away at their market. Phocuswright projects private accommodation bookings will grow from 12% to 16% of total bookings this year. The trouble is that the amount of pressure being felt within the hotel industry to adapt doesn’t meet the danger that faces them. This is the opening that vacation rentals are exploiting. The response to the rise in vacation rentals falls into two extremes: denial and alarm. The denialists argue that vacation rental companies like Airbnb serve a different customer -- someone hungry for local flavor and authentic experiences that can be achieved by renting an extra room in a home or apartment. However,  the majority of bookings are with hosts who offer more than one listing, essentially running unlicensed hotels [1]. Plus, travelers are predominantly looking for entire homes or apartments [2]. And, while Airbnb brags about its hosts as a major differentiator in the crowded travel accommodation marketplace, the most likely scenario is that the host and guest never meet in-person, creating an experience similar to a hotel without a front desk. The alarmists correctly point out that vacation rentals are barely regulated, taxed or scrutinized compared to hotels, similar to what the delivery industry faces from Uber and Lyft. While hotels enjoy advantages like prime locations, often more desirable than the residential properties of vacation rentals, they are often outweighed by regulatory forces. In this case, the location may be outweighed by the at least 15% price advantage of not having to pay an occupancy tax, a notable revenue stream for cities, helping them build and maintain communities around these tourist destinations. A benefit of Airbnb’s significant lobbying investments. Not only does the concept of Airbnb being a mom and pop home sharing site no longer hold true, communities are losing out on funding that directly translates into economic development.     How are hotels battling back? The hotel industry has a difficult balance to maintain. It needs to appear unruffled by vacation rentals to the public while appearing proactive to investors who are increasingly concerned about vacation rentals. The playbook so far has been focused on lobbying. We’ve gotten a glimpse into the lobbying playbook recently. The laws that have emerged have ranged from outright bans to simple tax collection. In my opinion, the bans help no one because short-term rentals do meet a real need, and by obstructing them hotels suppress innovation. There is a balance to be struck through registering and taxing short-term rentals instead of outlawing them entirely so that both consumers and the travel industry benefit. Real regulatory change is just starting to happen in places like New York and most recently in San Francisco where Airbnb had to drop 50% of its listings. Airbnb will have to add hotels to make up for its lost inventory and when that happens they will no longer have a price advantage because they are selling at the same rates as everyone else. If hotels can level the playing field and get local governments to tax and regulate vacation rentals as hotels, it will be a big win for local communities, hotels, and even consumers who will be paying more, but getting more safety in return. Hotels will know that they have fought their way out of this quagmire when they are on equal tax footing with vacation rentals. The first step is happening now with municipalities setting up laws to tax individuals. The next step is when municipalities require the sites selling short-term rentals to report the taxes that should be collected.   So what should hotels be doing to compete? Regulatory changes will take years, if not decades to come. So hotels also need to be thinking about changes they can make today to remain competitive. Focus on what it means to stay at a hotel: Location, amenities, and service. An average Airbnb host cannot compete with an established hotel in these three areas. The hotel industry as a whole should be playing up these attributes: Location: Location is consistently rated the most important factor in accommodation purchasing decisions. Most hotels have an advantage with central locations and easy access to transportation. Vacation rental maps often look like a donut around the center of the city because they are in residential neighborhoods. Amenities: While some vacation rentals may have a pool they definitely don’t have a spa. Hotels have great services like restaurants, spas, clubs onsite. We know that travelers want these amenities because of the companies that focus on getting vacation rental customers access to hotel amenities. Service: Service is one of the hotel industry’s biggest strengths. The staff that sometimes is seen as a cost center is really one of the most valuable distinguishing factors in favor of hotels. The amazing recommendation from a concierge and the attentive staff member are what travelers remember. Most Airbnb hosts don’t have the time to cater or are even in the same city as their listings. The hotel experience is the luxury experience, with an entire staff at a guest’s beck and call. Plus, issues such as broken plumbing, inoperative air conditioning, that would normally just result in getting a new room can’t be solved by hosts that don’t have the ability to move customers around. Give the people what they want. There are plenty of hotels that have a large portion of suite inventory, most of them with the ability to convert to a multi-room suite. And still, hotels continue to lose families and group vacationers to short-term whole home and apartment rentals. One big reason is that friends and families can book multi-room inventory easily on these home share platforms. They can have the shared kitchen, living room, balcony where they can be together. Even in a place like New York, 35% of Airbnb’s listings are two or more bedrooms. The truth is hotels already have the kind of inventory that can attract these customers, but most of that inventory is paid for only 30% of the time. This is because of legacy technical reasons, lack of marketing the best hotel inventory, and inter-departmental turf wars. One of the things we’ve done at Suiteness is create ways to get around these limitations thereby giving travelers exactly what they want - the space and multi-room inventory akin to an Airbnb with the safety, service and quality assurance of a hotel. Hotels are already seeing the difference that multi-room inventory makes. Two-bedroom connecting suites are booked 3.3X times more than regular suites. For the consumer, this kind of inventory means getting what they want at better prices - travelers can save up to 36%, compared to similarly sized stays elsewhere.   Where do we go from here? As an industry we need to remember that travel is about the people. Airbnb succeeded by bringing the human element back into travel, not from just “staying like a local” but by providing a space for people to stay together. Today’s travelers want to reconnect with their friends and families. The traditional hotel mindset of one-size fits all one king, two queen hotel room needs to change. Eventually, Airbnb will start adding hotel inventory to their site just like the major OTAs now include vacation rentals. The catalyst here will be when short-term rentals start getting taxed at the same rate as hotels. When that happens, what it means to be a hotel will fade away unless we do something about it. For those of us who love hotels, we won’t let that happen. Let’s get to work and adapt!   [1] AirDNA.com shows that for the month of Mar 2018, there are a significant number of hosts who manage multiple listings on Airbnb. 19% hosts in New York manage more than one listing while in Las Vegas the number is as high as 36%. In other words, these are unlicensed hotels taking customers away from traditional hotels.   [2] The popular belief that Airbnb bookings are mostly shared room or private room bookings is also not true - most are actually entire place and multi-room bookings. AirDNA.com data shows that 52% of New York listings are entire homes or apartments while Las Vegas is 68% entire home/apartment listings.     Originally published on Medium          

