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The 9 Most Futuristic High Tech Hotels in the World

by
Hotel Tech Report
1 month ago

The pandemic accelerated technological transformation across the hospitality industry. Contactless has become a must-have, fitness centers have gone virtual, guest communications have moved to mobile, and self-service has become standard. While some hotels found themselves rapidly deploying new technologies, other hotels have been playing the tech-long game for years. Here are some of the world’s most notable high-tech hotels. We've covered the tech strategies of great hotel groups like Viceroy and Noble House who implement everything from contactless check-in to digital concierge but this article focuses on some more wacky tech implementations with a bit of focus on form over function.  This list features some pretty cool hi-tech gadgets and hotel room amenities that go above and beyond the typical flat-screen tv.  Some of the cutting-edge technology on this list may off-put more traditional travelers but will undoubtedly hit the spot for tech-savvy millennials. Rather than layer technology onto the operation, these properties embed technology into the fabric of the operation, making it a focal point and key feature. Some use it as an Instagrammable moment at a specific location while others structure their entire brand around the tech-enabled guest experience. Either way, technology is front-and-center at these hotels.   Henn Na Hotel, Japan “The Robot Hotel” Tokyo has become the marquee high-tech hotel. The brand concept is “commitment to evolution,” which appears across its operation in the form of robots. Lots of robots! The brand claims to be the world’s first hotel staffed by robots -- and there’s really no disputing that, as guests are greeted by robots at the front desk. At one property, the front desk is even staffed by dinosaur robots and iPad kiosks, which is quite the experience.     Other high-tech features at some locations include a robot barista frothing lattes, espressos and teas, as well as a 360-degree VR space for guests to immerse themselves in virtual reality experiences. The hotel is also fully enabled with Wifi powered facial recognition, which eliminates the need for a hotel key altogether. Guests can access the property, and their individual guest rooms, seamlessly using biometrics. Very futuristic, indeed!   YOTEL, New York City The YOTEL brand has been synonymous with technology since it opened its doors near  Times Square. The showstopper was a massive robot arm dominating the lobby, providing automated luggage storage for guests (as well as safety deposit boxes to store valuables). The YOBOT also provides self-service check-in, which puts the brand far ahead of today’s contactless guest experience.   The rooms -- called cabins -- may be small, but YOTEL uses technology to deliver its promise to “give you everything you need, and nothing you don’t.” This includes Smart TVs so that guests can connect their own devices and choose their own entertainment. The guest rooms also use motorized beds as space-savers and motion-activated sensors for lighting and AC to reduce carbon emissions. It’s all about efficiency, delivering an outsized guest experience in even the smallest spaces.   Blow Up Hall 5050, Poland The Blow Up Hall 50/50 is an impressive mix of form and function. Designed by BAFTA-award-winning artist Rafael Lozano-Hemmer, the hotel combines a restaurant, bar, gallery, and hotel into a unique vibe. There are several digital art installations, including a commentary on surveillance capitalism embedded right within the lobby.    The property eliminates the traditional touchstones of the hotel experience: there’s no front desk. The guest’s smartphone provides access to the property, from check-in to room keys to staff communications. The phone also acts as a room finder: after opening the app, the assigned room lights up and the door unlocks automatically. It’s these small tech flourishes that reinforce the property’s sense of mystery and intrigue.   Hotel Zetta, San Francisco At the center of Silicon Valley, the centerpiece of Hotel Zetta is most definitely its virtual reality room in the lobby. Designed by a local tech startup (naturally), the VR cube gives guests a fully-immersive opportunity to experience virtual reality. There are also Nintendo Switch consoles and Oculus VR headsets available so guests can experience next-generation technology in the comfort of their rooms.      Other tech touchstones include a vintage Atari Pong table in the Zetta Suite, which is modernized to include both the classic game and a Bluetooth speaker to play personal playlists. Each guest room is also equipped with Alexa-enabled voice control in every room. Guests can order a meal from room service, set an alarm or learn about on-property dining specials.    Kameha Grand, Zurich The Kameha Grand isn’t one of those kitschy places that you’re embarrassed to stay at. Quite the opposite: the high-end “lifestyle hotel” is part of Marriott’s Autograph collection. And, with rooms designed by Marcel Wenders, it’s got all of the trappings of a luxury property. Rooms     Our favorite rooms are, of course, the Space Suites. It’s the most futuristic room type on this list because it quite literally connects to space. The in-room TV features a live feed from NASA TV so that you can fuel those space dreams. The atmospheric vibes will contribute to that dreamy feel, with “outer space furnishings have been designed down to the smallest detail with a floating bed, pictures of galaxies, hovering astronauts and models of rockets.” Far out!   Virgin Hotels  The Virgin Hotel brand has always been tech-forward and guest-centric. Even prior to the pandemic, the brand empowered guests to control their own experiences right from the palm of their hand. Now, those features are dramatically expanded to be even more contactless.     Named Lucy, the app allows guests to skip check-in, using their phone to select rooms and unlock doors. Guests can also use the app to order room service, adjust room temperature, control entertainment (in-room streaming and Apple Music), plan their trip around the city, or even follow custom exercise routines by Fitbod. Following on smartly with its brand promise, the app also offers three preset lighting modes for guestrooms:  Get Lit for full brightness, Get in the Mood for dimmed relaxation, and Do Not Disturb for sleep. By putting all of these elements together into a single interface, Virgin Hotels puts the guest in control.    25hours Hotels Another brand that’s focused on high-tech without losing high-touch hospitality is 25hours. Thanks to an in-house multidisciplinary think tank, the Extra Hour Lab, the brand experiments with new ways of engaging with guests, both through digital and analog channels. That balance plays out in Cologne, where the record store greets guests alongside    Perhaps that’s one aspect that distinguishes the futuristic, high-tech hotels: those that understand how to inject storytelling into the experience alongside the latest technology.   Cityhub A hybrid between a comfortable hotel and a convivial hostel, Cityhub is futuristic in both its technology and its approach to hospitality. It’s part of a new wave of brands that blend categories and use technology to enable a more social experience. The Cityhub brand has an app but it also takes a cue from Disney and offers RFID wristbands. These bands are used not only for check-in and property access, but also  at the bar, cafe or vending machines, where guests can serve themselves and charge their rooms. Without having to constantly pull out their phones, there’s a more personal element to the experience.     Each “hub” has its own customizable lighting, temperature and audio streaming, so guests can control their vibe. There’s also an on-property social network, giving guests a digital lobby to meet and plan real-world adventures.   The Atari Hotel, Las Vegas (coming soon!) A notable mention is the upcoming Atari Hotel in Las Vegas.  This property will blur the boundaries between hotel and immersive experience, building on Las Vegas’ long history of blending entertainment with hospitality. The experience is straight out of Blade Runner: bright lights, massive marquees, and an “everywhere you look” focus on gaming.    The Atari Hotel points to a far-more futuristic vision of hotels than anything else on the market today. It very well could be the first hospitality experience built just as much for the virtual world as for the physical one. Guests can host friends in their rooms for gaming marathons, with consoles, batteries, and spare controllers available for delivery. The Atari Hotel may redefine the category and establish a new mainstream travel trend: the gamer circuit. -- What are your favorite high-tech hotel amenities? Let us know if we missed any key ones like hotels with crazy underwater speakers, air conditioning activated by motion sensors, cool touchscreen applications, and more!

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100 Best Skills to Include on a Resume (With Examples)

by
Hotel Tech Report
2 months ago

Revising your resume or crafting a cover letter? Our list of 100+ best skills to include on a resume will help your application stand out to recruiters and hiring managers. The economy is moving quickly, so we compiled this list to highlight the most in-demand skills for today’s job market. We’ve organized the list by skill category so you can easily find the section most relevant to you: Communication and listening skills Customer service skills Interpersonal skills Technical and computer skills Leadership and management skills Communication and listening skills Hospitality industry employees can take advantage of constant opportunities to practice their communication and listening skills with guests, colleagues, and managers. And communication skills are some of the most in-demand skills for all industries, even outside of hospitality. Verbal communication: What did you say? Verbal communication isn’t just about talking, but clearly articulating the point you want to convey. Best practices when communicating verbally include avoiding filler words and jargon and using a strong, clear voice. In a hotel environment, front desk agents use verbal communication when checking guests in. Good verbal communication skills are especially important because these verbal interactions can make or break the guest experience. Written communication: Like verbal communication, the goal of written communication is to clearly communicate to an audience - but this time, the audience is reading your words instead of hearing them. You can practice written communication through writing emails, signage, memos, menus, reports, and more.  Phone skills: “Thank you for calling the Four Seasons New York, how can I assist you today?” If you’ve ever worked in a guest-facing role at a hotel or restaurant (or even a retail store), chances are you’ve answered a few phone calls! Good phone skills include speaking at an appropriate volume, being conscious of pauses, multi-tasking (pulling up the guest’s profile while holding a conversion, for example), and adjusting your tone to match that of the caller. When including “phone skills” on your resume, remember to quantify the number of calls you fielded. Remote communication: In the post-COVID business world, remote communication has become increasingly popular with many people working from home or in a socially distanced environment. If you’re a good remote communicator, you can keep your audience engaged over a video call, convey your message in a variety of formats (like sending your key points in an email and explaining them over a video call), and maintain rapport with clients or colleagues even if you aren’t sitting together in the same physical office. Public speaking: Mic check, 1, 2, 3… Public speaking is an essential skill for many roles that interface with guests, clients, or colleagues. Perhaps you’ve hosted an event, led a training session, or presented a business case to executives - these are all good examples of public speaking experience.  Constructive criticism: If you can provide constructive criticism in a strategic, polite way, your colleagues or clients will be more receptive to it. For instance, if you are training new front desk agents and your trainee isn’t speaking clearly enough, your constructive advice will help him deliver a better guest experience. Active listening: Communication isn’t only about sharing information with others, it’s also about listening. Active listening includes using body language and eye contact to show your focus on the speaker, like when you hold eye contact with a restaurant patron and orient your body to face them while they’re speaking. Asking questions: Another component of active listening is asking good questions - both to show your engagement and to probe for information you need. For instance, if you’re taking a reservation from a guest over the phone, asking targeted questions about the purpose of the guest’s trip or the type of room she wants can help you better meet the guest’s needs. Note-taking: It might seem simple, but note-taking is an extremely helpful and important skill, especially for roles that involve teamwork or interaction with clients or customers. You can hone your note-taking skills by taking notes during meetings or phone conversions. Nonverbal communication: The words that you speak are just part of your communication skills; nonverbal communication, or body language, can tell your audience just as much (or more!) about your message. Nonverbal communication involves your facial expression (like whether you’re smiling or not), body position, posture, hand gestures, and eye contact.  Bilingual or other language skills: Do you speak another language? Language skills are more and more in-demand as the world becomes more globalized. When including language skills on your resume, remember to include your level of fluency, certifications, or professional context (for example, if you spoke Spanish with your housekeeping employees as a housekeeping manager). Communication software: In today’s high-tech world, you need to have a solid grasp of communication software in addition to speaking, writing, and listening skills. If you’ve used communication software like Slack, Zoom, Skype, or others, you can highlight your expertise by noting it on your resume.  Customer service skills As the saying goes, you want to “know your customer,” but to be a good customer service professional, you need to master customer service skills first.  Emotional intelligence: Perhaps the customer service-related skill that is most transferable to other types of jobs is emotional intelligence. If you have high emotional intelligence, you can manage and control your own emotions and handle relationships with colleagues or clients with ease. For example, if you are in a stressful situation like a busy day of check-ins, emotional intelligence helps you stay calm and recognize if and when guests are getting upset so you can act accordingly. Problem solving: Like emotional intelligence, problem solving is another skill that is very in-demand no matter which industry you want to work in. If you’ve worked in a hospitality context, you probably have a slew of examples you can mention in interviews, like how you managed to deliver a good experience for a guest who booked the wrong room type or how you figured out a solution for restaurant patrons who showed up on a night that was fully booked. Conflict resolution: Similar to problem solving, resolving conflicts is another essential customer service skill. Conflicts are stressful, so your expertise in resolving them shows you can stay calm under pressure, remain objective, and avoid placing blame.  De-escalating skills: Have you ever needed to calm down a guest who was screaming, yelling, and making a scene in the lobby? If so, you can speak to your de-escalating skills, which would make you an asset to any organization that interfaces with the occasional difficult customer. Crisis management: In hotel and restaurant jobs, crises are bound to happen every once in a while. Any example from your own work experience can help you illustrate how you stayed calm and responsible during unexpected, serious events like medical emergencies. Sales skills: As a customer service professional, even if “sales” isn’t technically part of your role, you’re always selling your product or brand to your customers. As a front desk agent, for example, the experience you provide to your guests will influence them to choose your hotel again - or not.  