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Recent Distribution Channels News & Community Updates

New Research By SiteMinder Reveals Mexican Travelers Are More Enthusiastic Yet Discerning

SiteMinder
1 month ago

Mexican travelers are now considerably more enthusiastic yet discerning about travel than before the pandemic, and local accommodation providers will have to do more to meet their expectations, new research by SiteMinder, the world's largest open hotel commerce platform, shows. SiteMinder’s Changing Traveler Report 2021: Mexico Edition, based on the survey responses of more than 870 local travelers, has found that the majority of the Mexican travelling population now expects better accommodation standards than before Covid, with 40.7% expecting higher standards and 20.4% much higher. The findings reflect the greater emphasis that travelers are now placing on health and safety, as well as their desire for memorable and experience-led stays – a result of months of pent-up demand due to Covid restrictions. In fact, some 78% of Mexican holidaymakers plan to travel either more (40%) or the same (38%) compared to before the Covid-19 pandemic. Only a small minority say they will never travel again (3%) and this is down from the 5% who answered the same at this time last year. However, SiteMinder’s study also reveals that Mexican travelers are more budget-conscious than ever when deciding where to spend their next trip, with 44% of respondents listing this as one of their top two priorities when choosing where to visit. “The enthusiasm shown by Mexican travelers in this year’s Changing Traveler Report should be very encouraging for hoteliers, but it should also serve as a reminder to not get complacent during this critical time of recovery,” says Jason Lugo, Senior Regional Director for Latin America at SiteMinder. “Hoteliers need to respond to the needs of new and evolved travelers, by using technology to offer value for money with competitive rates, attractive offers and a holistic focus on the guest experience.” A focus on enhancing the experience of guests need not be hard, says Lugo, citing that over 85% of Mexican travelers are not opposed to their personal data being used to improve their visit. Additionally, direct bookings remain the most popular way of booking accommodation among Mexican travelers, with 26% favoring direct bookings over any other booking method. “Accommodation providers need to work smart, leaning on technology to optimize their communications with their guests, respond quickly to market dynamics, push the right promotions to the right customers, and free up valuable time,” says Lugo. “Mexican travelers are giving hotels permission to use their data to create these experiences. So, during this time of fewer hotel resources and heightened competition, it would be wise to capitalize on this opportunity.” SiteMinder’s World Hotel Index shows that while international visitors still make up the majority of guests in Mexico, over 35% of hotel arrivals in August are locals.