Product knowledge: Customer service professionals are often the face of the business, since they’re usually the first ones to interact with customers. If you have strong product knowledge skills, you’re a fast learner and can become well acquainted with the product to answer customer questions or else direct customers to the correct department. Upselling: In some customer service roles, upselling is an opportunity to further flex your sales skills, make an impact on the business’s bottom line, and build stronger relationships with customers. As a hotel reservations agent, for example, you might include on your resume that you secured $50,000 in upsell revenue or increased the average reservation revenue by 8%. Negotiation: A component of any role that involves working with multiple parties is negotiation, which involves a combination of communication, listening, and sales skills. Negotiation examples are common in a sales context, like negotiating contracts for group room blocks, but also in situations like finding a solution for a guest who isn’t happy with their room or a diner who doesn’t like their meal. Persuasion: A key to influencing your guests or clients to accept your desired outcome is persuasion - but not in a manipulating way! If you’ve mastered persuasion, you can guide your client toward giving the OK by illustrating how your solution meets their needs so that when they agree, they feel totally satisfied with the outcome. Attention to detail: Customer service interactions are packed with little details from the correct spelling of the customer’s name to specific needs like allergies or birthday surprises. Attention to detail helps you ensure that no aspect of experience gets overlooked. Multitasking: In a customer service role, you’ll likely need to multitask, whether by taking notes during calls or operating multiple software apps at once. Demonstrating your multitasking skills shows that you’ll be ready to jump in from day one. Relationship building: Building rapport with guests or customers is a powerful way to deliver great customer service experiences. Engaging in small talk with customers or remembering a repeat guest’s name are simple but effective ways to build relationships and develop brand loyalty. Enthusiasm: Companies want their customer professionals to be excited about the product of service - if the employees aren’t jazzed up about what they’re selling, why would customers want to buy? Showing your enthusiastic personality is a great way to stand out. Confidence: Like enthusiasm, your confidence helps customers feel good about their customer service interaction. Confidence also helps you take risks, try new things, and flex your leadership skills. Business etiquette: Though at times manners might seem like a lost art in the 21st century, they’re still very important in customer service. Using simple words like “please” and “thank you” set you apart as a customer service professional who cares about conveying a good company image. Service orientation: You can learn many components of a customer service role, like information about the product, but it’s a lot harder to teach people to have a service-oriented attitude. If you have a service orientation, you aim to please and exceed customers’ expectations. Interpersonal skills In just about every job, you’ll need to work with other people on a regular basis, so interpersonal skills are essential to a successful career.  Teamwork: Working successfully with colleagues is a must for most roles in and out of the hospitality industry, so hiring managers are always looking for examples of how you’ve been a good team player.  Cross-functional collaboration: Besides working with your direct colleagues, you may need to work closely with people in other departments. Showing experience of cross-functional collaboration, like if you’ve been a housekeeping manager working closely with the maintenance department, is always a plus. Decision making: Your resume is not the place to mention analysis paralysis! Every role will require decision making, so hiring managers want to see that you can carefully weigh your options and come to the right conclusion. Organization: In order to work with colleagues or customers, you need to have your own responsibilities organized first. Organizational skills include time management, note-taking, punctuality, and more. Responsibility: As you progress in your career, you’ll be trusted with increasing levels of responsibility. You’ll stand out among applicants if you can demonstrate that you’re responsible, like if you’ve owned up to a mistake or stayed late to complete a task you promised to finish. Punctuality: Nobody wants to work with someone who’s chronically late; punctuality is a fantastic way to show you value your colleagues’ or clients’ time. When you’re interviewing for a new role, make sure to show up on time for the interview! Dependability: In any team-oriented role, your team needs to know they can rely on you to show up and work hard. Dependability is crucial to being a good team player; for example, if you’ve never forgotten to show up to a shift, you can include “dependable” on your resume.  Flexibility: Even the best laid plans can fall through, and being flexible is an important quality for any role. For instance, you might need to cover a team member’s tasks if they get sick unexpectedly. Creativity: Do you like to think outside of the box? Creativity doesn’t just mean being artistic; creative thinking helps you come up with new solutions to problems or try initiatives to bring the business to the next level.  Adaptability: Like flexibility, adaptability means you’re comfortable with change, but if you’re adaptable, you can easily shift to a new way of doing things. For instance, a shift to a remote work environment requires significant adaptability! Patience: If you’ve worked in any guest- or customer-facing role, then you know patience is crucial to your success. You can practice being patient by remaining calm and positive when things don’t move as quickly as you’d like - like traffic, slow WiFi, or even those last couple restaurant patrons who linger for hours. Confidentiality: In a hospitality context, you’re often trusted with sensitive information. Confidentiality means you can not only keep a secret, but also determine which information must be treated with extra care. Communication: Among the most important interpersonal skills is communication; without good communication skills, it’s nearly impossible to work well with others! Communication skills include written, verbal, and nonverbal elements, plus skills like active listening and public speaking. Teaching or training skills: Roles with more responsibility often include a training or teaching component, such as training new front desk agents. If you’ve had any sort of teaching experience, be sure to include on your resume the context and the number of people you trained. Collaboration: In many jobs, you’ll need to collaborate with others on a project, an event, or something similar. Collaboration involves dividing responsibility, holding each other accountable, and completing one integrated product. Networking: It might be painful at first, but networking is an extremely useful skill - it might even help you land your next job! A good networker knows what they want to gain from each interaction, has an elevator pitch prepared, sends follow-ups, and stays in touch with connections. Technical and computer skills Many jobs require not only soft skills like communication and customer service skills, but also specific technical skills. Showing your technical or computer expertise on your resume will help you be a more competitive applicant. Microsoft Office: As one of the most popular software suites in the business world, Microsoft Office experience is often requested on job descriptions. Microsoft Office expertise usually includes Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Outlook. You may have used Microsoft PowerPoint to put training presentations together or Excel to analyze financial data. G-Suite: Like Microsoft Office, the Google suite of apps is a popular one in many industries. Since G-Suite apps are designed for cloud-based collaboration, remote companies or jobs that involve a lot of teamwork might prefer G-Suite experience over Microsoft Office. G-Suite includes Google Docs, Sheets, Slides, Forms, and more.  Email management: How many unread emails are in your inbox? Email management skills can involve not only just reading and sorting emails, but also managing a shared inbox and composing emails for optimum readability. Spreadsheets: If you see life in columns and rows, then your spreadsheet skills are worthy of inclusion on your resume. You may want to mention specific and relevant details about your spreadsheet expertise, like in which context you used them and the types of formulas you mastered. Data analysis: Analytical experience can vary by industry and type of role, so if you’ve had any relevant experience, it’s important to clearly describe what you did with as much quantification as possible. For example, maybe you used Excel to analyze the cost and revenue projections to decide whether or not to purchase a new airport shuttle bus for your hotel. Database management: As more business work to wrangle big data, database management can be an attractive skill. If you’ve had experience with data validation or writing reports or queries, don’t forget to include that experience on your resume. Programming languages: If you’re applying for programming roles, then mentioning your handle of programming languages, like Python or Java, is crucial. If you’re currently learning a programming language, you can mention that too, though be honest about your level of expertise. Web design: Simply including “web design” on your resume isn’t enough; hiring managers want to see concrete examples of websites, apps, or software that you’ve built. Include key details like the number of app downloads or monthly website visits. Website building: Even if you don’t know how to code, you might have built websites before! Experience using content management systems or website builders is still worthy of a mention, and be sure to quantify your experience in terms of number of websites built or number of website visitors. Adobe Photoshop/InDesign: Similar to listing your expertise in G-Suite or programming languages, mentioning your experience with Adobe’s suite of software can also show your preparedness for a role in design-related fields. Systems administration: Another valuable IT-related skill is systems administration, which involves being the manager and subject matter expert for a software application or system within an organization. For instance, if you were the administrator for your hotel’s property management system. Troubleshooting: In any tech-oriented role, you’ll need to know how to troubleshoot effectively. You can demonstrate your troubleshooting skills by approaching a problem systematically and identifying issues and solutions. Expertise in specific software applications: As a hotel or restaurant employee, you may have had experience with specific systems, like HotSOS or SynXis, for example. Noting your expertise on applications for relevant roles will help you stand out among applicants who have never used those systems. Marketing skills Looking for a new marketing role? You may want to include these skills on your resume or develop them to become a more competitive candidate. Search engine optimization: Do you know how to do keyword research or write a good meta description? SEO is a great skill to include on your resume when applying to marketing roles. Remember to mention any relevant statistics from SEO responsibilities you’ve had in the past.  Search engine marketing: In addition to optimizing your performance in search results, you may also have had experience with paid SEM, like Google Ads. Be sure to include your budget, return on ad spend, or any other relevant stats. Pay-per-click marketing: Like SEM and SEO, experience with PPC marketing can help you stand out among candidates for digital marketing roles. For example, if you’ve used Expedia TravelAds or Tripadvisor Sponsored Campaigns in a hotel context, your experience can make you an attractive applicant for other digital marketing jobs. Email marketing: As more and more business shifts online, email marketing is a powerful way to keep in touch with customers. Showing your expertise with email marketing tools like Mailchimp and Constant Contact is especially relevant today. Content management systems: Some marketing roles look for candidates with experience using content management systems such as Wordpress or Contentful. Remember to note your level of expertise and the specific system you’ve used. A/B testing: A savvy marketer will test two strategies to see which one performs better. Examples of A/B testing to include on your resume could include experimenting with subject lines in an email newsletter or uploading different featured photos on your restaurant website. Customer relationship management: Every business wants to generate more repeat business, so CRM is an attractive skill for marketing roles. If you have CRM experience, also include the system you’ve used, like Salesforce. Social media: Do you know how to leverage tweets, pins, and posts in a business context? Show off your social media skills by including engagement statistics and follower growth on your resume.  Branding: If you’ve started a business from scratch or worked in a start-up, you might have experience creating a brand, like selecting a name, logo, color scheme, and voice. Hiring managers looking for branding experience might want to see a portfolio of examples of your work. Sales and financial skills Skills in the sales and finance sectors are often transferable to other industries. For example, if you’ve worked as a sales manager at a hotel, you could be a competitive applicant to a sales position at a software or retail company. Lead generation: How can you sell something if you have no leads? Lead generation is one of the first steps in the sales process, and it involves scraping databases or the internet for potential customers, like gathering a list of contact info for all nearby restaurants for outreach about your new restaurant POS app. Lead qualification: After generating leads, you need to sort out the leads that have high potential. Lead qualification is another skill hiring managers will look for to show that you use strategy in the sales process. Prospecting: Once you have your leads list, the prospecting process involves regularly communicating with your leads to ensure your product is always top of mind, even if they aren’t ready to commit. Contracting: Ready to seal the deal? Contracting typically involves negotiation and attention to detail, though today’s contracts are most likely signed via digital apps like DocuSign instead of an old school pen and paper. Event planning: Whether you’ve planned small company gatherings or red-carpet galas, event planning is an attractive skill to include on your resume. Make sure to mention how many events you’ve planned and the number of attendees - and you get bonus points if you’ve planned virtual events on digital platforms! Revenue management: Selling the right room at the right price to the right customer is the goal of hotel revenue managers, so demonstrating