Cloudbeds Partners with Rakuten Travel Xchange to Extend Reach

Cloudbeds
2 months ago

Cloudbeds, the fastest growing hospitality management platform today, announced a partnership with Rakuten Travel Xchange, the hotel wholesale and travel technology division within the Rakuten Group. The collaboration connects Cloudbeds with Rakuten Travel, the highly ranked OTA in Japan, and 400+ B2B partners connected worldwide through API connections, travel agent portals, and websites. The unique and diverse distribution channels allow Cloudbeds to extend its reach to the extensive Rakuten Travel Xchange customer base through a single connection. In addition, Rakuten Travel Xchange adds the Cloudbeds inventory of properties that use its award-winning technology platform to manage all aspects of their business, from booking engines to payments. “We are always seeking high-value partners to complement our expanding platform, “says Anna Tsujihata, Head of Hotel Contracting and Connectivity, of Rakuten Travel Xchange. “With Cloudbeds now part of our global distribution platform, we expand our offerings to travelers seeking unique properties with superior guest experiences.” “As global travel reopens, we want our properties to be available to the largest customer base possible,” says Sebastian Leitner, VP of Partnerships for Cloudbeds. “By partnering with Rakuten Travel Xchange, a major global player and distribution channel in Japan; we significantly increase our global footprint. We are excited to partner with them.” The announcement comes as the pandemic wanes and travel demand is increasing. Since the beginning of the year, Rakuten Travel Xchange has seen bookings increase month after month, with strong demands coming from the United States and Mexico in particular. As restrictions have started to lift in other markets, travel in these geographies has followed similar trends. What is clear is that there is a large amount of pent-up demand. Rakuten Travel Xchange is seeing this demand in real-time across its global distribution network.   About Rakuten Travel Xchange Rakuten Travel Xchange is a hotel distribution service providing travel retailers around the world owned by the Rakuten Group, Inc., a global leader in Internet services. It enables accommodation partners to distribute their inventory through an extensive global distribution network that includes Rakuten Group’s branded sites, other online travel agents, wholesalers, airlines, app-only players, loyalty programs, and an assortment of offline retailers including travel agents and call center operators.

Amadeus Boosts Hospitality Accommodation Content From China Via New Partnership With Shiji

Amadeus
2 months ago

With The People’s Republic of China seeing strong domestic recovery, Shiji Group, China's leading hotel information systems player, has partnered with global travel technology company Amadeus to provide new content from Chinese hotels & chains to the Amadeus Travel Platform. This partnership will benefit an increasing number of travel agents who are looking for richer hotel accommodation options in China. This partnership will enable travel agents across Amadeus’ distribution network to access Shiji’s hotel accommodation options and provide agents with new hospitality content that is not made available yet on other global distribution systems. "Many hotels in China run on Shiji’s suite of solutions, from PMS, Channel Management, CRS, to our back-office solutions. One thing that never changes is that our hotel customers are always looking for broader, high quality distribution.” says Anson Lau, Managing Director, Shiji Distribution Solutions. "Our partnership with Amadeus will open up a whole new global hospitality distribution network to our hotel customers, empowering them to grow both their retail & corporate business globally." The Amadeus Travel Platform enables airlines, hotels, car rental companies to provide their content to the world’s largest global network of travel sellers and corporations, so that travelers can shop, and book travel the way they want. The Travel Platform is built on open systems, processing 100,000+ end-user transactions per second at peak and harnesses intelligent use of data by artificial and machine learning. End-user transactions can include anything from a low fare search to a credit card authorization request. "We are happy to be partnering with Shiji, giving the reach the company requires to make its content available to more travel agents who are looking to make bookings in China," adds Malcolm Cheong, General Manager, Hospitality, China, Amadeus. "By providing new content from Shiji’s portfolio of Chinese hotels & chains on our Travel Platform, we are enriching the content available and ensuring our travel sellers have a more robust choice of hotel accommodations to offer their customers. As the journey of rebuilding travel begins across the world, our partnership with Shiji will be delivering stress-free traveler experiences that can unlock recovery and growth." Since launch of operations in 2007, Shiji Distribution Solutions has built a diverse hospitality network that connects to 40,000+ hotel properties, including 80+ hotel chains, 2,500+ independent hotels and 200+ channels.

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