your success through RevPAR increases or direct share growth is a good best practice when applying for revenue management roles. If you’ve had any experience using revenue management systems such as IDeAS, be sure to note that as well. Central reservations systems: Hotels, tour operators, event venues, and more often use central reservation systems to organize their bookings and client information. When experience using a CRS is relevant, don’t forget to mention the specific system you’ve used. Online travel agencies: Do you know the ins and outs of OTA extranets? When applying for marketing or revenue management roles at hotels or short-term rental companies, mentioning your OTA experience can give you a leg up compared to someone brand new to the industry. Point of sale systems: If you have experience in a retail or hospitality context, you may have had experience using POS software, which can be relevant to include on your resume when applying to similar positions. Cash handling: Although many businesses are becoming cashless, showing your cash handling experience can show that you’re a responsible, trustworthy employee. Accounting: Depending on your accounting experience, you may want to include accounting skills on your resume, which could involve accounting software (such as QuickBooks), familiarity with local regulations, attention to detail, and analytical skills. Profit and loss statements: Perhaps your accounting experience includes creating or analyzing P&L statements, like if you’ve prepared P&Ls for hotel owners and executives.  Financial modelling: Along with analyzing actualized financial numbers, if you’ve done any financial modelling or forecasting, these experiences are also relevant when applying to finance roles. Be sure to note your level of proficiency in Excel or other database software. Cost management: Your application to any finance role can also include your experience with cost management, whether that includes familiarity with direct or indirect costs, math skills, or financial software. PCI compliance: Any handling of sensitive data like credit card numbers must comply with industry standards, and your resume should reflect your knowledge of those guidelines. As a front desk agent, for example, you may have completed PCI compliance training or a course about similar standards, which can be an asset to your resume.  Leadership and management skills As you continue along your career path, you might work up to leadership positions. But holding a “manager” role doesn’t automatically mean you’re an effective leader; these leadership and management skills will help you earn respect from your direct reports and deliver the results you want. Mentorship: Even if you haven’t held a formal management role yet, you can still demonstrate your leadership skills through informal mentorship programs, volunteer activities, or professional relationships that have a mentorship component. Team building: As a leader in an organization, you’ll be expected to build and maintain a cohesive team. Your resume should mention your team building skills, such as examples like increasing employee satisfaction scores or leading team events. Team communication: Besides standard verbal and written communication skills, a great leader should have experience communicating with a large team audience. Perhaps you’ve led weekly meetings for your department or sent memos to all employees at your company. Presentation skills: Communicating with a large internal or external audience might include presentations, and if you have notable presentation experience, it’s worth a mention on your resume. Note the setting and audience of your presentations, such as quarterly business review presentations with the executive team and hotel owners. Meeting facilitation: Besides leading presentations, managers often lead meetings with employees, colleagues, and other internal or external stakeholders. Demonstrating your ability to keep meetings organized, on track, and productive is a great way to prove your management skills. Time management: As a manager, you’ll have constant demands on your time. Time management is crucial to success, and even if it’s not the most buzz-worthy skill, it’s one that can mean the difference between a good and a great manager. Set limits on the number of meetings per day, schedule deep work blocks, and make sure to take time away from work to recharge. Project management: When leading initiatives, managers are often responsible for keeping the project on track. Project management skills include planning each step of the project, assigning responsibilities to each team member, scheduling regular follow-ups, and securing resources. Organizational planning: Especially in small companies or start-ups, managers are responsible for building teams and hiring new employees. A much-needed skill is organizational planning, which includes identifying skills or competencies that a new role can fill on your team. Interviewing: A key step in the hiring process is interviewing, and solid interview skills are essential to success as a hiring manager. On your resume, you can mention how many employees you’ve hired and what their retention rate is. Performance tracking: Employees need regular feedback to continue delivering excellent work, and managers must manage performance through regular check-ins and performance reviews. For example, sales managers might have bi-weekly meetings with the Director of Sales, who helps each sales manager stay on track toward their quarterly goals. Task delegation: Although it can be difficult to relinquish control of projects at first, delegation is a crucial skill for managers to use their time most effectively. As a Director of Rooms, for instance, you might set a goal to increase guest review scores but leave your Front Office Manager in charge of launching an initiative to achieve it. Prioritization: Along with delegating tasks, a good manager can prioritize between the most important tasks and the ones that are less urgent. For example, a restaurant manager might prioritize hiring additional staff leading up to the busy summer season over a fun but less urgent menu redesign project. Scheduling: In industries like hospitality and retail, managers are often responsible for setting their employees’ schedules. A great manager will treat employees fairly and equally when handling time-off requests and shift preferences. Managing cross-functional teams: Managers may also have the opportunity to oversee employees with different work functions and expertise. These cross-functional relationships require the manager to flex her skills to work best with each employee. Risk-taking: Any business endeavor includes at least some degree of risk, like when deciding to try a new idea or even hire a new employee. Managers aren’t afraid to take calculated risks and they know how to evaluate situations to minimize possible consequences. Budgeting: Many leadership roles oversee not only employees, but also budgets. On your resume, you can highlight your budgeting experience by mentioning the size of your annual budget or by how much you decreased operating costs, for example. Forecasting: If you’ve studied historical data to predict what may happen in the future, then you’ve started to build forecasting skills. If you have forecasting experience, you should include the context and the impact of your predictions on the business. Industry certifications: Have you earned any hospitality (or other) industry certifications, such as CRME or CHIA? These certifications add credibility to your resume and set you apart as an expert in your field. Did we miss any key skills to include on a resume? Let us know!

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The 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech 2021

by
Hotel Tech Report
3 months ago

Each year Hotel Tech Report surveys thousands of industry insiders to find the best hotel tech jobs and employers globally. In 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic wreaked havoc on the hotel industry.  The World Travel and Tourism Council predicts that 121 million of the 330 million jobs tied to tourism around the world will be lost in 2020.  Despite existential challenges, hotels and their vendors have proven resilient in the face of the biggest challenge ever posed to the hospitality industry by working together. But there’s always opportunity in crisis.  The pandemic has advanced digitization in the global economy by at least 5 years according to most experts.  Hotels that already had adopted technology like contactless check-in and guest messaging software have had a massive advantage since the pandemic broke out and the importance of technology for running a successful hotel business will continue to rise over the coming years meaning that demand for hotel technology talent will grow with it. Here at Hotel Tech Report, we’ve interviewed countless hoteliers about their journeys from being hoteliers into lucrative technology careers like Del Ross, Marco Benvenuti, Sameer Umar, and Kevin Brown. For hoteliers furloughed on the sidelines, there is an unprecedented opportunity to pivot into a technology career leveraging skills and knowledge from hospitality experience.   But which hotel tech companies should you apply to? Every year we do the hard work for you and survey thousands of hotel tech professionals to find the best companies to work for in the hospitality industry. We ask respondents to rate their employers from 1-10 on these key variables:  Work-life balance Personal development opportunities Gender equality Confidence in company direction Values alignment 2021 Bonus Question: Rate your firm’s COVD-19 crisis response Hotel Tech Report creates this list each year for two reasons: (1) to help industry professionals find the best hospitality tech jobs and (2) to help hotel tech buyers understand that it’s just as important to partner with great organizations as it is to find great software tools and products. Vendor culture is important to every aspect of a vendor relationship: Product: Great workplaces attract the best talent who make the best products Customer Support: Happy client reps give better service and stay around longer developing deeper relationships. Sales: When a sales team has high turnover, innovation gets strangled because there isn’t enough cash coming in the door to invest in innovation. Our 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech list features companies who foster wonderful work environments for employees.  In return, those employees deliver incredible products and services to clients. Without further adieu here are 2021’s 10 Best Places to Work in Hotel Tech…     10. Siteminder (TIE) Right before the coronavirus pandemic broke out, industry leader Siteminder reached an incredible milestone earning itself unicorn status.  Under the stewardship of CEO Sankar Narayan the firm quickly composed itself when the pandemic broke out and began rolling out initiatives to support both employees and customers like its World Hotel Index sharing real-time data with the industry when historical data just wouldn’t cut it.  Siteminder has an internal slack channel called #stayingsocial dedicated strictly to team members having a social communal space in the age of remote work.  This is pretty typical for a small startup but much rarer in the world of 700 employee behemoths.  The great part about working at a large startup-like Siteminder is that there’s almost limitless upward mobility according to one employee working in operations at the firm, “They allow me opportunities to take on more responsibilities that are even beyond my scope to develop my skills and prep me up for bigger roles. They also give leadership training to enhance to continue developing my capabilities.”  If you’re looking for a fast-paced global startup on a world domination path - then you should absolutely be dropping a resume at Siteminder.  The best part is that they’ve got offices all around the world so even if you prefer the WFH life your colleagues shouldn’t be too far away no matter where you call home.     10. Atomize (TIE) This is Atomize’s first time making Hotel Tech Report’s annual Best Places to Work list but we doubt it will be their last.  In true Swedish fashion Atomize rates amongst the highest on the list for gender equality with a 50% ratio of men to women on its leadership team.  Atomize also rates very highly for culture alignment with a score of 97.8%.  Perhaps the biggest standout for Atomize was how highly employees rated the firm’s COVID-19 response and support for clients during a crisis.  “Everyone from finance to product development has chipped in to try to support clients. We have for instance developed a relief-program for those that are hurting really bad, we have updated the product to amend for the large drop in occupancy for hotels, etc,” one Atomize executive told Hotel Tech Report.  Atomize made it through COVID-19 without a single layoff which is a testament to the longevity of the business and its and commitment to team members.  During the crisis Atomize stayed calm, launched the 2.0 version of their core RMS product, and even found time to bring the team together for a BBQ this summer during a slow down in transmission rates.     9. Hotel Effectiveness Georgia (the U.S. state not the country) based Hotel Effectiveness is in the business of helping hotel owners more efficiently manage labor but the question is: how well do they manage their own labor? It turns out they do a pretty darned good job at fostering internal culture.  Prior to the pandemic labor costs were the biggest focus area for most hotel ownership and management groups - despite the shift in focus Hotel Effectiveness managed to grow through the pandemic all while placing a heavy emphasis on quality of life for employees.  Team members cite a high percentage of employees being groomed from junior roles into leadership positions, flexible PTO programs, and strong opportunities for women.  PTO is great but Hotel Effectiveness management goes one step further where they encourage team members to completely unplug and not even check email during their vacation.  Adding icing to the cake, employees raved about the firm’s response to COVID-19 where it was able to grow without any layoffs needed.  One engineer raved about the Company’s COVID-19 response, “Hotel Effectiveness immediately shifted priorities specifically to address the changing needs of our clients. Hotel Effectiveness provided new guidance materials, payment options, and built new features (such as Daily Wellness Check-In) under tight deadlines to meet the new needs of our customers.”     8. EasyWay Big congrats to the first-ever Israeli startup to make this list!  If you’ve ever been to Tel Aviv or the Start-up Nation (Israel), perhaps a job interview with EasyWay is the excuse you needed to visit one of the most amazing cities in the world packed with beautiful beaches, vibrant nightlife, and a foodie scene that’s truly in a league of its own.  EasyWay is the quintessential startup with a mentality that so long as you hit your KPIs - the rest of your life is totally flexible.  An EasyWay executive’s quote to Hotel Tech Report about the last 12-months at the company says it all, “The work around the clock in the COVID-19 time was crazy.  We have developed so much stuff, that I almost miss this period. We've learned a lot from that, and staid on our feet! The rest of the team was great and it really gave me confidence in my own abilities.  If you're the kind of person who likes to work hard and play hard - you’d be wise to check out EasyWay’s open positions.      7. Asksuite This is Asksuite’s second year making the list and true to their commercial team’s motto “rockets don’t have reverse”, even a pandemic couldn’t slow down this high flying Brazilian startup.  Florianopolis may not be a hotel tech hub (yet) but the Asksuite team has access to lessons in language, hospitality and other training to upskill their way into global domination.  During the pandemic, leaders have made themselves available for 1:1 meetings to support all colleagues and perhaps it’s this close communication that leads Asksuite employees to rate 98% confidence in the future success of the firm.  Asksuite employees frequently cite an onboarding process that makes all team members feel like a part of the family in short order.     6. RoomRaccoon Despite the pandemic RoomRaccoon doubled the firm’s headcount in 2020 and achieved a major milestone in reaching 1,000 clients.  Employees frequently cite similar aspects of the culture as differentiators like their annual international week at the Netherlands headquarters and an inclusive onboarding program.  One employee within the marketing department told Hotel Tech Report, “This year RoomRaccoon decided to start hiring more new colleagues against the market trend of furlough and letting people go. To smoothen the onboarding process of our new hires we've created an E-learning program and two intensive onboarding weeks. So far we've onboarded 15 new hires since July 2020 that immediately are getting results. Something I'm really proud of!”  If you’re looking for an ambitious organization with a strong remote culture and complementary annual trips to the Netherlands - don’t hesitate and check out open listings at RoomRaccoon.     5. Alliants The Alliants story is the cure to the common venture funded business gone wrong story.  Alliants built the business developing custom software for ultra luxury hotel brands like Four Season and Jumeirah before ever dipping their toes into the SaaS world.  That means they’ve got killer products, an eye for design and engineering to back it up.  Starting in a consultative role for luxury brands has afforded Alliants a luxury not many early stage SaaS products have - cash flow.  How would this impact you when you apply for a role there?  Alliants employees are given a $5,000 stipend to invest in their own education and training.  Whether it’s a paid marketing course or intro to Ruby on Rails - at Alliants you will be able to create your own journey and take control of your destiny.  Have you ever had a boss block your calendar so people can’t book meetings with you? Well, Alliants employees have.  During winter months with less daylight, CEO Tristan Gadsby blocked the entire team’s calendars from 11:30am - 1:30pm to encourage team members to get outside, walk or simply catch some rays.  If that doesn’t sell you I don’t know what will.     4. ALICE This ain’t ALICE’s first rodeo, well it’s their fourth if we want to be precise about it.  ALICE has made Hotel Tech Report’s Best Places to Work list 4 years in a row (2018, 2019, 2020, 2021).  ALICE is an incredible place to work for former hoteliers because employees truly act as a strategic extension of their partner properties.  During the pandemic, ALICE quickly pivoted to rollout closure checklists and other free assets to help partners quickly reconfigure their operations for the new normal.  “The most memorable achievement while working at ALICE this past year was being able to provide support for our employees during the pandemic. The pandemic-related fatigue and anxiety impacted everyone and in different ways. We were able to provide support to our employees through group therapy sessions, health and wellness initiatives, increased one-on-one check-ins regarding fatigue, increased opportunities for learning and connection with one another virtually. I am so proud of how the leadership at ALICE has led us through the most difficult time in our industry's history, and with such care for both our customers, our industry as a whole, and our employees,” says one ALICE team member in an HR role.  Just as important as supporting clients through COVID-19 is supporting colleagues.  ALICE team members were constantly comforted that management understood the stress and challenges they were facing during this historic yet tragic year, encouraging an environment of transparency and honesty about how to cope with natural distractions from work in times of stress.     3. hotelkit Austria-based hotelkit is another repeat visitor on this list moving up from 4th to 3rd place.  Founded in 2012 by hotelier Marius Donhauser, hotelkit is a majority female-run business that’s growing rapidly but responsibly throughout Europe.  hotelkit’s team motto is “one team one dream” and while the team had to work remotely for a good portion of the year, colleagues are hopeful that 2021 will bring back the annual hotelkit Christmas party famous for great eats and poker.  Under Marius’ leadership, hotelkit has fostered a culture that feels like family so it’s no wonder that employees rate the culture so highly across every single vector.     2. Cloudbeds Cloudbeds may be the fastest-growing hotel tech company right now so while their headquarters are in sunny San Diego the Company has got Silicon Valley energy pumping through its veins.  Not to mention, Cloudbeds is extremely global with local managers in 40 countries. On March 11th (yes that’s right when COVID-19 took the world by storm) Cloudbeds announced the closing of an $80M funding round.  Cloudbeds employees tend to share two main things in common: (1) they are extremely performance-driven and (2) they LOVE to travel. One Cloudbeds employee within the operations department told Hotel Tech Report, “I managed to get promoted on my 1 anniversary day at Cloudbeds, I was so happy and everyone was so attentive to me during this process. Cloudbeds is an amazing company, full of amazing individuals, it's so nice to see the owners in our calls and engaged with us all at all times. I used to think I had worked at good companies, till I met Cloudbeds. This is where I want to stay and grow. It will be hard for any other company to take me from here.”  Cloudbeds has TONS of openings so make sure to browse their career page if you’re in the market.     1. Mews This is Mews’ 3rd year making the list ranking #2 in 2019 and #3 in 2020 - but this is their first year topping the list which is a testament to the strong culture at the firm.  Like most fast-growing companies, the pandemic wreaked havoc on projections and business plans for Mews leading to some difficult decisions needing to be made.  Mews not only came through what was maybe the darkest moment in the history of the hotel industry but came out stronger than ever before.  Mews leadership set a strong course for the business cutting expenses, reorganizing the team, rebranding, focusing on remote deployments, and even making an acquisition.  Quite a busy year - even if things had been normal.  Mews management has created one of those infectious startup cultures that can almost feel cult-like at times often intoxicating entire trade show floors (pre-COVID).  It’s not often that employees at an aggressive high-performance tier 1 venture-backed business get to see their founder dancing through a town hall (affectionately named Mews Con) in a silly costume.  Mews pivoted from hyper-growth mode into a sharp focus on profitability right-sizing the business and is poised to come out of the pandemic far stronger than it went in.  Lots of open roles to check out and we’re sure that list will continue to grow over the coming months.  

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Cloudbeds, SiteMinder & Room Raccoon Top People’s Choice Awards in the 2021 HotelTechAwards

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Hotel Tech Report
3 months ago

Each year along with individual awards for the top-rated hotel software in each category, Hotel Tech Report recognizes the Top 10 most customer-centric global companies in the annual People's Choice Awards. The People's Choice Awards serve to honor and recognize companies who have balanced strong growth with a relentless focus on customer-centricity. The HotelTechAwards platform (by Hotel Tech Report) leverages real customer data to determine best of breed products and companies that help hoteliers grow their bottom lines. “The People’s Choice Award goes to a single company across all categories who demonstrates the strongest customer relationships during the HotelTechAwards.  Cloudbeds had more than 550 hotelier customers come out to share overwhelmingly positive feedback about Cloudbeds products in the midst of a global pandemic.  To have that kind of support from clients during the most challenging market in hotel history says all you need to know about Cloudbeds’ commitment to their partner properties,” says Hotel Tech Report CEO Jordan Hollander. Here’s the Official 2021 People’s Choice List: Cloudbeds SiteMinder RoomRaccoon Bookassist OTA Insight ALICE IDeaS Avvio Hoteltime hotelkit The key factors used to determine the annual People’s Choice Award include total verified customer reviews, geographic reach of reviews, and overall review sentiment and ratings. The best companies know that the most effective way to communicate their value proposition is to empower and amplify the voices of their happy customers.  The People’s Choice Award recognizes companies whose customers really value the relationship and partnership. “Twenty years ago we lived in a world where hoteliers just used one of the three or four technology systems out there and typically just ended up using whatever system they had heard of before.  Today there are thousands of SaaS choices in the market and dozens of great options available for most use cases but the market is moving so quickly that it’s hard for hoteliers to identify and keep track of the best products and companies.  This award honors the companies whose hotel customers are the most vocal advocates of their products to make that process easy,” says Hollander.   About the 2021 People's Choice Award The People's Choice Awards serve to honor and recognize companies who have balanced strong growth with a relentless focus on customer-centricity.  Early on as a startup, it’s easier for companies to maintain strong customer relationships with a limited customer base. But as a company grows its install base and scales globally, maintaining high customer satisfaction becomes increasingly more challenging.  Each year along with individual awards for the top-rated product in each category, Hotel Tech Report recognizes the top 10 most customer-centric global companies in the annual People's Choice Awards acknowledging the achievements of top innovators across all categories who embody the values, transparency, and customer-centricity that lie at the core of truly great companies. View Ranking Methodology>>

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Winners of the 2021 HotelTechAwards Announced

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Hotel Tech Report
3 months ago

Hotel Tech Report has announced winners in the 2021 HotelTechAwards, based on more than 10,000 hotel software product reviews contributed by verified hoteliers during the competition.  Winners are selected based on key performance metrics including product popularity, customer satisfaction, integration compatibility, customer support quality, and more.  Winning a HotelTechAward is the highest achievement in the hotel technology industry. “In the midst of a global pandemic, 318,466 hoteliers visited Hotel Tech Report from every corner of the globe contributing 10,227 verified new product reviews during the 3-month awards period to share insights about their favorite tech products to run and grow their businesses.  It has been inspiring to see this massive wave of hoteliers sharing technology insights and product recommendations,” says Jordan Hollander, CEO of Hotel Tech Report. “This is the most comprehensive dataset around hotelier preferences ever developed and it gives unprecedented insights into tech trends for hotels during a pivotal moment in history.  Winning a HotelTechAward is a huge feat with the 2021 competition being the most competitive year ever.  Every company on this list should be extremely proud of what they've contributed to the growth of the hotel industry.” During the HotelTechAwards, hoteliers from the world's leading hotel companies review the top tech products used at their hotels to increase operating efficiency, drive revenue, and improve the guest experience. This data is used to identify the best hotel tech products and organizations. "The HotelTechAwards  are the only prize in the industry that is completely and transparently customer-driven — it's the hoteliers that decide who is best, and it's their opinion that matters most." Gautam Lulla, CEO at Pegasus. "We at SiteMinder believe strongly in the essence of openness; it is what underpins the very core of what we stand for, and the HotelTechAwards, through the program's data-driven and transparent process, aligns firmly with this value.” - Sankar Narayan, CEO at SiteMinder “This honor has deep, personal meaning as it is decided upon by our clients and represents our passion and focus for providing the most sophisticated revenue technology and comprehensive support.” Dr. Ravi Mehrotra Founder at IDeaS “The HotelTechAwards are a powerful stamp of approval for any company to possess and for hoteliers to trust. We value the HotelTechAwards process, which collects thousands of verified reviews from around the world each year.” Alex Shashou, Co-Founder at ALICE “HotelTechReport is the leading platform for technology in the hotel industry, and its meticulous and impartial verification process makes this one of the most prestigious awards.” Moritz von Petersdorff-Campen, Co-Founder at SuitePad The competition spans core areas of hotel software & technology: marketing, revenue, operations, and guest experience. 2021 Voting included participation from major hotel groups including Four Seasons, Hilton, Marriott, Accor Hotels, Hyatt, Intercontinental, Rosewood, and thousands of independents. "We originally created the HotelTechAwards as a democratized way to help our fellow hoteliers quickly determine best of breed vendors based on data they can trust and the scope of the competition this year is a testament to how far the industry has come in the last decade.  The HotelTechAwards rating process is simple, transparent, and unbiased--judging is based on time tested ranking factors, publicly available data, and crowdsourced insights from verified hoteliers who have hands-on experience with each product.” The HotelTechAwards are often referred to as "the Grammys of Hotel Tech" and winners were selected from the top technology products around the world. The HotelTechAwards are the industry's only data-driven awards platform with winners determined not by a handful of judges or popularity votes but by a global community comprised of thousands of verified hotel technology users across more than 127 countries.   Best Hotel Software Companies List >>

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HR & Staffing Category Press Releases

Workpop Named 2018’s Top Rated HR & Staffing Software in the HotelTechAwards

Hotel Tech Report
1 year ago

February 12, 2018 -  Hotel Tech Report has named Workpop 2018’s top rated HR & Staffing Software based on data from thousands of hoteliers in more than 40 countries around the world.  Over 100 of the world’s elite hotel technology products competed for a chance to win this prestigious title. The HotelTechAwards platform (by HotelTechReport.com) leverages real customer data to determine best of breed products that help hoteliers grow their bottom lines. “Hotels and hospitality in general have some of the highest employee turnover rates of any industry.  This means that attracting and retaining talent is absolutely critical to running a property that beats the compset.  Workpop has done an incredible job at bringing modern technology into the hiring and on-boarding function at hospitality businesses around the world,” says Hotel Tech Report’s Adam Hollander. Workpop has raised more than $16M in venture capital funding and is poised for even greater growth in 2018. Hoteliers recognized Workpop’s next generation user experience design where Workpop exceeded the category average by more than 10%.  Despite being an efficiency tool to help hiring managers save time and make better decisions faster, Workpop was also rated as delivering some of the best returns on investment across all categories of hotel technology. We asked an experienced Los Angeles based Resort F&B Manager how they felt about Workpop’s software to which they commented, “Workpop is handy, easy, quick, efficient and RESULTS galore!! Great tool for recruiting with the bonus of awesome HRMS options. I wish I would have found it sooner! It has really simplified things for us. We have multiple locations in multiple regions and Workpop makes it simple."   To read the full review and more, head to Workpop's profile on Hotel Tech Report